Definition of ponderous in English:

ponderous

adjective

  • 1Slow and clumsy because of great weight.

    ‘a swarthy, ponderous giant of a man’
    • ‘The superior fitness and organisation within the Malton side was always going to cause problems for a ponderous and ageing visiting side who had little to offer apart from a big front row.’
    • ‘The jury remains out on whether the ponderous Blanc can replace the discarded Jaap Stam and the champions have leaked seven goals in the four games he has played.’
    • ‘I'll box and battle him, and make him look slow and ponderous.’
    • ‘At times in that second stanza, Glasgow plodded around like one of the infamous local vehicles run on illegal cooking oil: wheezy, ponderous and not too reliable.’
    • ‘Arthur Thatford was the slow, ponderous sort, and his sister little better.’
    • ‘He was too slow, too ponderous; he had a big, heavy punch, but there was nothing spontaneous about him in the ring.’
    • ‘After Jurassic Park, the monster looked so slow and ponderous it was pretty funny.’
    • ‘‘A lot of big fighters are slow and ponderous, but I apply myself on my speed as opposed to power,’ he said.’
    • ‘In addition to hauling their own weight, the ponderous vehicles must plow about 17 tons of air out of their way every mile!’
    • ‘As per the vehicle's steering and handling, it is generally ponderous and has a slow response to steering inputs.’
    • ‘Stansfield had lost none of his ability in winning the ball in the air but on the ground he was slow and ponderous and a number of defensive errors became attributed to him.’
    • ‘Certainly his deft karate skills have become slow and ponderous.’
    • ‘That final resting place of ponderous pachyderms would be, for the unscrupulous and disturbingly clean bad guy, the mother lode of ivory.’
    • ‘His jumping is crisp and accurate at this game, whereas he can often be slow and ponderous over fences.’
    • ‘Joaquin came in for the ponderous Luis Enrique and made such an impact that one wondered how he was not preferred to the veteran Barcelona player before now.’
    • ‘The Nissan Patrol drives as it looks - heavy and a little ponderous.’
    • ‘Foreman was thought to be slow and ponderous heading into his title fight with Frazier.’
    • ‘So often last season, those two provided the creative spark going forward, whereas the current side looks ponderous and predictable in the final third by comparison.’
    • ‘One of the rules of radio: nimble and facile is preferable to ponderous and slow.’
    • ‘He had a pretty good beard going and he moved with a slow, ponderous deliberation, like he was reaching the end of a long journey.’
    clumsy, slow, heavy, awkward, lumbering, slow-moving, cumbersome, heavy-footed, ungainly, graceless, maladroit, uncoordinated, blundering, like a bull in a china shop
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    1. 1.1 (especially of speech or writing) dull or laborious.
      ‘the show is loaded down with ponderous one-liners’
      • ‘There's no point in comparing the graphic novel Road to Perdition with the respectable though somewhat ponderous movie based on it.’
      • ‘Beck's answers are slow and considered, thoughtful to the point of being ponderous.’
      • ‘That we heard Paul Kagame, president of Rwanda, saying it's too slow, it's too ponderous.’
      • ‘The courts move in their usual ponderous manner.’
      • ‘The very slow action and scene progression of Rainmaker may appear overly ponderous, but is quite effective in conveying the desperation of the characters.’
      • ‘Congress had managed to wade through the ponderous 200-page tome.’
      • ‘Government-by-committee and persistent bureaucratic controls lead to ponderous decision-making.’
      • ‘This opera is long and ponderous enough, and though there is much depth to plumb, the tempos, to me, must move along.’
      • ‘After a half hour of ponderous, laugh-free, heavy dialogue, I reclassified Prizzi's Honor as a serious mob movie.’
      • ‘The price is obscene, and I often find the typical article… ponderous.’
      • ‘The response of university authorities has been slow and ponderous.’
      • ‘House of the Spirits was stilted and ponderous and written with a poor command of the nuances of English.’
      • ‘No other architect has made the slow, ponderous, collaborative business of construction into such a direct expression of his demented, agonised, fertile soul.’
      • ‘Like The End Of Violence, it sometimes feels clumsy and ponderous, and seems unlikely to attract more than a cult audience.’
      • ‘LaGamma's essay in particular is informative without being ponderous.’
      • ‘The book's long, ponderous descriptions of southern landscapes and sub-Faulknerian dialogue led some readers to suspect that the hero was in no hurry to see her again.’
      • ‘Most contemporary Baptists would find a sermon like this ponderous and pedantic.’
      • ‘Her meticulous nature and ponderous pauses would lead to drawn out silences that could terminate any argument in a concise finale, leaving you in no doubt who was right and who was wrong.’
      • ‘The hymn has a heavy, ponderous, sonorous melody that goes all the way back to the chants of the fourth century.’
      • ‘They are only intended to add ponderous weight to Eastwood's simple, plodding narrative, which might as well be a 45 minute episode of a cop show.’
      laboured, laborious, dull, awkward, clumsy, forced, stilted, unnatural, artificial, turgid, stodgy, stolid, lifeless, plodding, pedestrian, boring, uninteresting, solemn, serious, tedious, monotonous, dry, dreary, pedantic
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Origin

Late Middle English: via French from Latin ponderosus, from pondus, ponder- ‘weight’.

Pronunciation

ponderous

/ˈpɒnd(ə)rəs/