Definition of pompous in English:

pompous

adjective

  • 1Affectedly grand, solemn, or self-important.

    ‘a pompous ass who pretends he knows everything’
    • ‘As if his letters were not a true indicator of his pompous attitude, Donovan in person was pretentious and rude.’
    • ‘Many of the most pompous and arrogant men I've ever met have been obsessed by upgrading their flight tickets.’
    • ‘Lord Irvine has always been portrayed as a pompous and arrogant.’
    • ‘They look a little deeper into the matter without being pompous, arrogant or patronising.’
    • ‘Amrish Puri stars in one of the tales as a vain and pompous man.’
    • ‘Fifth, the remedy cannot be pompous pontification or moral policing.’
    • ‘It is here that Nazneen is to spend the rest of her days married to Chanu Babu - a pompous yet discreetly sensitive man twenty years her senior.’
    • ‘Technical people too often seem distant, effete, imperious, and even pompous.’
    • ‘There was rarely anything vicious about these jokes: they were leg pulling jokes which only the sensitive and pompous found annoying.’
    • ‘I was pompous, arrogant and so full of my self that I thought that I could do anything.’
    • ‘But saying something on a grand scale is what fools or pompous pundits usually do.’
    • ‘He is arrogant, pompous, never misses a chance to show off his superiority, and drinks to excess.’
    • ‘Taking an aristocrat's pompous and often unrealistic pontifications as an ideal for living is clearly not a good thing.’
    • ‘I don't think anyone could read this behaviour in any other way than being pompous and patronising.’
    • ‘You also said that your Dad always taught you that being pompous and self-important was just about the greatest sin of all.’
    • ‘Still, many Panelists who accepted the usage also remarked that it was pretentious or pompous.’
    • ‘Aristotle's critics have pounced upon this sentence as an example of pompous obscurantism.’
    • ‘Keith was painted as patronising and pompous, with a grandiose idea of her own importance.’
    • ‘I've just deleted a very long and somewhat pompous sociology essay that you probably wouldn't have been able to bear reading all the way through.’
    • ‘He'll have to swallow that pompous, condescending smile of his once he sees my marks.’
    self-important, imperious, overbearing, domineering, magisterial, pontifical, sententious, grandiose, affected, stiff, pretentious, puffed up, arrogant, vain, haughty, proud, conceited, egotistic, supercilious, condescending, patronizing
    bombastic, high-sounding, high-flown, lofty, turgid, grandiloquent, magniloquent, ornate, overblown, overripe, inflated, rhetorical, oratorical, declamatory, sonorous, portentous, pedantic, boastful, boasting, bragging, braggart, falstaffian
    View synonyms
  • 2archaic Characterized by pomp or splendour.

    ‘processions and other pompous shows’
    • ‘The pompous, splendid Library, on the other hand, visually overwhelms its contents.’
    • ‘Walton is splendidly pompous and circumstantial when extolling the Babylonian gods.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French pompeux ‘full of grandeur’, from late Latin pomposus, from pompa ‘pomp’.

Pronunciation

pompous

/ˈpɒmpəs/