Main definitions of pom-pom in English

: pom-pom1pom-pom2

pom-pom1

(also pompon)

noun

  • 1A small woollen ball attached to a garment, especially a hat, for decoration.

    • ‘Kelli jazzed up white curtains by sewing on bright pompoms.’
    • ‘There are the color-coded pompoms worn on caps designating the 16 branches of the service in 1851.’
    • ‘Much of the vigor of the textile traditions of Mahdia comes through the embellishment of woven cloth with embroidery and the addition of fringes, tassels, and pompoms.’
    • ‘The following art period, when the gourds were dry, I let the students choose from myriad paint colors, and odds and ends such as felt, pompons and cotton.’
    • ‘Some fun materials to use include buttons, fabric trim, yarn, cotton, feathers and pompoms.’
    • ‘The few clouds resemble little woolen pompoms.’
    • ‘Their outfit often includes quilted socks with bright red pompons on the toes.’
    • ‘Terri's was the same dress she wore last year, red with white pompoms dangling off the hem.’
    • ‘Even now, when I saw the kids in their faux fur-lined coats and pompom topped hats, I could remember the way Rob had knelt to the sidewalk, had so delicately touched one of the young girl's silken braids.’
    • ‘She held up a dark purple hoodie with pompoms on the ties.’
    • ‘She preferred ones with pompons or clashing colors, but lately she had been restricted to the same bland dress robe she always wore.’
    • ‘Please, please, please I'll do anything if you convince her not to bring the unicorn and pom-pom sweater this Sunday.’
    • ‘Rainman tried on the hat - pale purple with a big puffy pom-pom - and cracked me up.’
    • ‘You mean those little fuzzy pom-pom balls with plastic googly eyes on them?’
    • ‘In contrast round toed flats will be adorned with pompoms, rosebud trims, grosgrain bows and Tyrolean ribbons.’
    • ‘Their traditional loincloths are sometimes decorated with bright tassels and pompoms.’
    • ‘We have pompons, blue and red wigs, glitter and face paint.’
    • ‘With her short skirt and pompoms, she searches for the game plan, using snack food and beer to distract some rabid fans that get in her way.’
    • ‘Unintentional humour is provided by the ‘ninjas,’ who carry rifles and wear ninja hoods with little pompoms on top.’
    • ‘As her family looked at them and cherished them, they did not critique the design, layout, amount of pompoms, etc.’
    1. 1.1 A large round cluster of brightly coloured streamers waved in pairs by cheerleaders.
      • ‘Some of the crowd even stood as the players entered, some young girls flailing around with blue colored pompoms.’
      • ‘At one point, the school's cheerleading squad, complete with pink pompons, surrounded Borissov wanting a photograph with him.’
      • ‘But a few days before the contest the pompoms were found dumped in a garden - and the Red Hot Flames, who regularly appear at the Rugby League club's Willows ground, went on to win a national title at the Manchester Velodrome.’
      • ‘A close second goes to 49ers WR Terrell Owens, who has taken to dancing with pompoms after touchdowns.’
      • ‘And Ms Mason, a partner at Sanderson's, stressed there was more to being a cheerleader than simply waving pompoms in the air.’
      • ‘But I needed my friends, oh I needed them like a cheerleader needs pompoms.’
      • ‘Kate dropped the pompoms and headed for the gym exit.’
      • ‘Jessica had gotten into her perky attitude, and was waving her green and white pompoms in the air even when they weren't doing a choreographed cheer.’
      • ‘Give her some pigtails and pompoms and I think she could do it.’
      • ‘For the pretty 23-year-old used to be a rugby league cheerleader and regularly performed on the pitch with pompoms at home and away matches.’
      • ‘The stadium literally buzzed with proud mums and dads, brothers and sisters waving tinsel pompoms and cardboard placards, and schoolmates excitedly discussing how they would vote.’
      • ‘It is as if we satisfy ourselves with shaking our pompoms and shouting ‘Gay Pride.’’
      • ‘Jumping around in a miniskirt, waving pompons when you're ten is cute; but when you're fifteen, well, it goes beyond cute.’
      • ‘The cheerleaders who were already occupying a big table in the center did the DSV cheer in their seats, waving their pompoms around noisily.’
      • ‘For a lot of people, cheerleading immediately conjures images of American college girls, invariably blond and with perfect teeth, wearing cardigans and the team letter on their chest, and of course shaking pompoms.’
      • ‘Suddenly, the bare-legged girls with pompoms, imported to pep up the pre-match business at the Premier League's earliest matches, look like a high point for the organisation's modesty and self-awareness.’
      • ‘The cheerleaders came off the stage, shaking their pompoms in the excitement of a successful performance.’
      • ‘They were a crimson blur of pompoms, sneaker squeaks and smiles.’
      • ‘Hometown crowds try to unnerve enemy shooters with rally towels, pompoms, clackers, rhythmic chants, balloons, and signs that say ‘BRICK.’’
      • ‘While schoolchildren with pompoms, dragon dancers, and toddlers in pink ballerina outfits stood in the centre of the field, the athletes, waving to the crowd, rode around the perimeter in small vehicles.’
    2. 1.2 A dahlia, chrysanthemum, or aster with small tightly clustered petals.
      as modifier ‘pompom and border dahlias’
      • ‘Contrast flower shapes as well, letting spiky, flat-topped, and pompom blooms play off each other.’
      • ‘Although they are largely pruned with secateurs (in the older, more traditional Kyoto style), the pompoms grow all the more densely when pruned mechanically with shears (in the Tokyo style).’
      • ‘The present serious damage to biodiversity comes from conventional invasive species like woody species, lantana, bugweed and pompom.’
      • ‘Double-petalled, bright lemon-yellow blossoms resembling pompoms grace the top of this very tall plant.’
      • ‘Other China asters resemble pompons or peonies.’
      • ‘Some interesting flower forms of mums you can plant include those called buttons, spiders, pompoms, daisy-like, spoons, anemone, singles, doubles, and semi-doubles.’
      • ‘Small, miniature, and pompon dahlias should be about 2' apart.’
      • ‘In pompons, many varieties are cataloged but I feel that the following will be very good for our particular purpose: Atom, Aimee, Betty Ann, Joe Fette, Reginald, Betty Malone, and Sherry.’
      • ‘Flower growers cut chrysanthemum blooms soon after the green colour disappeared from the centre of the flowers and harvested pompons when fully developed, but they gathered orchids only when the blooms were fully open.’

Origin

Mid 18th century (originally denoting a bunch of ribbons, feathers, etc. worn by women in the hair or on a dress): French pompon, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

pom-pom

/ˈpɒmpɒm/

Main definitions of pom-pom in English

: pom-pom1pom-pom2

pom-pom2

noun

British
  • An automatic quick-firing two-pounder cannon of the Second World War period, typically mounted on a ship and used against aircraft.

    • ‘The pompom (or pom-pom, pom pom, etc.) was a 40.5mm automatic cannon that fired 2-lb. (2pdr) ammunition.’
    • ‘A lighter version of the Maxim pom-pom did see service: the Sockelflak.’
    • ‘Beyond here, towards the bow, a quadruple two-pounder anti-aircraft or pom-pom gun system with a stack of ammunition ready by its side lends something of a Chuuk lagoon atmosphere to the dives.’

Origin

Late 19th century: imitative of the sound of the discharge.

Pronunciation

pom-pom

/ˈpɒmpɒm/