Main definitions of policy in English

: policy1policy2

policy1

noun

  • 1A course or principle of action adopted or proposed by an organization or individual:

    ‘the government's controversial economic policies’
    [mass noun] ‘it is not company policy to dispense with our older workers’
    • ‘However, this did not mean the end of the policy of support for the pound.’
    • ‘Imperialist war is not simply the policy of this or that political leader or party.’
    • ‘He might take it as a national mandate to pursue the policy of truculent unilateralism.’
    • ‘In west Africa, few countries have adopted national policies to implement these principles.’
    • ‘Its real failure was that it adopted the policies that you now propose for the SEP.’
    • ‘Instead of really disciplining themselves on the policy of growth, what do they do?’
    • ‘The third reason for the absence of revolution was thus the policy of the Communist party.’
    • ‘That means working in the United Nations for the rule of law, not the policy of might is right.’
    • ‘The policies that the Government proposes to change have been in place for all that period.’
    • ‘If you accept toughness as the test of your policies, why not adopt the toughest policy of all?’
    • ‘In this way, the material basis of the policy of social equilibrium is eaten away.’
    • ‘They are not compatible with Liberal Democrat party policies and principles.’
    • ‘One controversial form of this has been the policy of affirmative redistricting.’
    • ‘I would also ask the committee to consider adopting a policy of precautionary principle.’
    • ‘There never was an era when the policy of the Lesser Evil made less sense than now.’
    • ‘As a whole this group has failed to propose an active policy for the working class.’
    • ‘The policy of war abroad is invariably bound up with political repression at home.’
    • ‘This was the start of the policy of internment, which would terrorise Catholics for four years.’
    • ‘It has been the policy of successive Governments not to provide funds for memorials.’
    • ‘The Commissioners meet once a week to develop and adopt proposals on new policies and legislation.’
    plans, strategy, proposed action, blueprint, approach, scheme, stratagem, programme, schedule, code, system, guidelines, intentions, notions, theory, line, position, stance, attitude
    practice, custom, procedure, wont, way, tack, routine, matter of course, style, pattern, convention, mode, rule
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1archaic [mass noun] Prudent or expedient conduct or action:
      ‘a course of policy and wisdom’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French policie civil administration, via Latin from Greek politeia citizenship, from politēs citizen, from polis city.

Pronunciation:

policy

/ˈpɒlɪsi/

Main definitions of policy in English

: policy1policy2

policy2

noun

  • A contract of insurance:

    ‘they took out a joint policy’
    • ‘Beneficiaries either did not have insurance, or their policies did not cover the full costs of the damage.’
    • ‘If the driver was covered by a policy of insurance there would usually be no need for such an action.’
    • ‘I was told by my insurance company that my policy didn't cover cameras when checked as luggage.’
    • ‘I was not made aware that the policy covered both FOQ's costs and those of the defendants.’
    • ‘We will only provide a refund if a claim has not been made under the policy in the current period of insurance.’
    • ‘Couples with children may be better to opt for two single policies instead of a joint life policy.’
    • ‘This policy pays a lump sum to the mortgage lender to pay off your home loan so your family does not get any cash payment directly.’
    • ‘Sometimes, people have no idea that they have a policy with an insurance company.’
    • ‘With-profits policies are a type of insurance policy used by many people to save for a pension.’
    • ‘You can buy policies from your mortgage provider, bank, and an insurance broker.’
    • ‘For many of us, the biggest asset in our estate will be the proceeds of our life assurance policies.’
    • ‘Pet owners also need to be aware of the difference between annual policies and life contracts.’
    • ‘A valued policy is a policy which specifies the agreed value of the subject matter insured.’
    • ‘If you don't inform your insurance company your policy could be invalidated.’
    • ‘The failure to inform the lenders of the broker's fraud induced them to think that valid policies were in place.’
    • ‘You are not obliged to assign a life assurance policy to cover a mortgage on a rental property.’
    • ‘It must also be borne in mind that the insurer was aware of the terms of the dredging contract when the policy was issued.’
    • ‘Help the Aged and Age Concern both have insurance divisions which offer policies with no upper age limit.’
    • ‘Bear in mind that the MVA is only applied if money is taken out of the fund - if the policy is cashed in.’
    • ‘In respect of Assureds domiciled elsewhere policies will be issued by the Underwriters.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French police bill of lading, contract of insurance, from Provençal poliss(i)a, probably from medieval Latin apodissa, apodixa, based on Greek apodeixis evidence, proof, from apodeiknunai demonstrate, show.

Pronunciation:

policy

/ˈpɒlɪsi/