Definition of polarimeter in English:

polarimeter

noun

  • An instrument for measuring the polarization of light, and especially for determining the effect of a substance in rotating the plane of polarization of light.

    • ‘For remote-sensing applications, the goal is to produce pixel-integrated imaging polarimeters and spectral imagers directly on the IR FPA without the need for external optical filter elements or moving parts.’
    • ‘Circular dichroism spectra were measured in a Jasco-600 polarimeter with a bandwidth of 2 nm.’
    • ‘A 6-cm receiving system with a polarimeter, made by engineers of German Max-Planck-Institute for Radio-astronomy, has been installed to the 25 radio telescope in Urumqi, the capital of western China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.’
    • ‘The SMM satellite's coronagraph/polarimeter detected a large halo coronal mass ejection; the halo meant that the cloud was directed at Earth.’
    • ‘They feature fast measurement speed (15 measurements per second), ideal for translating the polarimeter across samples and providing for an averaging of measurements for increased precision.’
    • ‘Rotation angles were measured with a polarimeter on one-second integration interval.’
    • ‘A major difficulty in using microscopes for polarimeters is that most polarimeters purposely only collect light from a very small angle’
    • ‘For example, the effect of acids and salts on a solution of an optically active substance such as nicotine could be followed by observing the rotation of the plane of polarised light through a polarimeter.’
    • ‘Because existing spectrometers and polarimeters make use of mechanical scanning methods, they are unreliable and require a long time to acquire complete data sets.’
    • ‘Using polarimeters, which enable the polarization of the light received to be determined, astronomers hoped to be able to identify whether there was dust within the corona.’
    • ‘The literature is full of other, more complicated ways to measure optical anisotropy (involving polarimeters and ellipsometers, for example), usually using a combination of polarizers and retarders.’
    • ‘PDR Chiral make advanced laser polarimeters, but their site not just a glorified sales pitch for their instruments, as is so often the case with commercial web sites.’
    • ‘All the CD experiments were done in a JASCO-J715 polarimeter (JASCO, Tokyo, Japan) in a 0.1-cm pathlength cell, with a slit width of 1 nm, response time of 4 s and scan speed of 50 nm/s. Each data point was an average of three accumulations.’
    • ‘A nano-optic waveplate combined with a polarization beamsplitter can measure differential polarization and phase response in a compact polarimeter.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from medieval Latin polaris polar + -meter.

Pronunciation:

polarimeter

/ˌpəʊləˈrɪmɪtə/