Main definitions of poke in English

: poke1poke2poke3

poke1

verb

  • 1with object Jab or prod (someone or something) with one's finger or a sharp object.

    ‘he poked Benny in the ribs and pointed’
    no object ‘they sniffed, felt, and poked at everything they bought’
    • ‘That is followed by the curious urge to poke it with a stick.’
    • ‘Don't poke me or prod me when you are talking to me.’
    • ‘Sometimes the children can be seen poking them with sticks.’
    • ‘They were dreadful sleepers, but I'm sure that was because I was prodding and poking them all the time!’
    • ‘It needles you, it shoves, it pokes you in the side - not hard, but hard enough to make you yelp.’
    • ‘I grinned and stepped back slightly, but was pushed further as he poked me with the stick.’
    • ‘She believed that she got the lead poisoning when a sharp pencil was poked into her cheek.’
    • ‘But I think that just poking him with a stick and expecting him to leap to his feet and resume his journey as if no time had passed would serve only to hasten his final death throes.’
    • ‘It only seemed like I had been asleep for two minutes when I was poked at and I nearly jumped out of my skin before I realized our car ride was over.’
    • ‘We rode the subway out to the Bronx Zoo, and joined the hordes strolling around poking the animals with sticks.’
    • ‘We poked it with a stick and established that the wasps had moved out.’
    • ‘It is poked repeatedly with a stick until it is absolutely livid.’
    • ‘Sometimes, you see a hornet's nest, and some wise part of you knows that you shouldn't go poking it with a stick.’
    • ‘We've been poking him with a sharp stick, and if you do that long enough, you have to either shoot the dog or get bit.’
    • ‘If people are poked with a sharp enough stick, like the threat of a large-scale war, they'll respond.’
    • ‘Abi was taken to an admissions room, where she was poked and prodded and monitored by various midwives and doctors.’
    • ‘It was a real ‘crikey’ moment, and I wanted wrestle it, or at least poke it with a stick, but nobody had a camera so there was no point.’
    • ‘Have you ever experienced the sensation of falling into a deep sleep, only to have someone poke your ears with sharp needles?’
    • ‘She tries poking them with a stick to get them down and then throwing a rock.’
    • ‘The use of the pejorative ‘insidious’ is a little unnecessary, but I'm not one who should poke people with sticks for using flowery language.’
    prod, jab, dig, nudge, tap, butt, ram, shove, punch, prick, jolt
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Prod and stir (a fire) with a poker to make it burn more fiercely.
      ‘she drew the curtains then poked the fire into a blaze’
      • ‘After a while I rose and poked a few more sticks into the fire.’
      • ‘They were seated in a square surrounding the flickering embers, and every now and then somebody would poke the fire to keep it burning.’
      • ‘Then someone poked at the fire and it flared up, illuminating the room.’
      • ‘Then I went back to the clearing, where Solastian was absently poking at the fire and completely oblivious to everything else.’
      • ‘He poked the partially burned wood a few times with a stick and flames rose and crackled as they burned brighter.’
      • ‘From 1946 onwards, I have continuously poked fires with the help of various materials.’
      • ‘Matt was silent as he continued to poke at the fire, every so often looking up from the flames to gaze at the lake's distant shore.’
      • ‘With an exasperated sigh, she stood and sat by the fire, poking the embers absent-mindedly with a stick.’
      • ‘One person, the leader, judging by the odd tufts of fur in random spots on his cloak, poked at the fire with his staff.’
      • ‘He watched her dead-white face for a while, and then went to poke at the fire some more.’
      • ‘He poked at the fire with a stick pushing unburned dung cakes into the centre.’
      • ‘After walking for a while they found a wizard sitting in a small clearing poking at a fire with a stick.’
      • ‘Calomar had opened the door to the wood burning stove, and was poking at the fire with a metal poker he had found.’
      • ‘Kumma was poking at the fire with a stick, his eyes flickering the blaze.’
      • ‘Jun zoned out it seemed, she was poking at the fire.’
      • ‘The girl threw a log on the fire, and poked the embers into flames.’
      • ‘She poked at the fire causing it to flare up and throw more shadows across their faces.’
      • ‘She again sat beside the fire, poking at its dead embers with a fallen green tree branch.’
      • ‘The page stirred from his pallet on the hearth and poked the fire back to life, then padded over, yawning, with a candle.’
      • ‘This morning we are sitting in my friend's big livingroom, poking at the fire in the big fireplace.’
    2. 1.2 Make (a hole) in something by prodding or jabbing at it.
      ‘don't forget to poke holes in the dough to allow steam to escape’
      • ‘There were four large sliding doors in the house and beyond them a shrine. I used to be scolded for poking holes in the sliding doors.’
      • ‘She poked a few more holes in the belt and then cinched it around her waist.’
      • ‘For those who are curious, the researchers blew up the eggshells by poking holes in the top and the bottom, emptying them of egg, and filling them with hydrogen gas instead.’
      • ‘The whole week went real smooth, except for one little incident where I kind of poked a hole in one of the pictures.’
      • ‘Poke holes in the figs and repeat this step one more time.’
      • ‘The great emotional issue for most oil producing states is upstream investment - the actual poking of holes in the ground.’
      • ‘You must poke very small holes though your liner so that aerobic conditions are not created in the soil.’
      • ‘Even six thousand pounds of ballast wasn't enough to sink it, so we had to try to de-gas it by poking holes in it, and eventually it sank.’
      • ‘Alternatively, poke holes in the can and throw it out attached to a length of string - you'll need to retrieve it to keep poking more holes in it as the contents disappear.’
      • ‘A dibble was an instrument for poking holes in the ground for planting.’
      • ‘Trent and I had just sneaked into the storage closet when his gaze drifted to the snare drum, and before I knew it, he started poking holes into it.’
      • ‘You've poked more holes into what's left of my ship, and I don't want to wait around here for whoever may come looking.’
      • ‘I bought pie plates and string, grabbed a hammer and nail, and began poking holes and stringing pie plates.’
      • ‘It growled at him and latched its teeth onto the windshield, the very tips of its fangs breaching the meager shield and poking holes in the glass.’
      • ‘‘We use it to decide what to do as far as poking holes in the ground,’ says Davis.’
      • ‘One could go on poking holes, but the improbabilities are legion.’
    3. 1.3vulgar slang (of a man) have sexual intercourse with (a woman).
  • 2with object and adverbial of direction Thrust (something, such as one's head) in a particular direction.

    ‘I poked my head around the door to see what was going on’
    • ‘The door slid open with a familiar creak, an untidy head poking itself through, silhouetted against the warm glow of the lamps outside.’
    • ‘Akos poked his great shaggy head around the frame and looked at her.’
    • ‘A man with a tonsure, much like the friars of old, poked his awkwardly shaped head out of the opening.’
    • ‘The doctor, a balding man with a pitted red nose, poked his head around the doorframe.’
    • ‘I make almost no noise as I stumble down the hallway but still Jomei opens his door and pokes a sleepy orange head out, ‘Where are you going?’’
    • ‘Delia quickly caught their senile cat, Picasso, as he was poking his fat little head out.’
    • ‘The goat stands on his hind legs, embraces the glass, and pokes his long pointed tongue into the foam.’
    • ‘At the sound of his rumbling voice, Gualtero poked his tousled brown head out of the shadows.’
    • ‘The woman steps up to the door, pokes her head in and asks: ‘Is this the 307 bus?’’
    • ‘Finally, the door creaked over and my father poked his skinny, bony face into the room.’
    • ‘The traveller is shown poking his head and right arm through a boundary of stars enclosing this everyday world and reaching out to a universe of wonders beyond.’
    • ‘Mr. Mbewe slides the stick shift into gear then rests his left hand on the wheel, poking a casual right elbow out of the window.’
    • ‘Follow this course in life and your nose'll never poke itself beyond a book.’
    • ‘A small, shriveled head poked itself out from the miniature doorway and peered at her.’
    • ‘That was easily enough to poke one's head into the water.’
    • ‘He just poked out his tongue from behind his helmet as he sent the puck back to the centre.’
    1. 2.1no object, with adverbial Protrude and be visible.
      ‘she had wisps of grey hair poking out from under her bonnet’
      • ‘We cut to the next scene, where he is now under a large mound of sand, now with only the top of his head visible, poking through the side of the mound.’
      • ‘White hair poked out from under his cap and a pipe was clenched between his teeth.’
      • ‘Leonard was a very tall young man, with bright blonde hair poking out from under his tattered cowboy hat.’
      • ‘His shirt was open to the second button; a few curly hairs poked through.’
      • ‘A widow of several years, she wears a green, yellow and orange headscarf, from which black and grey curls poke out.’
      • ‘Dark brown hair poked out around the edge of his white baseball cap.’
      • ‘When I awoke, I was covered in strange purple hairs that poked out through my clothes and made a sound only dogs could hear.’
      • ‘There was a big stick poking out of one of the trashcans.’
      • ‘Tufts of springy white hair poked up from the center of the crown.’
      • ‘Pausing, he scratched a tuft of vibrant red hair poking from beneath his cap.’
      • ‘Small bits of dark brown hair poked out from underneath his hat.’
      • ‘My father's short reddish brown hair was poking out from beneath his hat, and my mother's dark hair wasn't far from being out of order as well.’
      • ‘I can recall how O looked as if it were yesterday: lying next to me, his shirt slightly undone, the top of his chest hair poking out, huge grin on his face.’
      • ‘With such visible history, the sun-blackened ruins poking out from the undergrowth and overgrowth, Nevis is fun to explore.’
      • ‘Her fang teeth were starting to extend, poking down so they just visible in her open mouth, and her hands gripped the arms of the chair.’
      • ‘One had a large backwards blue cap on his head, messy black hair poking out from underneath.’
      • ‘Ben watched her as she worked, wisps of her hair falling about her face and her tongue just visibly poking out of the corner of her mouth as she concentrated.’
      • ‘The shock of black hair poking from the top of his white OU visor was wet and mussed from a sideline celebration shower.’
      • ‘Wiry white and grey hairs poked out of his thick, flabby ears and his blue eyes were shoved deep into this rough-skinned face.’
      • ‘We must have walked for about an hour, and were on the point of turning round and returning to the caravan, when we spotted a stick poking out of the water, about twenty yards offshore.’
      stick out, jut out, stand out, protrude, project, extend, loom
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1An act of poking someone or something.

    ‘she gave the fire a poke’
    • ‘I laughed and gave him one last poke before I let go.’
    • ‘Delia felt a poke and immediately turned to her father, who was holding a piece of toast out for her.’
    • ‘I liked the fact that it came across as an affectionate poke, and the fact that Garth looked like a cross between one of my friends and that bloke in Can who had the big sidies.’
    • ‘He sighed, then sneezed as an unlucky poke of the stick in the fire sent a cloud of smoke into his face.’
    • ‘Paige was startled out of his musings by a particularly hard poke to his back.’
    • ‘I did not care for the pokes, prods, or interrogation I felt was imminent.’
    • ‘We were in the air about 45 minutes when I felt a poke in the ribs and turned to find my row-mate prodding me with his rolled-up reading material.’
    • ‘Lesley Vainikolo also left the Belle Vue battleground early but his double vision from a poke in the eye will not keep him out of this Friday's visit to The Shay to take on Halifax.’
    • ‘Her finger moved down my belly ending with a poke as she slowly pulled away backwards, turned and left me in my waking dream.’
    • ‘They're posh girls who talk like lads down the boozer about boobs and bums and can't resist giving them a poke and a prod in a giggly, sapphic way - all very private school changing rooms.’
    • ‘Consumer loyalty is rewarded with a poke in the eye.’
    • ‘And he delivers this brilliant poke in the collective eye of manipulative, one-sided documentary makers everywhere.’
    • ‘On the one hand, the elections this month gave them a poke in the eye.’
    • ‘But it was just a question of getting on with it with pokes and prods.’
    • ‘After a few prods and pokes, he gave an injection for the pain, sat at his desk, lifted the phone and ordered the air ambulance.’
    • ‘The main purpose of my wee trip was to see my Uncle John and give him a poke and prod prior to his heart surgery.’
    • ‘With appropriate physical gentleness, have a poke and a prod and check out the territory.’
    • ‘Her mom gave her a poke and gestured to the table.’
    • ‘A poke in his side however caught his attention and he looked down to a frowning Shi who had a scolding look on her face.’
    • ‘I gave the house sale a good poke and prod today and it sounds as if the urgency of our situation has got through.’
    prod, jab, dig, elbow, nudge, tap, butt
    thrust, push, jab, shove, plunge, insertion
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1vulgar slang An act of sexual intercourse.
  • 2a poke round/aroundinformal A look or search around a place.

    ‘his mother comes into his room sometimes and has a poke round’
  • 3British informal mass noun Power or acceleration in a car.

    ‘I expect you'd prefer something with a bit more poke’
    • ‘Breakaway is sharper on the exit of a bend but that has as much to with extra poke and grippier tyres as it does with the suspension.’
    • ‘Well, the petrol version will get you from to 60 in about two hours, so if you want any poke at all, and surely that's the reason why you're buying a BMW, you have to go for the diesel.’
    • ‘It is compact, though, and still looks terrific, and the new version has a lot of poke.’
    • ‘Yes it provides a bit of poke, but it would be nice if this 1.6l engine could provide more than its quoted 95PS.’
    • ‘With plenty of poke, fluid handling and more interior space than an airport terminal, the Mondeo swallows my two sprogs and all their concomitant mess with ease.’
    • ‘There is bags of power from way down the rev range and loads of poke in the middle where it is needed for safe overtaking.’
  • 4A woman's bonnet with a projecting brim or front, popular especially in the early 19th century.

    • ‘A Pennsylvania Amish in a poke bonnet goes next, happy as a bug.’

Phrases

  • be better than a poke in the eye (with a sharp stick)

    • humorous Be welcome or pleasing.

      ‘I got a tax rebate—not a huge amount but better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick’
      • ‘He's better than a poke in the eye with a burnt stick.’
      • ‘Getting hold of that is certainly better than a poke in the eye with a burnt stick.’
      • ‘Not a huge amount but better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick.’
  • poke fun at

    • Tease or make fun of.

      ‘this film pokes fun at Stalinism and the army which supported it’
      • ‘It poked fun at all the seriousness that reality TV has become, and it made stereotypical reality TV scenes into comedic segments.’
      • ‘Laurel has a remarkable ability to poke fun at whatever she's insecure about.’
      • ‘What fun it must have been for the young film-maker to poke fun at the older formula films, and their songs!’
      • ‘My feelings of anger and disgust, but even stronger emptiness, stopped me from poking fun at all my usual subjects.’
      • ‘Did I fancy writing a series of short articles poking fun at all the horrendous food that nobody ate any more?’
      • ‘I had been out to since sixth grade, not to my family of course, and had had my share of being teased and poked fun at but a few words dropped here and there and it was settled fast.’
      • ‘A send-up should be smarter than the films it pokes fun at, but that isn't the case here.’
      • ‘This is a film that pokes fun at itself and doesn't take itself too seriously.’
      • ‘One recent editorial cartoon pokes fun at just how widespread that practice has become.’
      • ‘My middle name smacks of big slobbery dog jokes and yet my last name was the one kids poked fun at in school.’
      mock, make fun of, laugh at, make jokes about, ridicule, jeer at, sneer at, deride, treat with contempt, treat contemptuously, scorn, laugh to scorn, scoff at, pillory, be sarcastic about, satirize, lampoon, burlesque, parody, tease, taunt, rag, make a monkey of, chaff, jibe at
      View synonyms
  • poke one's nose into

    • informal Take an intrusive interest in.

      ‘it's not like you to poke your nose into areas that don't concern you’
      • ‘Assuming that my regular schoolwork doesn't kill me, I'll see what I can poke my nose into as far as mysterious magical mischief makers go.’
      • ‘If we don't help, we're sitting by, being selfish; if we help too much, we're poking our nose into somebody else's business.’
      • ‘I could have trammed up to the river or down to the beach, but both seemed a little too far away today, so I wandered aimlessly in semi-suburbia, poking my nose into odd shops and leaving without buying anything.’
      • ‘He had poked his nose into all her private affairs from the start, so why shouldn't she return the compliment?’
      • ‘It's also possible to go round the old manor house, to poke your nose into all the barns and have a look at the old farm equipment.’
      • ‘You can poke your nose into other people's business, usually without getting it punched.’
      • ‘Oddly enough, though, he has something in common with the foreigner who owns much of the British media - he pokes his nose into the country's politics from thousands of miles away!’
      • ‘At home he has always poked his nose into everything that was going on and we are all mad about him’
      • ‘Also we tend not to get involved in some of the ‘intra-blog battles’ that rage across the web but they can be illuminating sometimes and are often fun to poke your nose into now and then.’
      • ‘I don't poke my nose into other people's business.’
      pry into, interfere in, nose around in, intrude on, butt into, meddle with, tamper with
      View synonyms
  • take a poke at someone

    • 1informal Hit or punch someone.

      • ‘Plus, there are these guys I had a bit of an altercation with last week who'd love to take a poke at me, and I ain't about to help them out.’
      • ‘Greengrass came barreling into second like a football blocker this time and I came up thinking I might as well take a poke at him.’
      • ‘But, like his twin before, he too took a poke at me, which just barely missed as I ducked behind mom, who was frowning in disapproval.’
      • ‘There are advantages and disadvantages to this; the advantage is that, done in a crowded situation, you don't have to be the immediate suspect if you take a poke at someone whose back is turned.’
      1. 1.1Criticize someone.
        ‘he took a poke at the tournament's sponsors, a cigarette company’
        • ‘Cruelty to Intel now seems to be socially-acceptable, while taking a poke at AMD is right up there with fox hunting and baby seal clubbing.’
        • ‘Assuming everything goes as planned and Kerry and Edwards both show up for it, he has a chance to take a poke at Kerry.’
        • ‘She shows depth on the inspirational ‘Get Up Again,’ and the grown-up ‘Our Child,’ and takes a poke at her detractors on ‘You Will Never.’’
        • ‘And of course I couldn't resist taking a poke at Justice Moore and his Ten Commandments monument.’
        • ‘He also took a poke at Panday's popular statement of giving his blood, sweat and tears to build the UNC.’
        • ‘Here it was, Thursday, the fourth day I've had coffee with these fellows, and it's the first time I hear him take a poke at Ivan.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • poke about/around

    • Look around a place, typically in search of something.

      ‘she poked about in the cupboard for a minute or two’
      • ‘So I was poking around the Chronicle's annual survey of endowments.’
      • ‘Ramsey said search teams looked in burrows and sometimes poked around with sticks.’
      • ‘I'd spent much of the day poking around the village - my young cousin had found a bizarre rusty Victorian-style hook in the garden which had set me to thinking.’
      • ‘So if you're still poking around the beach in rolled-up trousers and a floppy hat, wishing you could get out to a reading or something, well, you can.’
      • ‘So while southern softies take their dogs for a stroll in the park, northern divers are poking about the wrecks of munitions ships in 40m, in search of unstable explosives for the barbecue.’
      • ‘We're still poking around to see what prompted Sherry's change of heart.’
      • ‘But he wasn't convinced and after a bit of poking around said he thought it was more likely to be osteoarthritis, arguing that my hip joints may have simply worn out.’
      • ‘Believe me, we scoured the countryside and poked around in every old cabin and mining shack we could locate.’
      • ‘But being the smart, sassy psychology student Ashton now is, he starts poking around, and soon people start dying.’
      • ‘Vittorio spies on Frank as he pokes around the parlor, searching for a hidden compartment.’
      • ‘It doesn't take much poking around the techie Web sites to find people dreaming hard about physical immortality.’
      • ‘Now we take this phenomenon for granted, but back in those early days, poking around inside a remote computer was heady business.’
      • ‘They don't like people poking around in their business.’
      • ‘We worship an awesome God in the blue states, and we don't like federal agents poking around our libraries in the red states.’
      • ‘I roll over and hear our daughter poking around the house in search of dyed eggs.’
      • ‘Is it really so bad that you'd go to the middle of Death Valley in order to not have studio suits poking around your set?’
      • ‘This still doesn't guarantee a clean sweep though, especially if I start poking around those uncharted corners of the web.’
      • ‘They rummaged rubbish heaps and poked around stacks of dried straw that lay against one part of the fence.’
      • ‘He and Hayden were poking around a monsoon drain on Number Thirteen, searching for Hayden's errant drive.’
      • ‘I sighed and poked about in the bushes, searching for some sort of knob or button that might turn on the sprinklers.’
      search, hunt, rummage, rummage around, forage, scrabble, grub, root about, root around, scavenge, fish about, fish around, rake around, feel around, grope around, nose around, ferret, ferret about, ferret around
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: origin uncertain; compare with Middle Dutch and Middle Low German poken, of unknown ultimate origin. The noun dates from the late 18th century.

Pronunciation

poke

/pəʊk/

Main definitions of poke in English

: poke1poke2poke3

poke2

noun

Scottish
  • 1A bag or small sack.

    ‘he fished out a poke of crisps from under the counter’
    • ‘More exotic Scots words would include stoorsooker pokes, for vacuum cleaner bags and tea-pokies for tea bags.’
    1. 1.1North American informal A purse or wallet.
      ‘his wallet's half out of his pocket—it comes to me that I might as well lift his poke’

Phrases

  • a pig in a poke

    • Something that is bought or accepted without first being seen or assessed.

      ‘the unwary were apt to buy a pig in the poke’
      • ‘To some extent the opposition has bought a pig in a poke here.’
      • ‘Managers sometimes bought a pig in a poke - not fully understanding what they were getting.’
      • ‘As far as I can see we're being asked to buy a pig in a poke.’
      • ‘It was obvious to many observers, that when the county council went for the Cocklebury Road site, they bought a pig in a poke.’
      • ‘And with a court that's divided 5-4 on so many of those cases, we're not willing to buy a pig in a poke.’
      • ‘I'm afraid I can't offer much information on the state of the company - they haven't spoken with me for ages so it's a bit of a pig in a poke.’
      • ‘The former mayor said: ‘People are being asked to vote for a pig in a poke - it is all so uncertain.’’
      • ‘Let us hope that they recognise a pig in a poke when it is offered to them.’
      • ‘I would like to know more about the whole thing and I don't intend voting for a pig in a poke.’
      • ‘For most people, buying an air ticket is buying a pig in a poke.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old Northern French poke, variant of Old French poche ‘pocket’. Compare with pouch.

Pronunciation

poke

/pəʊk/

Main definitions of poke in English

: poke1poke2poke3

poke3

noun

  • 1

    another term for pokeweed
  • 2A North American plant of the lily family with a poisonous black rhizome and tall sprays of yellow-green flowers.

Origin

Early 18th century: from Algonquian poughkone (see puccoon).

Pronunciation

poke

/pəʊk/