Main definitions of poise in English

: poise1poise2

poise1

noun

  • 1Graceful and elegant bearing in a person.

    ‘poise and good deportment can be cultivated’
    • ‘The key to your personal success in this effort is to use poise, grace and tact.’
    • ‘His movements are smooth but slow, almost lazy, yet somehow identical to his sister's feline-like poise, except his behavior is much colder.’
    • ‘Apparently, she figured that if I were her daughter, she'd have made sure that I was the embodiment of elegance and poise, not to mention maturity.’
    • ‘Dancers have already noticed increased poise, grace, and fitness, and welcome the safety aspect, saying ‘Donna keeps an eagle eye on all of us’.’
    • ‘His language is deceptively simple; it is not easy to recreate his elegance and poise.’
    • ‘This hunt will not only spot young talent but also help in grooming their poise, sense of style and transform them into faces millions will one day admire.’
    • ‘There are days when the majesty, poise, skill, style, poetry and romance of Gaelic football just takes your breath away and then there are games like this when the opposite is the case.’
    • ‘After setting up his lone amp and tuning two guitars, he played with the same quiet and graceful poise that I remembered seeing in Amherst.’
    • ‘Despite this, she was a ballet dancer who had the grace, poise, and elegance of an angel.’
    • ‘Also Miss Gumerova very quickly revealed her poise and elegance.’
    • ‘And now I knew the names of most of the foods set before me, spoke with elegance and poise, danced with grace, and could even say a few words in French and Italian!’
    • ‘Also, a heightened sense of balance is extremely attractive - people start moving like ballet dancers, with poise and grace.’
    • ‘Elegance and poise are qualities not often seen in these days of post-grunge celebrity.’
    • ‘The prayer is nothing but an expression of these manifestations and, with graceful poise, combines all of them.’
    • ‘It creates poise and grace of movement, thereby literally enabling people to walk the talk with a new ease.’
    • ‘Her work goes beyond pathos, and whilst it seems paradoxical to speak about beauty, or even to use an oxymoron like ‘terrible beauty’, her work has a disquieting elegance and poise.’
    • ‘For a player his age, he has excellent footwork and ballhandling skills, and his poise and leadership abilities are well beyond his years.’
    • ‘An affection for the blunt speech of brute common sense often gives her poems the plain poise of wisdom literature, lanced with slides and swerves that leap from her alert musicality.’
    • ‘The male body has also been subjected to regulation and restriction: the eighteenth century saw an emphasis on poise and elegance centred round an image of a slim, restrained body.’
    • ‘Camaraderie, competitiveness and poise characterized the 2002 women's tennis team.’
    balance, equilibrium, control, grace, gracefulness, presence
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Composure and dignity of manner.
      ‘at least he had a moment to think, to recover his poise’
      • ‘Dawson recovered his poise to take a couple of wickets and pace sensation Steven Kirby wrapped things up by grabbing the last three wickets in the space of 18 balls at a cost of just four runs.’
      • ‘Clyde recovered their poise sufficiently to make their first concerted raid in seven minutes when Allan Grant's cross forced McDonald to concede a corner at the far post.’
      • ‘The actress could have been degraded by the exploitation material, but somehow she punches through the stereotypes and retains her dignity and poise.’
      • ‘And he displayed great composure and poise in a loud environment in reality our first road game of this year.’
      • ‘She handled herself with poise and dignity and did not shy from any of the issues.’
      • ‘If I was Dravid, I would have never allowed a down-and-out team to recover its poise and be in a position to sting us back.’
      • ‘In the printed version of the lecture he has recovered his poise.’
      • ‘I think the family has shown remarkable dignity and poise throughout this entire ordeal.’
      • ‘The HKMA head was unwilling to be drawn into talking about subsequent losses, but with markets still recovering their poise during May, the fund's losses seem set to mount.’
      • ‘She as well able to deal with male chauvinism while losing none of her dignity and poise, Mr McCarthy said.’
      • ‘After a reconciliation in the royal family and the reunification of the Whig party in 1720, the ministry recovered its poise, and the Whig Ascendancy was not only restored but extended.’
      • ‘I left with as much poise and dignity as I could, keeping my face a tranquil mask as I lost myself in the crowd and headed for the bathroom.’
      • ‘By their physiques, thankfully the majority retain poise and dignity.’
      • ‘Slowly he recovered his poise enough to murmur.’
      • ‘He descended to raucous and tasteless personal attacks on the Gandhis and generally showed little dignity, poise or gravitas.’
      • ‘They can only hope that the markets recover their poise.’
      • ‘Hayden never recovered his poise and four overs later was out to Jones, who beat his chest in delight.’
      • ‘Many of the firm's customers believe the company will recover its poise, largely thanks to the superiority of its products.’
      • ‘I was very impressed with her poise and composure.’
      • ‘After 30 minutes in recovery, the patient had recovered her poise and sense of humour.’
  • 2archaic Balance; equilibrium.

    ‘the balance has passed the point where the spring is in poise’

verb

  • 1Be or cause to be balanced or suspended.

    [no object] ‘he poised motionless on his toes’
    [with object] figurative ‘the world was poised between peace and war’
    • ‘Bethany and Anna both poised themselves in front of the paper.’
    • ‘With studied patience and precision, he poised the loop on a pencil and flattened its creases, extricating the tape from extinction.’
    • ‘Between snatches it was not idle, sailing out to intercept a passing fly, then poising in the air with rapidly whirring wings as it neatly picked an insect from the underside of a leaf.’
    • ‘Finally, all turned, slowly glided and pitched down, poising with uplifted wings momentarily before merging into the dusk.’
    • ‘He poised his face in a poker like style, trying to copy Kira.’
    • ‘‘We are at your service, madam,’ he said, poising his fingertips together above his stomach.’
    • ‘‘Alright’, she started, poising the pen in her hand over the pad of paper.’
    • ‘A little shaky from all the adrenaline, I poise the ball of one foot on the pedal.’
    • ‘He also took a seat, and readied his materials, inking his quill and poising his hand.’
    • ‘‘Wow, Chelsea’, Peter said, pushing up the frames of his glasses up with one hand as he poised a pencil over a page with the other.’
    • ‘‘Coming,’ I replied, poising myself at the edge of the stack.’
    • ‘The pointe shoe has come on the ballet scene in recent years and allows the dancer to poise indefinitely on tiptoe.’
    • ‘I poised my pen over the paper unsure of whether to write back or not.’
    • ‘As you make ready to enter, the direct-lift machine does not touch the ground; it poises motionless under its whirling rotor blades like a gigantic hummingbird.’
    • ‘I like to keep the fingertips pointed forward, better poising this hand to engage in a two-hand hold or to ward off a last-instant physical assault.’
    • ‘Yet, as we all know, popular art would be nowhere without the perpetual, inconclusive drama of crossing the line - poising at the edge of the abyss, sometimes pulling back, sometimes falling in.’
    • ‘She fell almost immediately after leaping onto the balance beam and then had to poise herself moments later as she nearly went off again.’
    • ‘He checked himself, hand poised a width from the fledgling's back.’
    • ‘She shakily holds it and poises the pen over the paper.’
    • ‘At intervals one and then another checked the pace, poising with wings uplifted and vibrating and tail depressed and expanded.’
    balance, hold steady, hold oneself steady, steady oneself, be suspended, hang suspended, remain motionless, hang in mid-air, hang, hover
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Be ready and prepared to do something.
      [with infinitive] ‘teachers are poised to resume their attack on government school tests’
      • ‘So you add the pieces up and we are poised for escalation.’
      • ‘The benchmarks, which have tumbled for six days, are still poised for a second successive quarter of gains.’
      • ‘The incumbent platforms are not yet ready to fade away and we are now poised for a period when new equilibriums will be established.’
      • ‘At the same time, helicopter-borne special forces teams are poised for what is likely to be a prominent role in the next phase of the war.’
      • ‘Two determined teams faced off for the quarter but Air Force was poised for victory with another winning combination.’
      • ‘Like Rome itself, the producers have spent a fortune rolling out what they hope is an all-conquering format that will run and run, and everything is poised for series two.’
      • ‘Hull is poised for major changes to its secondary school education, having already embarked on a series of primary school closures.’
      • ‘Text messaging, a huge success for the mobile phone business, is now poised for take-off via fixed lines as well, with some intriguing implications.’
      • ‘He commented that the US economy is poised for recovery, although protracted because of geopolitical factors and trade wars.’
      • ‘More than 4,000 people were poised for evacuation today after flood defences on the River Derwent were breached two miles from Howden, near Selby.’
      • ‘That money is simply being put to one side, for now at least, until investors see some clear indication that the global economy is poised for a recovery.’
      • ‘But proponents say it is also poised for a comeback.’
      • ‘He also thinks that ITV is poised for a recovery.’
      • ‘While England is poised for a fierce row over plans to site five million extra homes on its countryside, Scotland's population is due to either fall slightly or remain static.’
      • ‘But to generalize from there to a secret cabal of Muslims in the military poised for terrorist action is more than a little bit of a stretch.’
      • ‘The price of physical gold is poised for a strong second half.’
      • ‘Nikki was poised for several stressful weeks of preparation.’
      • ‘We're poised for dynamic growth and we're committed to helping you succeed.’
      • ‘Opposition peers are poised for the fourth time in a row to defy the Commons and insist the Yorkshire trial can only go ahead if the North-West is taken out of the proposals altogether.’
      • ‘State legislators are poised for a spending spree - on stadiums and prisons’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘weight’): from Old French pois, peis (noun), peser (verb), from an alteration of Latin pensum weight, from the verb pendere weigh. From the early senses of ‘weight’ and ‘measure of weight’ arose the notion of ‘equal weight, balance’, leading to the extended senses ‘composure’ and ‘elegant bearing’.

Pronunciation:

poise

/pɔɪz/

Main definitions of poise in English

: poise1poise2

poise2

noun

Physics
  • A unit of dynamic viscosity, such that a tangential force of one dyne per square centimetre causes a velocity change one centimetre per second between two parallel planes separated by one centimetre in a liquid.

Origin

Early 20th century: from the name of Jean L. M. Poiseuille (1799–1869), French physician.

Pronunciation:

poise

/pɔɪz/