Definition of point of honour in English:

point of honour

noun

  • An action or circumstance that affects one's reputation or conscience.

    ‘he languished in jail refusing, as a point of honour, to talk’
    • ‘This was a point of honour for him, and he was glad she'd noted it.’
    • ‘It a point of honour with them not to leave the club until they were thrown out.’
    • ‘Consistency is a point of honour to most religious leaders and he is no exception; if you have spent years studying religious texts to deliver fatwas, you don't often change your mind.’
    • ‘I make it a point of honour to proceed along very classical lines so that I do not displease our great politicians and wise leaders.’
    • ‘People kill each other in revenge, for a point of honour.’
    • ‘And there's almost a trend away from Michelin stars now in Paris: top chefs opening simple old bistros, failing to do them up as a point of honour, then serving world-class food for about £18 a head.’
    • ‘Thus it becomes a point of honour that he topple her from her lofty spinster throne.’
    • ‘Some service stations don't stock them at all and it is a point of honour amid the paper-tossing fraternity that nobody worth their stripe ever took aim with a roll of honey blush-coloured Velvet.’
    • ‘So packing just essentials and taking as little luggage as possible on any trip has become something of a point of honour with me.’
    • ‘Each of the students made it a point of honour to have the worst results in that subject.…’
    • ‘The Red Army's ranking general in the field made it a point of honor to be the last Soviet soldier to leave.’
    • ‘As a point of honour he knew not to interfere with the fight.’
    • ‘It is a point of honour on the Indian frontier not to leave wounded men behind.’
    • ‘For all that, it had become a point of honour for Polish pianists to drop quotations from it during improvisations by way of winding up the authorities.’
    • ‘I myself make it something of a point of honour to stick rigorously to the selected viewpoint.’
    • ‘After all, it is a point of honour never to concede the superior insights of the French, especially when they are generalising about their own superiority.’
    • ‘It's now a national point of honor to hold a parade after a war.’
    • ‘It was a point of honour for the early modern avant-gardes to be rejected by the establishment, and to have their work thus marked as radical, subversive, and ahead of its time.’
    • ‘Solicitors generally make it a point of honour to assist litigants in person to get through the process partly of course because it is generally in the broader interests of their own clients in the litigation.’
    • ‘She made it a point of honor to never use a chair in exactly the right way.’