Definition of poetic in English:

poetic

adjective

  • 1Relating to or used in poetry.

    ‘the muse is a poetic convention’
    • ‘Rather than abjuring claims to poetic vision, her poetry pretends not to aspire to authority even as it quietly seizes it.’
    • ‘For poets and those who read poetry, the poetic form can be relatively obscure as a discipline and as an art.’
    • ‘Most of his writing has been in XILOTL and is often poetry or poetic prose.’
    • ‘In the world of language and poetic rhythm, Tipperary is a name made in heaven.’
    • ‘These are the very veins of poetic stuff; poetry which runs all false and true.’
    • ‘An important point that can be made about Shahid's poetry is that it drew as much upon English poetic traditions as it did on Urdu literary forms.’
    • ‘Its poetic quality lies not in ornamentation but in rhythm.’
    • ‘Adam invites into our midst a deeply lyrical, sorrowful and unforgettable poetic voice.’
    • ‘His prose is rhythmical and often poetic; individual sections contain carefully balanced and readily memorable phrases.’
    • ‘The rhythmic quality and easy flow of the poetic forms allow the reader to feel the life in these characters in a powerful way.’
    • ‘Those who knew nothing of the poetry knew of the face in the least poetic of contexts when they opened a cigar box.’
    • ‘I then used their poetic forms and wrote about a third of the book in that style of verse.’
    • ‘Traditional in form, her poetry treats primarily romantic themes with elevated, poetic language.’
    • ‘She also wrote a book called Music of Speech about the relationship between poetic rhythm and speech which probably influenced her approach to ritual.’
    • ‘Anger always makes for good poetic verse, so pick up thy pens and write. I expect to see verses two, three and possibly four in the coming weeks.’
    • ‘In the process of discovering and translating Hebrew poetry a Russian poetic community was formed.’
    • ‘Such feelings become ‘embodied’ for me in the poetic form, in its sounds and rhythms.’
    • ‘The beginnings of any kind of valid poetry or poetic stirrings in Australia date into the present century.’
    • ‘The writing is rhythmic and poetic and the characters so real that you long to know what became of them in later life.’
    • ‘Their argument was that a whole new set of poetic strategies was needed to keep poetry alive in modern times.’
    in verse, verse, metrical, rhythmical
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Written in verse rather than prose.
      ‘a poetic drama’
      • ‘Browning's earliest poetic work, written under the spell of Shelley, was treated as a not very good joke.’
      • ‘Her poetry is reminiscent of the soft tones in the poetic works of Frances Cornford or Charlotte Mew.’
      • ‘To match Jones's visual effects Jonson wrote poetic dialogue of the highest order.’
      • ‘American poet Samuel Ullman wrote this poetic essay called Youth in 1910.’
      • ‘His single portraits have the economy of poetic drama, but they escape the limitations of their black borders.’
      • ‘Its director, Guka Omarova, makes an auspicious debut with this taut, raw, poetic drama.’
      • ‘Shapiro does not offer monologues or narratives but poetic dramas in which multiple voices are allowed on the stage.’
      • ‘He wrote one other poetic drama, The Famous Tragedy of the Queen of Cornwall.’
      • ‘Most of this literary work consisted of epics and love stories written in poetic form.’
      • ‘Unless, that is, you spent the mid-Nineties ticking off the more poetic dramas mounted by the Royal Shakespeare Company.’
      • ‘The show melds modern dance techniques and poetic prose narrative to illustrate her desperation.’
      formal, written
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Having an imaginative or sensitively emotional style of expression.
      ‘the orchestral playing was colourful and poetic’
      • ‘His songs are catchy, his lyrics poetic and probing, and he is handsome.’
      • ‘The lyrics are passionate and poetic, the musical arrangements full of juxtaposition and surprise.’
      • ‘Besides having a tune, these words are actually imaginative and poetic.’
      • ‘It could be set in the east, but it wouldn't be as poignant and poetic and elegiacal.’
      • ‘And here he was representing one of history's most ruthless dictators as a dreamy, soft, poetic, kind of chap.’
      • ‘You have the space to be creative, poetic, artistic and sensitive.’
      • ‘The sight is beautifully poetic and expresses the leitmotiv tension between heaven and earth.’
      • ‘Lyrics should be poetic, concise, imaginative, theologically strong and expressive of worship to God.’
      • ‘Extravagant designs that look theatrical, dramatic and poetic are given heavy emphasis.’
      • ‘The tunes are creations of spellbinding joy and the lyrics poetic enough to turn men with steel hearts to jelly.’
      • ‘I love dialogue that sounds beautiful; dialogue that is lyrical and poetic.’
      • ‘Although similar from track to track, the lyrics are poetic and occasionally touch on more meaningful issues within society.’
      • ‘A poetic, provocative choreographer, her work continually challenges aesthetic conventions.’
      • ‘He plays this raw, emotional indie-folk with poetic, symbolic lyrics.’
      • ‘His technical facility is astounding but, more importantly, he is a sensitive, poetic artist.’
      • ‘The thundering guitars, melodic vocals and poetic lyrics seemed to transcend classification.’
      • ‘The numerous space and controlled organisations of poetic colours lend subtlety to his part collage-part paintings.’
      • ‘All aesthetic expression has a poetic quality and is essentially eulogistic.’
      • ‘In time, he became better known as a sculptor with a strong poetic bent, rather than as a poet in the traditional sense.’
      • ‘Lyrically poetic and understated, this album has a churchly feel that makes for perfect nighttime chillout music.’
      expressive, figurative, symbolic, flowery, moving, aesthetic, artistic, tasteful, graceful, elegant, elevated, fine, beautiful
      View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French poétique, from Latin poeticus ‘poetic, relating to poets’, from Greek po(i)ētikos, from po(i)ētēs (see poet).

Pronunciation

poetic

/pəʊˈɛtɪk/