Main definitions of poach in English

: poach1poach2

poach1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Cook (an egg) without its shell in or over boiling water:

    ‘a breakfast of poached egg and grilled bacon’
    • ‘The potato pancake was nicely browned and served as a sponge for the toppings of just-wilted spinach, slices of pink-as-a-tongue ham and a perfectly poached egg, just oozing yellow loveliness.’
    • ‘Eat a healthy breakfast that includes whole-grain breads or cereal with lowfat milk, fresh fruit, and some form of protein, like poached eggs or ham.’
    • ‘Marie enjoyed a plate of perfectly poached eggs, toasted bread and strips of bacon.’
    • ‘To poach the eggs, cook them for between 45 seconds and a minute, spooning the white over the yolk.’
    • ‘And then six eggs are poached for three minutes once the broth starts to boil again for a second time.’
    • ‘If you have poached the eggs ahead, using a slotted spoon, transfer them to a pan containing enough boiling hot buttery water to cover.’
    • ‘Salt in the water when poaching eggs will set the white quickly.’
    • ‘Put some water in the pan and cover to steam, so as to poach the egg inside the bowl.’
    • ‘In the breakfast room, over poached eggs, she talks wittily and uninhibitedly.’
    • ‘To poach the eggs, pour 3.5cm of boiling water into a clean frying pan or saucepan and place it over a low heat - the water should show a few bubbles on the base of the pan, but no more.’
    • ‘To poach the eggs, fill a large skillet about two-thirds full with water, to a depth of about 2 inches.’
    • ‘First poach the eggs.’
    1. 1.1 Cook by simmering in a small amount of liquid:
      ‘poach the salmon in the white wine’
      • ‘While the salmon is poaching, melt the butter in a small saucepan and cook the onion for five minutes till softened but not browned, then stir the flour into the juices and cook for another minute or two.’
      • ‘Place pork belly in a roasting pan, cover with water and poach in oven for 10 hours.’
      • ‘The food to be poached must be fully immersed in the liquid and not allowed to boil otherwise it can toughen the most delicate protein.’
      • ‘Luckily I didn't need to use the oven anyway as I'd brought some cod for dinner so it was just a case of poaching it in some milk doing some mashed potatoes, peas and a poached egg to top it off.’
      • ‘Wrapping the chicken in clingfilm before poaching it in the boiling water seals in the chicken juices so that the meat is succulent and moist.’
      • ‘The menu covers all eventualities, from salads and burgers to open sandwiches, steaks and chicken, as well as grilled and poached salmon.’
      • ‘Add the raspberries and peaches and poach for 5 minutes.’
      • ‘This fish is ideal for poaching, as it's soft and tender.’
      • ‘Which brings me rather neatly to my main course - advertised as poached fillet of salmon with dill and Muscadet, it sounded like a perfect light evening meal.’
      • ‘To poach the fish, put the lemon juice in a shallow pan with enough lightly salted water to cover the fish, then bring to the boil.’
      • ‘She poaches the chicken to make a flavorful broth.’
      • ‘The best way to cook scallops is to grill, fry or poach them for no more than a couple of minutes.’
      • ‘Popular in much of Eastern France, these sausages are cooked by poaching in water or red wine before being served with a sauce, or a potato salad, or cold, sliced and seasoned with a mustardy vinaigrette and sliced onion.’
      • ‘Poach the dumplings in the syrup until they float to the top, about ten minutes.’
      • ‘In a small saucepan, she poached some tangy California dried apricots in some water with a bit of sugar to serve atop the chicken and rice.’
      • ‘About 5-10 minutes before the lentils are ready, put the whole sausage in the water and poach it until it is warmed through.’
      • ‘Poach pears in red wine until tender; remove from wine and drain.’
      • ‘Reduce heat, put in the pears and poach gently for 25 minutes, until tender.’
      • ‘Sea bass is very versatile and can be poached, steamed, roasted or grilled.’
      • ‘Baking, broiling, or poaching fish will help you avoid extra calories from breading and frying.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French pochier, earlier in the sense enclose in a bag, from poche bag, pocket.

Pronunciation:

poach

/pəʊtʃ/

Main definitions of poach in English

: poach1poach2

poach2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Illegally hunt or catch (game or fish) on land that is not one's own or in contravention of official protection:

    ‘20 tigers are thought to have been poached from national parks’
    ‘he might arrest you for poaching’
    • ‘You may even have 200,000 orang-utans, you still are going to lose them very, very fast with this amount of hunting and poaching and I'm not yet including the orang-utans that were hunted for bush meat.’
    • ‘Zambia is endowed with abundant wildlife, but the country has failed to benefit from the rich game resources due to increased poaching activities which have led to extinction of certain species.’
    • ‘Baited explosives are used to hunt pigs while dynamiting is the most popular method employed to poach fish.’
    • ‘If an individual is found to be in possession of an illegal trout either through poaching or exceeding their bag limits, their catch and all their tackle will be immediately confiscated.’
    • ‘Along some nesting beaches 100 percent of the eggs are poached.’
    • ‘Hundreds of thousands of elephants were illegally poached and their tusks sold for profits.’
    • ‘She sets traps to try and poach fish from the local pond and checks them daily.’
    • ‘Tiger poaching commenced on a large scale in Northern India in the 1980s.’
    • ‘For more than 200 years, the high value of ivory and other elephant products have made hunting and poaching ongoing facts of life for elephants, both in Africa and in Asia.’
    • ‘After the turn of the 20th Century, the fast decline in the number of tigers was mainly due to poaching and hunting.’
    • ‘Giant pandas are also poached - killed illegally - as their pelt carries a high price in the black market.’
    • ‘Former buyers no longer think it ethical to buy items made of ivory because they believe it encourages elephant poaching.’
    • ‘‘These programmes work because they give people an incentive to protect wildlife rather than poach it,’ Weaver added.’
    • ‘I think we have to differentiate here between those deer that have been legally shot at and those that have been illegally poached and there is a distinct difference.’
    • ‘At Chen Rio, another camping spot, soldiers patrol the beach stopping tourists from poaching turtle eggs that are protected by law.’
    • ‘Tribals and natives who know the forests well do much of the tiger poaching.’
    • ‘Most elephant poaching today appears to be in the heavily forested region of Central Africa, Milliken says.’
    • ‘The four orang-utans and two gibbons were returned to Indonesia after being illegally poached and smuggled to Japan eight months ago.’
    • ‘In the past, some local residents poached sea turtle eggs to sell in the lucrative black market for their supposed magical and aphrodisiac powers.’
    • ‘Is the Minister aware of serious concerns in the Australian fishing industry about the impact of illegal fish poaching on our fish stocks?’
    hunt illegally, catch illegally, kill illegally, trap illegally, plunder
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Take or acquire in an unfair or clandestine way:
      ‘employers risk having their newly trained workers poached by other firms’
      • ‘Countries try to poach good athletes and great coaches.’
      • ‘It has no more right to do this than it has the right to abolish compensation payments between businesses when one company poaches a senior executive who is under contract to another.’
      • ‘After many false starts and a lot of poaching of good people from the IT sector, 2004 was the year when mobile operators finally started to understand what their corporate customers want from them.’
      • ‘The supermarket giant has apologised after trying to poach top chefs from some of Manchester's best restaurants.’
      • ‘He scored two points last Saturday but is well capable of poaching more and is also a great assist player.’
      • ‘Micko has been poached by another county, basically.’
      • ‘Here's the idea - lurk around on a few discussion boards and poach some of the good ideas you see there.’
      • ‘Businesses will even more ruthlessly poach skilled workers off each other.’
      • ‘‘It is a fact that we have people in other firms trying to poach my staff telling them not to trust the big employer,’ he said.’
      • ‘It is a big challenge to protect trees when land is poached for development and trees are cut.’
      • ‘After redecorating, the joint reopened earlier this month, with a new chef - poached from the Cantonese restaurant next door - and new partners.’
      • ‘The mining firms are so desperate for employees that they are poaching them from each other.’
      • ‘The company has poached several staff from companies including international phone maker Ericsson.’
      • ‘Let's face the facts, this town will hardly attract a large following, it is not alone in the lower divisions, they are fodder for the large wealthy clubs, who will always poach good players once they become obvious on the park.’
      • ‘Last year, the company was forced to award a 17 percent pay increase to its drivers, in an effort to stop them being poached by other train operators.’
      steal, appropriate, purloin, misappropriate, take
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2[no object] (in ball games) take a shot that a partner or teammate would have expected to take:
      ‘in doubles, you're poaching when you advance into your partner's territory’
      • ‘A doubles tennis player may win by poaching all of the time, but will his partner enjoy the game?’
      • ‘However, his pace and the occasional flash of poaching ability should be good for 10 goals or so this season.’
      • ‘Now he looks fitter, quicker and stronger and followed up his European goal against 1860 Munich by poaching two more penalty box strikes as Leeds beat the reshaped Blues 2-0.’
      • ‘His idea of defense is to try to block shots or poach the passing lanes.’
  • 2(of an animal) trample or cut up (turf) with its hoofs:

    ‘zero-grazing saves the fields from poaching’
    • ‘We have had our cows out since March but we have had to take them in again because they were poaching the land.’
    • ‘This was achieved after improved park management contained the destructive annual fires and reduced livestock grazing and poaching.’
    • ‘There has been a temptation on some farms to roll fields that have been badly poached.’
    • ‘Livestock poaching during the incessant wet weather and machinery operations on soft ground has done enormous damage to grass swards.’
    1. 2.1[no object] (of land) become sodden by being trampled:
      ‘if the ground is liable to poach the cows come inside’
      • ‘Was it overgrazed, undergrazed, poached or closed too late?’
      • ‘As well grazing land was being damaged by poaching because of the very wet conditions.’
      • ‘Open swards are more liable to poaching so greater care is needed.’
      • ‘The pitch quickly became poached and neither side found it conducive to constructive play.’
      • ‘The objective is to minimise poaching, overgrazing and soil erosion as this can lead to siltation and nutrient enrichment of surface waters.’

Origin

Early 16th century (in the sense ‘push roughly together’): apparently related to poke; sense 1 is perhaps partly from French pocher enclose in a bag (see poach).

Pronunciation:

poach

/pəʊtʃ/