Definition of pneumatic drill in English:

pneumatic drill

noun

British
  • A large, heavy mechanical drill driven by compressed air, used for breaking up a hard surface such as a road.

    • ‘The newly-diagnosed disease causes fingers to turn white and numb as a result of using hand-held vibrating tools such as pneumatic drills and jigger picks.’
    • ‘There are lengths of road in this town where hardly a month goes by without a gang of men arriving with pneumatic drills and temporary traffic lights.’
    • ‘Television footage showed yellow-suited rescuers with headlights using their hands and small pneumatic drills to break through concrete floor slabs and pulling victims on stretchers from collapsed homes and apartments’
    • ‘The sound of a pneumatic drill perforates the air.’
    • ‘She could hear the beat of a diesel engine and bursts from a pneumatic drill.’
    • ‘A workman below was using a pneumatic drill to break up some concrete which had already been laid.’
    • ‘It doesn't help that he is going deaf and that a pneumatic drill is hammering away just outside the window.’
    • ‘He acknowledged that noise from building activities was ‘unpleasant, particularly during short periods in which pneumatic drills, for instance, must be used’, but he said there was ‘no magical solution’ to high noise levels.’
    • ‘These inventions, together with the diamond drilling crown and the pneumatic drill, drastically reduced the cost of blasting rock, drilling tunnels, building canals and many other forms of construction work.’
    • ‘The place throbbed to the rhythm of pneumatic drills as dozens of new tourist complexes took shape to cater for local demand.’
    • ‘The court heard the noise outside his house was equivalent to a pneumatic drill going off through the night and was four times the recommended limit for sleep disturbance.’

Pronunciation

pneumatic drill

/njuːˌmatɪk ˈdrɪl/