Definition of plug into in English:

plug into

phrasal verb

  • 1(of an electrical appliance) be connected to another appliance by a lead inserted in a socket:

    ‘you can buy a camera which will plug into your video cassette recorder’
    • ‘It's really the simplest thing - a small, high quality screen which plugs into the phone socket.’
    • ‘These can be stand-alone systems or they can be a component that plugs into your computer.’
    • ‘This comes into my computer via a modem which plugs into a USB socket.’
    • ‘The trigger set plugs into the computer's serial port and includes a hand glove and a footpad.’
    • ‘The receiver plugs into the controller socket and must match the channel number you're using.’
    • ‘The downside is that a Socket 940 CPU won't plug into a Socket 939 motherboard, or vice versa.’
    • ‘This comes with some electric cord that plugs into the camera body and has a shoe plate at the end of it that slips over the foot of your flash.’
    • ‘These CPUs plugged into a socket called Socket 754.’
    • ‘This gives customers a fairly painless way to double the processor count of their servers, as the module plugs into existing sockets.’
    • ‘Very simplified, it's the speed that the CPU socket, where it plugs into the motherboard, runs at.’
    1. 1.1 Gain or have access to a system of computerized information:
      ‘we plug into the research facilities available at the institute’
      • ‘It seems that our whole economy is being run by groups of people gathered in grey buildings on the edges of towns plugged into phone systems.’
      • ‘So, whereas this process used to keep her informed of what was going on, it almost immediately becomes common knowledge to those plugged into the website.’
      • ‘For example, when people join the evolt mailing list, they're instantly plugged into vast amounts of knowledge for free.’
      • ‘If British troops are to fight ‘shoulder to shoulder’ with the Americans, then they have to be plugged into the same hi-tech systems.’
      • ‘Ideally, anyone plugged into the system should be able to go down the checklist and create a desired result.’
      • ‘Will it be possible for Movable Type and TypePad users to plug into a non-SixApart authentication system?’
      • ‘Will it be possible for Radio users to plug into a non-Userland scripting system?’
      • ‘People who use the Internet are interested in fast responses, so they plug into that speed-driven system and find what they want.’
      • ‘Most, she believes, will be ‘virtual’ adventurers, plugging into computer-simulated cyber-trips rendered with astonishing clarity.’
      • ‘And that is what we're doing with the police department, being able to plug into their system of receivers that enhance the signal under those difficult conditions and send it on.’
    2. 1.2 Become knowledgeable about and involved with:
      ‘the workshops are a great way to plug into radical ideas and radical groups’
      • ‘Upmarket furniture dealers have also plugged into the trend, setting up experience centres to create a live-in ambience for various rooms.’
      • ‘Instead of plugging into the boob tube, I chose to increase my study of our ancient and holy Jewish texts and plug into a fountain of spiritual knowledge.’
      • ‘For Lischner, the experience of being plugged into an existing team showed other potential hiring weaknesses.’
      • ‘In order to charge things up, to imbue them with our good will and intention, we need to feel connected and plugged into the energy of the earth.’
      • ‘As such, it can be enjoyed by regular cinema-goers and loved by eager fans if they plug into the nostalgia for the defining cinematic experience they had in 1991.’
      • ‘The public is more plugged into what's happening in the second leg, and former optimism begins to turn to questioning and even gloom.’
      • ‘Keep tabs on all the latest position battles and injury information, stay plugged into training camp developments, and adjust your rankings accordingly.’
      • ‘Far from being crazy, the oil executive had simply been citing what was common knowledge to anyone properly plugged into the pace of events in southern Africa.’
      • ‘In the world of elite sport, knowledge is power, as increasingly coaches and administrators are plugging into high-tech strategies to boost performance.’