Definition of playlist in English:

playlist

noun

  • 1A list of recorded songs or pieces of music chosen to be broadcast on a radio show or by a particular radio station.

    ‘the station is confident that the new playlists will please listeners’
    • ‘Did you actually think that there's someone employed to painstakingly think up playlists for radio stations and write them up by hand or something?’
    • ‘They're just looking for music they can no longer find on the tight playlists of their local radio stations.’
    • ‘Listeners from all over the North East jammed the lines to ask Mike Parr to have the song put on the radio station's playlist.’
    • ‘Seeing that music radio has degenerated into playlists of 100 songs, the time is right to take broadcasting out of the studios of the radio programmers and put it in the hands of the commuters.’
    • ‘At a time when radio playlists are tighter and any kind of exposure is hard to come by, 365,000 copies of my work now will be heard.’
    • ‘During the past several years we have successfully introduced artists who couldn't find space in conventional music stores or on traditional radio playlists.’
    • ‘Billboard's hot 100 chart, which has been published for 50 years, is compiled from a national sample of sales reports and radio playlists.’
    • ‘Commercial radio's playlists are focused largely on just five formats: country, pop, solid gold, classic rock and news.’
    • ‘With Southern and Midwestern rappers rising to prominence over the past few years, the birthplace of hip-hop has only constituted about a third of rap radio playlists.’
    • ‘As long as the money is flowing, vastly superior artists on relatively humble independent label budgets are pushed off of big radio's playlists from day one.’
    • ‘So, I've decided to start putting up playlists from my radio show, partly so I can remember just what I play each week.’
    • ‘They would be the ever-changing, hard - but clearly not impossible - to pin down youth stations, where the playlists change as often as the musical fashions.’
    • ‘Radio playlists have been shrinking and TV stations are playing fewer videos.’
    • ‘Marketing/promotion decisions, image-creation, and radio station playlists are all built around how artists and their music are perceived.’
    • ‘The rationale for the alternative rock station is to provide Dubliners aged 18 to 34 with an antidote to the pop-saturated playlists on existing stations.’
    • ‘Why are commercial radio playlists so short and boring?’
    • ‘It provides a way for good bands to reach big audiences directly, bypassing the gatekeepers and their straightjacketed radio playlists.’
    • ‘In a few weeks it'll no doubt be populating radio station playlists everywhere and will be impossible to escape.’
    • ‘They argue that in a rapidly consolidating industry increasingly dominated by a few major broadcasters, many local radio stations employ cookie-cutter formats and limited, music playlists.’
    • ‘We know that a playlist is a named list of songs with a title.’
    1. 1.1 A list of digital files to be played on a portable media player, computer, etc.
      ‘you can stream tracks or save playlists to your phone to listen offline’
      • ‘You can just create and edit real playlists on the phone.’
      • ‘Smart Playlists allow you to create your own playlists by specifying an unlimited number of criteria.’
      • ‘The core functionality of an on-demand music player was extended with playlist management and music updates.’
      • ‘You can manipulate the music in the playlist, or in individual albums, as if they were all one massive CD.’
      • ‘The user can listen to stored music using playlists or listen to streaming Internet radio.’
      • ‘Being a beta program, it doesn't provide a graphical user interface (GUI) for creating and manipulating playlists.’
      • ‘Playlists are managed by creating a text file that contains the full path to all the MP3s you want to play.’
      • ‘It can even open your media player, load the playlist and play the files in track order.’
      • ‘The new player acts as a Web radio tuner and a jukebox that allows users to create playlists.’
      • ‘You are ready to slalom down an awesome ski slope, with an adrenaline-pumping playlist cued up on your MP3 player.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Place (a song or piece of music) on a playlist.

    ‘he was furious when they declined to playlist his hit’
    ‘playlisting can be a significant factor in any record's career’
    • ‘They have musicians' playlists, and a whole lot of ‘essential’ lists.’
    • ‘Modern versions of this kind of studio could allow various sound and video clips to be playlisted and cued in manually.’
    • ‘So what does Doug think of the reaction so far, both from the radio stations which have playlisted their tracks, and from the fans?’
    • ‘These tactics make personal mashups and portable playlists a mass phenomenon.’
    • ‘BBC Radio 2 is to increase its live music output, launch a major new songwriting initiative and give artists greater support by playlisting albums.’
    • ‘We compare various methods of party playlisting.’
    • ‘When your track is instantly playlisted by the big guns it's only a matter of time before you have a hot summer smash on your hands.’

Pronunciation

playlist

/ˈpleɪlɪst/