Main definitions of placer in English

: placer1placer2

placer1

noun

  • [often as modifier] A deposit of sand or gravel in the bed of a river or lake, containing particles of valuable minerals:

    ‘placer gold deposits’
    • ‘Gold is found in a wide variety of geologic settings, but placer gold and gold veins are the most economically important.’
    • ‘Erosion of the rocks around the dikes created Arizona's richest placer deposits, and the site of Arizona's greatest gold rush.’
    • ‘Because of their resistance to weathering, they accumulate on shale slopes and sometimes form small placer deposits in stream beds.’
    • ‘This province is among the leaders in lode gold production and is also a significant source of placer gold.’
    • ‘This is followed by chapters devoted to the general characteristics of bedrock and placer gold.’
    • ‘These pioneer prospectors practiced surface mining, obtaining gold from the alluvial deposits called placers.’
    • ‘However, the Colombian mines remained the only source of platinum until the discovery of the Russian placer deposits in the 1820s.’
    • ‘Fourteen specimens are obviously from placer deposits.’
    • ‘Lode gold deposits and related placers located in the southern part of the upper Yana basin form a special group.’
    • ‘Other exhibits focus on placer and lode deposits, major gold rushes, and uses of gold through the centuries.’
    • ‘The state heavily pushed gold miners toward it; a special governmental decree even authorized free placer gold prospecting and mining.’
    • ‘Prospectors equipped with picks, shovels, and the ubiquitous gold pans searched for placer deposits - loose flakes and nuggets that have eroded and washed into streams.’
    • ‘Prices will fluctuate and, for low-end matrix specimens and most placer gold, will be keyed to the prevailing spot price of gold.’
    • ‘Currently, some of the known deposits (mainly bar placers with easily recoverable gold) are mined by prospector cooperatives.’
    • ‘For example, about 80 percent of the world's tin deposits occur as unconsolidated placer deposits in riverbeds and on the seafloor.’
    • ‘Thus gold can be mined either from lode or from placer deposits.’
    • ‘Under the YPA and Mining Land Use Regulations, placer miners must restore the land and any fish-bearing streams.’
    • ‘A knob of the granite that is known as Granite Mountain is a prominent landmark, and most of the placer deposits are in washes draining this feature.’
    • ‘There is also the situation with placer reserves.’
    • ‘This work has helped to increase the efficiency and profitability of Yukon placer mines in spite of rising production costs and low gold prices.’

Origin

Early 19th century: from Latin American Spanish, literally deposit, shoal; related to placel sandbank, from plaza a place.

Pronunciation:

placer

/ˈpleɪsə/

Main definitions of placer in English

: placer1placer2

placer2

noun

  • 1[with modifier] A person or animal gaining a specified position in a competition or race:

    ‘last year's fifth placer had a good run’
    • ‘A section of experts have been saying that since Pakistan beat India without him, there is hardly any need of a world class placer who might create problems for the team management.’
    • ‘The Wicklow placer raced into a 7-nil lead, but the young Moone player got more into the game and was soon on level terms with some great service and passing shots.’
    • ‘Iron Jay is urging all the top placers from the Olympia to compete at the Arnold.’
    • ‘Unlike other events where only the top placers get awards, everyone who finishes gets an award.’
    • ‘Among the first of the top placers to test their mettle against the course was O'Connor on the mare Wyndham, who came home with only 2.6 time penalties.’
    • ‘He was third in the hammer won by Hull's Smith, but with the second placer from Southern Ireland he secured the second international spot.’
    • ‘There are also $60 satellite games held on most days once the main game has finished, during which the top ten placers win a free seat!’
    • ‘The first placers of this race received instant 1000 baht prize money and were very happy for their first piece of luck in the races.’
    • ‘The second and third placers will receive $1,500 and $1,000.’
    • ‘Indeed, for the third and fourth placers, it was their first trips outside their home land.’
    • ‘Sunday early evening saw a dinner at Nang Nual Restaurant in Jomtien where officials handed out trophies to the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd placers in each class.’
    • ‘Before the finals they organized a betting pool on who the top two placers would be.’
    • ‘Instead, a micro Ducati motorcycle would be taking the top placer on his victory lap.’
    • ‘Nonetheless, I do firmly believe that with all that money pouring in, the English FA could spread it around to all the teams, with the lowest placers getting a slightly larger percentage.’
  • 2A person who positions, sets, or arranges something:

    ‘he was a shrewd placer of the ball’
    • ‘He had a strong, consistent serve, he was an accurate placer of the ball, and could lob and volley with equal panache.’
    • ‘Kinship by design allowed agency workers to distinguish themselves from both commercial and humanitarian child placers.’
    • ‘His strong points were as a microphone placer and a recorder - he really captured some really great sounds on tape.’
    • ‘Sometimes the producers went to absurd lengths to protect their advertisers and product placers, pixelating one of the inmates T-shirts to cover up a rival furniture product.’
    • ‘Second, they are acknowledging you are a good placer.’
    • ‘Personals placers aren't exactly defying defined cultural roles; most women wrote ads seeking economic security, while men sought younger, attractive partners.’
    • ‘In the early years of the century, there were hundreds of child placers in the United States.’
    • ‘For example, many ad placers wrote that they enjoyed walks by the beach though their Utica, New York, town is 170 miles from the Atlantic.’
    • ‘One could be a shooter, one could be a back-up shooter in case the shooter's balls go, and a placer as well as a back-up shooter.’
    • ‘Child placers who acted out of ignorance were all too prone to confusing love with money, and those motivated by money obviously overlooked love entirely.’
    • ‘Until standards were firmly in place, child placers would stumble along with nothing to guide them but trial and error.’
    • ‘Cwla members understood that commercial child placers frequently appealed more effectively than they did to birth mothers, and knew they had to compete more vigorously.’
    • ‘Like testers intent on detecting feeble-mindedness among students, immigrants, and soldiers, child placers welcomed intelligence as a proxy for social status.’
    1. 2.1 A person who puts the material ready for firing in a pottery kiln.
      • ‘Telling tales about working as a pottery placer at Gladstone Pottery Museum during Victorian times, he has been entertaining audiences of all ages.’
  • 3British informal A dealer in stolen goods.

Pronunciation:

placer

/ˈpleɪsə/