Main definitions of pip in English

: pip1pip2pip3pip4pip5pip6

pip1

noun

  • 1A small hard seed in a fruit.

    • ‘Strain the liquid off carefully through muslin making sure that no pips or pulp get through.’
    • ‘For a more modest production run, take one pint of double cream and grate the rind of two lemons into it, plus the pips.’
    • ‘Sometimes, time chews up your memories and spits them out like grape pips.’
    • ‘And it's really good - heavy on the lemons and probably a little heavy on the pips too but it tastes great.’
    • ‘They can be blocked by phenolic compounds, which are already known to be found in the pips and skin of grapes.’
    • ‘Our grandchildren planted some Braeburn apple pips and they have all grown.’
    • ‘I quite like oranges, but the pips spoil them, and peeling them is hard work.’
    • ‘Some foods, especially fruit skins and pips can swell in the gut causing blockages.’
    • ‘You can propagate by division, from proliferations or pips, or from seed.’
    • ‘Cut each passionfruit in half and scoop out the pips and pulp with a small spoon into a sieve set over a bowl.’
    • ‘Some winemakers go so far as to crush the pips of the grapes in order to extract as much bitter tannin as possible.’
    • ‘At first I think the firemen were a bit bewildered but after 20 minutes or so on their hands and knees they were finding seed pips.’
    • ‘This machine breaks the skins of the grapes but doesn't press them, and removes all stalks and some of the pips.’
    • ‘Place the fruit, rind and pips in a large bowl and cover with cold water.’
    • ‘That explains why all the fruit has nasty pips in it.’
    • ‘The daughter puts some raisins in the mother's mouth after removing their pips.’
    • ‘Let the oranges cool then cut into quarters, remove pips and any hard stalk.’
    • ‘We both have grapefruit pip stories from our childhood, but in Joanna's case the pips grew into trees for 35 years without producing a flower or fruit!’
    • ‘It has hard flesh and many pips and is too sour and astringent to eat raw; but it has a delicious fragrance and when cooked with adequate sweetening develops a fine flavour and turns pink.’
    • ‘However, weather can trick the plant, meaning sugar levels can indicate ripeness while the pip of the grape remains hard or green.’
    seed, stone, pit
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1South African The stone of soft fruits such as peaches and plums.
      • ‘Another item that caught my eye concerned a pupil at the first DLS school in King William's Town, Joe Mullen, who swallowed a plum pip in 1905 which stuck in his windpipe.’

Phrases

  • squeeze someone until the pips squeak

    • informal Extract the maximum amount of money from someone.

      • ‘The Left are still wedded to silly ideas about squeezing the rich till the pips squeak.’
      • ‘And at the same time it would create a nice comfortable monopoly on waste disposal all the better for jacking up fees and squeezing rate payers till the pips squeak.’
      • ‘The owners of some 660 horses face a frustrating and expensive new year because Horse Racing Ireland is going to squeeze them until the pips squeak.’
      • ‘Finally, here are Gartner's recommendations to squeeze your networking equipment supplier until its pips squeak.’
      • ‘Popular pressure in Britain and France encouraged the peacemakers to squeeze the German lemon until the pips squeak, a line most vigorously pursued by the French premier, Georges Clemenceau.’
      • ‘As we reveal today, Labour is planning a dramatic rebanding of council tax which would squeeze middle-class households until the pips squeak.’
      • ‘A moment that signalled that the middle market had been squeezed so dry the pips had begun to squeak.’
      • ‘The arguments are solidly made, and Microsoft's lawyers squeeze the juice out of their case until you can hear the pips squeaking: but in the end, there's just not enough juice.’
      • ‘So he and his coalition partners found that when they said, ‘We'll make the Hun pay ’, and the famous phrase, ‘We'll squeeze them until the pips squeak,’ that went over a lot better.’

Origin

Late 18th century: abbreviation of pippin.

Pronunciation:

pip

/pɪp/

Main definitions of pip in English

: pip1pip2pip3pip4pip5pip6

pip2

noun

  • 1British A star (one to three according to rank) on the shoulder of an army officer's uniform.

    • ‘The other man was solidly built, and dressed in a black uniform, two golden pips on each shoulder, and with his hands gloved in a similar black.’
    • ‘I did not even have time to get out of the door before a man in a white shirt full of shoulder pips and a stern look on his face appeared to warn me off taking action.’
    • ‘She found herself with captain's pips on her collar at the tender age of eighteen.’
    • ‘Personnel were walking every which way behind the command station, which held a beautiful, buxom blonde wearing captain's pips.’
    • ‘He was in full dress uniform, black with golden pips and a red beret.’
    • ‘I noticed that all-important pip on his shoulder.’
  • 2Any of the spots on a playing card, dice, or domino.

    • ‘All previous decks had shown pips like a normal pack of playing cards.’
    • ‘To score, the pip value of each card in a row, column or diagonal is summed.’
    • ‘Remember that an exposed double scores the total of its pips.’
    • ‘The total pips revealed denotes the team's score.’
    • ‘For purpose the picture cards count 12 and 11 and the pip cards have their face value.’
    • ‘They include a bizarre grand piano, not only reconstructed by Philip Webb but in addition decorated by Kate Faulkner with playing-card pips, mottoes and whorls of gilt gesso-work.’
    • ‘In both cases, the players who did not domino score the total of the pips on the tiles left in their hand.’
    • ‘The number of pips showing on the ten are the units digit of the score, and the total number of pips showing on the Jack and Queen (which may be face up or face down) are the tens digit.’
    • ‘Each domino with 10 pips - - is worth 10 points to the side that wins it in their tricks.’
    • ‘Some players count the pip cards 2 to 9 as all worth 5 points.’
    • ‘The cards are arranged on the table so that the number of pips showing shows the team's current score.’
    • ‘Joker has no value at the finish, and deuce has only pip value.’
    • ‘Each player gets the total number of pips left in his hand.’
    • ‘Most of the pip card are worth their face value, which is added to the value of the pile.’
    • ‘In the diagram, the match has just ended because E & W have 12 pips.’
    • ‘At the end of the hand, each player gets the total number of pips in his hands.’
    • ‘Numeral cards have roman numbers and can also be recognised by counting the pips.’
    • ‘If the game is blocked, the partnership with the smallest total of pips on their tiles gets one point for the round.’
    • ‘Any combination of cards adding up to 15 pips scores 2 points.’
    • ‘Joker can't be used, and deuce can only be used as pip value.’
  • 3An image of an object on a radar screen.

    • ‘In the HEADING-UPWARD display, the target pips are painted at their measured distances in direction relative to own ship's heading.’

Origin

Late 16th century (originally peep, denoting each of the dots on playing cards, dice, and dominoes): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

pip

/pɪp/

Main definitions of pip in English

: pip1pip2pip3pip4pip5pip6

pip3

noun

usually the pips
British
  • A short high-pitched sound used especially to indicate the time on the radio or to instruct a caller using a public telephone to insert more money.

    • ‘When logging off, the device will emit three short pip sounds to indicate testing has finished.’
    • ‘He heard the pips of a radio time-signal as he neared the kitchen.’
    • ‘We made do with the pips on digital Radio 2, and the engaged burr of mobiles as the servers overflowed.’
    • ‘No, I wanted to know the real time, checked daily against the daily 8am BBC Radio pips.’

Origin

Early 20th century: imitative.

Pronunciation:

pip

/pɪp/

Main definitions of pip in English

: pip1pip2pip3pip4pip5pip6

pip4

noun

  • [mass noun] A disease of poultry or other birds causing thick mucus in the throat and white scale on the tongue.

    • ‘Rearing turkeys was no easy job even in small numbers and diseases such as pip and gape took their toll despite good care and attention.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Middle Dutch pippe, probably from an alteration of Latin pituita slime. In the late 15th century the word came to be applied humorously to unspecified human diseases, and later to ill humour.

Pronunciation:

pip

/pɪp/

Main definitions of pip in English

: pip1pip2pip3pip4pip5pip6

pip5

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • (of a young bird) crack (the shell of the egg) when hatching:

    ‘as the eggs are being pipped the female clucks’
    • ‘The first chicks will start to pip the shell as early as the 19th day of incubation.’
    • ‘Each pipped egg was measured and put in a portable heating unit at 37 deg C until it hatched’

Origin

Late 19th century: perhaps of imitative origin.

Pronunciation:

pip

/pɪp/

Main definitions of pip in English

: pip1pip2pip3pip4pip5pip6

pip6

verb

[WITH OBJECT]British
informal
  • 1 Defeat by a small margin or at the last moment:

    ‘you were just pipped for the prize’
    • ‘His comments come after a survey named Elvis as having the most iconic hairstyle - pipping David Beckham for the crown.’
    • ‘In the semi-finals, Gregson took the final pink to pip Mark Dodds 64-56, while York first teamer Gall beat York second teamer Dave Sanderson 51-39.’
    • ‘They were none too pleased to be pipped by just one point in the final round.’
    • ‘There was the same result in the breaststroke while, in freestyle, Sean reversed the placings, narrowly pipping his brother.’
    • ‘To my eye the Coupe just pips the Roadster as the ultimate modern classic.’
    • ‘Cedric Botha just managed to pip Des Barnard in the C division.’
    • ‘She finished with silver having controlled from the start only to be pipped on the line.’
    • ‘Here, Leeds were just pipped by three points by rivals Bingley Harriers.’
    • ‘Millions of viewers voted for their favourite, with Will pipping rival Gareth Gates in the final.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the socialists were pipped into second place by the National Front by 0.7 %.’
    • ‘Brave Ranger 9/4 finished strongly to just pip Sallins Prince for second place by a head.’
    • ‘Inverness only pipped Clyde on the final day for the First Division title.’
    • ‘Shearer also picked up the goal of the season award for his volley against Everton and just pipped City's Darren Edmondson to the prize.’
    • ‘And the 25-year-old may one day pip Armstrong in Paris.’
    • ‘The Laois team came fourth in the competition and were narrowly pipped by first two points for third place.’
    • ‘But the best comeback was by White, who came from 36-31 down to pip Andy Buckley.’
    • ‘Last year was the second hottest on record, pipped only by 1998.’
    • ‘He didn't just pip the previous record, he's beaten it out of sight.’
    • ‘Ireland's team made a heroic effort and were just pipped for the bronze medal.’
    • ‘Thus on the last day he only needed to pip Hargan by one second to claim the yellow jersey.’
    1. 1.1dated Hit or wound (someone) with a gun:
      ‘he pipped one of our fellows through the head yesterday’

Phrases

  • pip someone at (or to) the post

    • Defeat someone at the last moment:

      ‘I was pipped at the post in the men's finals’
      • ‘He just sneaked into the lead and won it and then the final was very close but Paul pipped them at the post.’
      • ‘Perhaps if she were more willing to put out she would have pipped Pepys at the post.’
      • ‘Having beaten off a number of other councils to reach the final, Burnley was pipped at the post for first prize by South Lanarkshire.’
      • ‘The final kick in the final second of a heart-stopping afternoon saw Melrose pip Peebles to the post.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, she is disappointed that Matthew was pipped at the post by Nathan, who, she says, was later revealed to be an experienced model.’
      • ‘Having looked a winner, Quinn was pipped at the post by Scot David Sneddon.’
      • ‘Ireland qualified two teams for the quarter-finals, were unlucky when Ulster were pipped at the post for a third.’
      • ‘But when I went round to my then girlfriend's, I discovered her ex had pipped me to the post with half a dozen red roses.’
      • ‘Sadly, she was pipped to the post by Pam from Preston.’
      • ‘But Sam Allardyce revealed today that Hoddle was pipped at the post when he could have won the race by a distance.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from pip or pip.

Pronunciation:

pip

/pɪp/