Main definitions of pink in English

: pink1pink2pink3pink4pink5pink6

pink1

adjective

  • 1Of a colour intermediate between red and white, as of coral or salmon.

    ‘bright pink lipstick’
    ‘her face was pink with embarrassment’
    • ‘She had snow white skin, pink cheeks, and coal black hair.’
    • ‘The walls were painted a pale almost fleshy pink colour (what might be described as anaemic salmon).’
    • ‘It was made from felt or something - light pink flesh coloured stuffed material with brown curls fanning out.’
    • ‘My nose is an attractive pink colour, as are my cheeks.’
    • ‘Bear in mind, too, that the rosy pink colour of this product is produced by feeding the fish chemical dye.’
    • ‘Remove the pink corals from the white scallops then wrap strips of smoked salmon round the sides of the scallops.’
    • ‘On closer inspection, I noticed that his tail was droopy, and one of this back legs seems to be very pink under the white socks.’
    • ‘The skin should be smooth and have a white or light pink colour.’
    • ‘You get a very intense light coming off these clouds as the sun reflects on them, with colours of bright pink yellow and intense white at the core.’
    • ‘We are standing in a spacious kitchen painted a dusky pink colour that, were it a lipstick or nail varnish, would be called Plum Beautiful or Berry Sorbet.’
    • ‘Some of the later flowering hybrids are more unusual in their colour with pink trumpets and white petals.’
    • ‘Maureen Brennan was the height of summer fashion in a beautiful white skirt and pink top.’
    • ‘Walker, wearing a light pink skirt and white shirt, showed little emotion as her sentence was read out at Manchester Minshull Street Crown Court.’
    • ‘I turned back to the mirror, taking in my smoky eyes and light pink lipstick, with rosy cheeks.’
    • ‘Skin white as porcelain and rosy pink cheeks, not too distinct, dances in the light.’
    • ‘Her glass carriage was drawn by four white horses decorated with pink plumage and two coach men dressed in white suits, pink ties and top hats.’
    • ‘With its pink colour, it was originally intended as the definitive women's drink, though that role is now occupied by the rather less prosaic Red Bull and vodka.’
    • ‘I have chuckled at conservative white men in pink shorts.’
    • ‘Everything remains white, less a pink shag rug, and two paintings of Lower East Side landscapes from an artist I met at a bar.’
    • ‘Hot pink hearts on white paper are always a big hit.’
    rosy, rose, rose-coloured, rosé, pale red, salmon, salmon-pink, shell-pink
    flesh-coloured, flushed, blushing
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(of wine) rosé.
      • ‘She could pour pink champagne in her CPU and I'd open it up and take a blow dryer to it without a grousing word.’
      • ‘Smith concurs when it comes to upping his inventory of salmon-coral and deep hued pink wines.’
      • ‘A good rose is hard to find and this will satisfy many who like to drink a pink wine with buffets and Oriental meals.’
      • ‘Is the Bordeaux area too grand to produce a popular, everyday pink wine?’
      • ‘For my own part, I cannot remember ever tasting so many bottles of pink wine.’
      • ‘Spain also takes pink wines seriously - so seriously that it has at least two names for them, depending on the intensity of the colour.’
      • ‘Maybe it wasn't all pink champagne and roses last night after all.’
      • ‘The bad news this year is that the pink champagne of choice is harder to find than usual.’
      • ‘Eventually, the trucker is seduced into turning up at a motel with a bottle of pink champagne, expecting to find the sexy chick from the CB.’
      • ‘The pink wine is favored in that sun-basked region for its refreshing crispness and ability to pair up with a wide variety of foods.’
      • ‘Today I watched her eat an entire tub of cottage cheese and drink three glasses of pink Champagne.’
      • ‘If you really want to see each other through rose-coloured spectacles this February 14th, you could opt for pink champagne.’
      • ‘Make it pink champagne, girlfriend - because you're worth it.’
      • ‘There we dined on charcuterie, cheese, fish and humous accompanied by a variety of fresh breads and pink champagne with strawberries.’
      • ‘I would recommend it to anyone… along with the pink champagne they serve there.’
      • ‘If I gave the cork count when I met a participant there was always a giggle and a comment ‘only the finest pink champagne’.’
      • ‘Today, pink wine sales are increasing in France and the United States, as well as in Britain.’
      • ‘If you are still not convinced about pink wine, then what about a terrific red with a name that suggests it's a rosé?’
      • ‘‘Blah, blah, blah,’ muttered Texas behind her tall glass filled with hot pink champagne.’
      • ‘The good news is that just as still pink wines have become respectable over the past decade, slowly so has rosé champagne, with more care taken over its production.’
  • 2informal, derogatory Having or showing left-wing tendencies.

    ‘pink politicians’
    • ‘However, the pink revolution failed with the victory of a hardliner.’
  • 3Of or associated with homosexuals.

    ‘a boom in the pink economy’
    ‘the pink pound’
    • ‘As consumers, gay men are unusually powerful - the pink pound and so on.’
    • ‘Number of pink pounds in their income: 60 billion, according to Barclays Bank.’
    • ‘It is surely the last thing the tourism industry needs as it chases the pink pound, and every shade of pound, too, for that matter.’
    • ‘Perhaps more importantly, the realisation that both the pink pound and pocket money were untapped, encouraged the wave of celebrity media around today.’
    • ‘Otherwise, it will remain an Irish Sicily, loyal to the half-crown when it should be chasing the pink pound.’
    • ‘Punters cashing in their pink pounds to the sound of second-rate pop groups is not really my thing.’
    • ‘A pink triangle was for men charged with acts of homosexuality.’
    • ‘On the other, the victim gays seek to deny the power of the pink pound and prefer to present gays as poor and downtrodden.’
    • ‘There is a massive wedding market in the Borders and a lot of hotels are going to try and cash in on the pink pound.’
    • ‘Bent The film version of Martin Sherman's searing stage play stars Clive Owen as a gay inmate of Dachau who denies his homosexuality and is given a yellow rather than a pink star to wear.’
    • ‘Since the late 1990s event organisers have attempted to cash in on the pink economy.’
    • ‘The bank likes to brag about how much business it turns down and the pink pound is likely to be far more valuable than the radical Christian pound, anyway.’
    • ‘Scottish businesses are gearing up to cash in on the pink pound at the country's first ever gay-only wedding exhibition.’
    • ‘I'm fed up with this convenient courting of the pink pound - I don't want to be equal just because I'm financially valuable!’
    • ‘The pink pound is about to gain more currency in Scotland.’
    • ‘Manchester city council also realised the potential value of the pink pound and the importance of specialist events for attracting tourists.’
    • ‘But, shopping with, or indeed for, those paying with the pink pound, is certainly an amusing experience.’
    • ‘As one of the first people to spot the potential of the pink pound, he and his company were all over the gay papers which, just as soon as they discovered his photogenic looks, were all over him.’
    • ‘The Liverpool Echo reports local officials want a share of the pink pound, money spent by gay and lesbian visitors.’

noun

  • 1[mass noun] Pink colour, pigment, or material.

    ‘soft pastel shades of pink and blue’
    • ‘The best bets for backing are highlighted blue and for laying in pink.’
    • ‘I rushed upstairs, to find pretty bedrooms, in pink!’
    • ‘A younger woman dressed completely in pink followed her into the room.’
    • ‘As darkness drew near I joyfully and thankfully watched the pinks, purples, blues and golden colors of the sky melt together into a picture-perfect sunset.’
    • ‘Three tiny girls in pink with big beady eyes can these days be seen running around school corridors in Delhi.’
    • ‘And of course, as I'm all girl, I had to buy them in pink.’
    • ‘Becca's room, which the girl had proudly shown him, was sort of the same shade, but in pink.’
    • ‘We watched in anticipation each evening as the sun was swallowed by the horizon, gratified time and again by a dazzle of reds, pinks, oranges and purples and that evasive flash of green.’
    • ‘A few seconds later, a girl wearing a helmet and clad in pink on a Honda Activa smiled at me and stopped near me and said ‘Hi!’’
    • ‘Years ago I read Desmond Morris's The Soccer Tribe which said that no football team will ever play in pink because it makes them look a like a bunch of, well, blokes wearing pink.’
    • ‘If you happened to be patronising the inns of Kendal on Friday, you no doubt will have noticed a rather merry group of women dressed head-to-toe in pink.’
    • ‘They will bloom in pink for Louise and Gemma and in blue for Hayley because it was her favourite colour.’
    • ‘The living room was carpeted in pink and 2 beige sofas with blue pillows lined the corner.’
    • ‘She's a princess in pink, dripping with gold and crowned with a glittering tiara.’
    • ‘Tessa Skara, dressed in pink, was the first to take to the dimly lit stage.’
    • ‘Looking pretty in pink, the newly voted Mum of the Year was besieged by the paparazzi at every turn.’
    • ‘Similar pigments occur in pink, red, and, surprisingly, blue petals.’
    • ‘They come in pink, crimson and magenta, but my favourites are the blues.’
    • ‘The bundles will retail for £100 and made be available in pink or blue - says it all, really - giving the machine the same hue as toilet paper.’
    • ‘Ever since discovering eBay I have known that there were some rare issues of my suitcase in pink.’
    1. 1.1The scarlet jacket worn by fox-hunters or the material from which this is made.
      • ‘And unless it is granted, there will still be possible mayhem in hunting pink during the election campaign.’
      • ‘Just when hunting pink is to be outlawed, cagoule red is being given the green light today, with armies of walkers now allowed to wander across ‘private’ property’
      • ‘Banning battery farming would do a lot more good than banning hunting, but there isn't the emotional punch of watching Otis cry because he'll have to donate his hunting pink to Oxfam.’
      • ‘More than 1,200 of them including farmers, gamekeepers and riders in hunting pink warned that their action was the start of a ‘summer of discontent’ to highlight opposition in the countryside to the threatened ban.’
    2. 1.2[count noun]The pink ball in snooker.
      • ‘Coulson played a loose shot and Shipley gained the necessary points from a snooker and was left an easy pink and snooker after another Coulson error.’
      • ‘Lee won that on a respotted black and once Ding missed an easy pink in the next frame the balance shifted towards the Englishman, who went on to triumph.’
      • ‘Wayne Pulleston recovered recovered from being 40 points behind only to fail on the frame ball pink which handed Heworth's Dave Taylor the first frame.’
      • ‘There actually was a bright moment when Ebdon wildly mis-hit a pink and then put referee Colin Brinded's glasses on - it was actually funny at the time.’
      • ‘The pink went down next, the cue ball screwing around the table to bring him up on the black.’
      • ‘Stevens makes a break of 37 but misses a simple pink to the middle pocket.’
      • ‘The Whirlwind looked set to secure a comfortable victory in Glasgow at 4-2 up before he missed a pink to let Ian McCulloch in.’
      • ‘Williams misses a pink off its spot and Doherty steps in to claim another frame.’
      • ‘Hunter fought back from being 58-39 behind to win 63-58 with the aid of a superb snooker on the pink.’
      • ‘But he misses an easy pink to give O'Sullivan a glimmer of a chance.’
      • ‘A missed pink handed Higgins the ninth and he edged the final frame 68-53.’
      • ‘What happened in that dramatic 13 th frame was that Stevens got the yellow with a lucky glance off the pink only to snooker himself on the green.’
      • ‘Hunter missed a pink which would have made it 4-4, but snookered Williams in the process.’
      • ‘At his next visit he cut in the pink to win the frame 52-32 and thereby secure the match and the trophy for Bootham as 3-1 victors.’
      • ‘Williams outrageously fluked the green in the last frame of the session, but only won it after trapping O'Brien in a snooker on the pink behind the black.’
      • ‘He went 46-7 ahead before Whyte made a 14 break only for Milner to respond with his tenth red and a pink then laid a snooker.’
      • ‘‘The only worry I had was when Drew potted a pink and there was no spot to put it back on,’ said Tabb.’
      • ‘Drago conceded the 15th frame with several reds still on the table after missing a simple pink and then Ebdon finished off in style with a 105 clearance.’
      • ‘O'Sullivan eventually finishes it off with a long pink to take an early lead.’
    3. 1.3informal Rosé wine.
      • ‘It was certainly a night of pink, hearts, roses and fun and it was good to see the ladies of the YWCA in such great form.’
      • ‘Think and drink fashionable pink this season: rosé wines are making a comeback.’
  • 2The best condition or degree.

    ‘the economy is not in the pink of health’
    • ‘Its weight was 20 lb and it was in the pink of condition with a splendid coat.’
    • ‘Island Tina trained by Seamus Graham was sent away the 6/4 favourite but she was unfortunate to come up against Peter Spice in the pink of condition.’
    • ‘You will be in the pink of health and will experience an increase in wealth.’
    • ‘Instead, we are greeted by our waitress, Sandra, a student of literature in the pink of health.’
    • ‘Quite obviously, Weeraratne is in the pink of cricketing health right now and the Anthonians would surely have marked him down for early extinction.’
    • ‘If the last season was one in which all the batsmen were in the pink of form, the present season has shown them in terrible light with nobody able to hit the straps.’
    • ‘Batting-wise, Atapattu has been in the pink of cricketing health.’
    • ‘Pink is your colour this week, as you will be in the pink of health.’
    • ‘It is everybody's knowledge that the construction sector is not in the pink of health.’
    • ‘Suncroft owner Willie Delaney, really has his string in the pink of condition at the present time and is fast becoming a sprint specialist.’
    • ‘You will also be in the pink of health and will receive money or jewellery.’
    • ‘To make sure that your most prized rose garden is in the pink or even red of their health, simply follow these tips on rose care dealing with most of their health dilemma.’
    • ‘The good news is that Dato Star is in the pink of condition.’
    • ‘The one other individual sport where India has traditionally made its presence felt at the international level, tennis, is not exactly in the pink of health.’
    • ‘Kaikini is pushing 75, and not in the pink of health either.’
    • ‘The Congress veteran, K. Karunakaran's passion for politics is matched only by his keenness for keeping in the pink of health.’
    • ‘An unseen intruder tries to pull the plug on his life-support system but the guy is a lousy assassin - instead of dying, Alexander wakes up, attractive, rumpled and pretty much in the pink of physical health.’
    prime, perfection, best, finest, top form, height, highest level, upper limit, limit
    utmost, peak of perfection, uttermost, greatest, extreme, extremity, ceiling
    epitome, apex, zenith, acme, bloom, blossoming, flowering, full flowering
    ne plus ultra
    View synonyms

verb

  • 1[no object] Become pink.

    ‘Cheryl's cheeks pinked with sudden excitement’
    • ‘Finally, Eve realized she was staring, and her cheeks pinked.’
  • 2Australian NZ [with object] Shear (a sheep) so closely that the colour of the skin is visible.

    ‘McFowler pinked every sheep and never drew blood’

Phrases

  • in the pink

    • informal In extremely good health and spirits.

      • ‘One of Bradford's biggest professional firms is in the pink after snapping-up a Leeds-based rival.’
      • ‘Mr Ramsden said today: ‘We are absolutely in the pink now it's back.’’
      • ‘The hope is that when markets finally bounce they will be back in the pink.’
      • ‘A few changes to your eating habits, like avoiding fried and other fat-laden foods, can keep those tiny penile arteries clog-free - and keep you in the pink.’
      • ‘But something tells me, despite all the vicissitudes, setbacks and struggles of a long career, that she will still be in the pink.’
      • ‘On the football side, however, Arbroath this season have simply been in the pink.’
      • ‘This keeps doctors in the pink, so to speak, and gives the sisters opportunity to discuss at length which medicos hands are colder than the others.’
      • ‘But you know, usually with a little extra TLC and a lot of extra sleep hopefully; dads take note, most news moms start to feel pretty much in the pink within a couple of weeks.’
      • ‘For many firms, health care design is in the pink.’
      • ‘It kept them in the pink, as all exercise does, even if they did not win a prize at a meet.’
      in good health, in perfect health, very healthy, very well, hale and hearty, bursting with health, in rude health
      blooming, flourishing, thriving, vigorous, strong, lusty, robust, bounding, in fine fettle, fit, in tip-top condition, in excellent shape
      View synonyms
  • turn (or go) pink

    • Blush.

      ‘I felt myself go pink’
      • ‘The immense, treelike Trina Mack stood up next, her tan face gorgeous as it turned pink with a blush.’
      • ‘She bit her lip to stop the amused smile from spreading when he blushed at her playfulness, answering as his cheeks went pink.’
      • ‘The girl went pink in the face when Rae talked back.’
      • ‘He missed a race and went pink with embarrassment then red with anger after being escorted off Knavesmire by burly security guards following an alleged hand-bag snatch.’
      • ‘I greeted him cheerily and his face turned pink, which, I remember, didn't go well at all with the green and blue.’
      • ‘She blushed a bit, her pale skin turning pink around her cheeks.’
      • ‘Well I was all ready to tell my story, when I saw him, a new face in that common crowd, he was a really cute guy and as I saw him, I blushed my cheeks turning pink, and I knew he was the one.’
      • ‘Then Sara watched him watch her, her cheeks flushing and his ears turning pink.’
      • ‘Katherine's face turned pink, causing her green eyes to glow.’
      • ‘Gabrielle's pale face went pink but she quickly looked away.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from pink, the early use of the adjective being to describe the colour of the flowers of this plant.

Pronunciation:

pink

/pɪŋk/

Main definitions of pink in English

: pink1pink2pink3pink4pink5pink6

pink2

noun

  • A herbaceous Eurasian plant with sweet-smelling pink or white flowers and slender, typically grey-green leaves.

    clove
    • ‘Grape hyacinths, Pulmonaria, rock cress, azaleas, lilacs, wallflowers and pinks furnish nectar in early and mid-spring.’
    • ‘A brief overview of the different characteristics of carnations, pinks, and sweet Williams will perhaps help you to make wise choices for your garden.’
    • ‘These included lilacs, lindens, Virginia creeper, marigolds, sunflowers, honeysuckle, pinks, and daisies.’
    • ‘As edging plants I'd use chives, compact Alpine strawberries and edible flowers such as old-fashioned pinks, violas and marigolds.’
    • ‘Don't plant daisies, pinks, dianthus and carnations.’

Origin

Late16th century: perhaps short for pink eye, literally ‘small or half-shut eye’; compare with the synonymous French word oeillet, literally little eye.

Pronunciation:

pink

/pɪŋk/

Main definitions of pink in English

: pink1pink2pink3pink4pink5pink6

pink3

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Cut a scalloped or zigzag edge on.

    ‘a bonnet with pinked edging’
    • ‘Ornamental gauntlets with swirling embroidery and pinked edges were patented by F. Farrant.’
    • ‘Fancier edge stitches could include binding with Lycra, blanket stitch, pinking, overcast with the serger, or turning under and stitching.’
    1. 1.1Wound or nick (someone) slightly with a weapon or missile.
      ‘Bernstein pinked him in the arm’
  • 2archaic Decorate.

    ‘April pinked the earth with flowers’

Origin

Early 16th century (in the sense ‘pierce or nick slightly’): compare with Low German pinken strike, peck.

Pronunciation:

pink

/pɪŋk/

Main definitions of pink in English

: pink1pink2pink3pink4pink5pink6

pink4

noun

historical
  • A small square-rigged sailing ship, typically with a narrow, overhanging stern.

    • ‘A pink was a sailing ship with a narrow stern, originally small and flat-bottomed.’

Origin

Late 15th century: from Middle Dutch pin(c)ke, of unknown ultimate origin; compare with Spanish pinque and Italian pinco.

Pronunciation:

pink

/pɪŋk/

Main definitions of pink in English

: pink1pink2pink3pink4pink5pink6

pink5

verb

[NO OBJECT]British
  • (of a vehicle engine) make a series of rattling sounds as a result of over-rapid combustion of the fuel–air mixture in the cylinders.

    ‘the car was inclined to pink slightly in accelerating from a low engine speed’
    ping
    • ‘Eventually I gave up trying to accelerate hard because the engine started pinking, which seemed to get worse as time went by, so maybe it was running below par.’
    • ‘Between lines, Tioxide is not denying that TC30 could cause pinking but considers it is Hydropolymer's problem not ours’.’
    • ‘This is known as pinking, and can be identified by a knocking sound coming from the engine.’

Origin

Early 20th century: imitative.

Pronunciation:

pink

/pɪŋk/

Main definitions of pink in English

: pink1pink2pink3pink4pink5pink6

pink6

noun

dated
  • [mass noun] A yellowish lake pigment made by combining vegetable colouring matter with a white base.

Origin

Mid 17th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

pink

/pɪŋk/