Main definitions of pine in English

: pine1pine2

pine1

noun

  • 1An evergreen coniferous tree which has clusters of long needle-shaped leaves. Many kinds are grown for the soft timber, which is widely used for furniture and pulp, or for tar and turpentine.

    Compare with fir
    • ‘The interior landscape is planted with Korean pines 50 to 65 feet in height.’
    • ‘For example, when Czech designer Josef Halda created Mineo's crevice garden, he planted several dwarf mugho pines (Pinus mugo mugo).’
    • ‘Unlike the pine tree, which stood erect and broke before the storm, the willow yielded to the weight of snow on its branches, but did not break under it.’
    • ‘This was the most attractive man she'd ever seen in her life, and she just met him under a pine tree seeking shelter from a torrential downpour.’
    • ‘I even discovered a large pine tree from a neighborhood behind the car shop; it seemed like the new place where all the birds had gone.’
    • ‘The next morning found Saoirse, sitting under a pine tree with a pile of potatoes and a rough knife in her hand.’
    • ‘The result was very helpful, but I wasted three hours climbing around in a pine tree trying to retrieve the damned parachute.’
    • ‘He used his strength against mine and pulled me successfully through the window and into the tall pine tree beside Josie's window.’
    • ‘Together, they took a seat under the dry cover of a pine tree.’
    • ‘He strung it up by its ankles from the branch of a pine tree, placed a five gallon pickle bucket under its snout, and deftly sliced open its jugular veins.’
    • ‘He apparently struck a pine tree on the edge of a wheat field before crashing into the field at a steep angle, LaRoche said.’
    • ‘Its araucaria pines, villages dotted with conical-roofed ‘fare’ ceremonial houses and balmy waters are the stuff of postcards.’
    • ‘The money will be used to plant Korean pine, a native species that produces nuts eaten by tiger prey in the forests of the Russian Far East.’
    • ‘In Wang's paper cutting works, one can find the style of traditional Chinese painting, such as the hill in the distance and a pine tree standing beside the a river.’
    • ‘Holly leaned back on a pine tree, and thought about their problem.’
    • ‘Keeping incredibly low, we wiggled our way through the trees, passing just below the drooping branches of a large pine tree.’
    • ‘Jade put her hand over her eyes to shield them from the sun and saw, true to Lanyon's word, that there was a large castle sitting on a hill past a large pine tree.’
    • ‘Viewing the figure of a tall pine tree standing at the peak of Huangshan Mountain near the scenic spot of Meng Bi Sheng Hua, who would suspect that it was plastic?’
    • ‘Hollyhock landed in a low branch of a pine tree, and dangled there as she tried to find a way to get down.’
    • ‘While we don't find fossils of the Wollemi pine tree and humans together, we do know they live together - because both are alive today.’
    1. 1.1Used in names of coniferous trees of families other than that of the pine, e.g. Chile pine.
    2. 1.2Used in names of unrelated plants that resemble the pines in some way, e.g. ground pine, screw pine.
    3. 1.3[as modifier]Having the scent of pine needles.
      ‘pine potpourri’
      • ‘This energetic, sensual and woody fragrance contains a dash of tangerine and pine scents.’
      • ‘The air smelled of sun-roasted pine needles and wild strawberries.’
      • ‘The floor was wet, stained, and pine needles were littered around the spot he had stood on.’
      • ‘With Christmas on its way, the scent of pine needles from garlands and evergreen trees, as well as the spices and gingerbread of the bakeries, filled Jude's nostrils.’
      • ‘Inside the dark, pillared wood, precious little light seeps, there's only the noise of wood and the crunch of pine needles underfoot.’
      • ‘By contrast to needles, pine roots contained relatively low concentrations of soluble antioxidants.’
      • ‘In the bathhouse, there are several different types of tubs, such as the bamboo leaf tub, bamboo extract tub and pine needle tub.’
      • ‘Not only will it remove the stain - it's going to have a great fresh, pine scent too!’
      • ‘For the most part this area is decomposed granite laced with leaves and pine needles.’
      • ‘She nearly choked as the overwhelming scent of pine needles hit her.’
      • ‘Sit in the sun with a loaf of fresh bread, a hunk of cheese and some German sausage and soak up the medieval atmosphere and scent of flowers and pine resin.’
      • ‘She could hear the dry leaves and pine needles crushing beneath the stallion's hooves.’
      • ‘I closed my eyes momentarily, allowing her scent of baking bread and fresh pine needles to carry me to a time and place long departed.’
      • ‘The aroma of pine needles hangs in the air, mixed with the sweet smell of gingerbread baking in the oven.’
      • ‘But he said the edge of the carriageway was ‘ill-defined’, with pine needles and other debris deposited there.’
      • ‘A cold, crisp scent, mixed with the spice of pine needles, cut the air.’
      • ‘The pair split up, Det Supt Higgins heading into Brandsby wood across the spongy forest floor strewn with pine needles and fallen branches.’
      • ‘Perhaps it was a faint scent of pine needles that hung in the air, perhaps it was the clarity with which she viewed the scenes played out before her.’
      • ‘The scent of pine cleanser greeted us as we walked in.’
      • ‘I pulled my boyfriend away, pressing my face into his beautiful black hair, breathing in the heady scent of pine needles.’
  • 2West Indian informal A pineapple.

Origin

Old English, from Latin pinus, reinforced in Middle English by Old French pin.

Pronunciation:

pine

/pʌɪn/

Main definitions of pine in English

: pine1pine2

pine2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Suffer a mental and physical decline, especially because of a broken heart.

    ‘she thinks I am pining away from love’
    • ‘Over in Emmerdale,, poor old Alan Turner has been pining over lost love, Shelly.’
    • ‘She made it quite clear that she had no interest in me, and I would spend long periods of time pining over her - and rather enjoying the unrequited sense of melancholy this provided.’
    • ‘What Might Have Been is a melancholy sojourn through pining over possibilities.’
    • ‘Norquist is apparently pining away for the day when America has the same tax system as economic powerhouses like Russia, the Ukraine, and Iraq.’
    • ‘Think of the beauty of this: I get home after a long day at work, open my mailbox and find the new release I've been pining to watch!’
    • ‘Now that I was out and about, I was feeling a little stronger and wasn't about to spend the rest of the night pining after some guy.’
    • ‘Jason has been pining after this girl since high school!’
    • ‘A woman pining away for her love, lost at sea, for over 30 years.’
    • ‘His friends would say stop pining, there's others girls to look at.’
    • ‘All the time he was talking, I was staring at the equipment laid out in front of us and inwardly pining to be set free on it all afternoon.’
    • ‘He was actually worrying and pining in his heart, but he could not say anything.’
    • ‘The two were lovers who slept in the same bed, until one of them died and the other pined away to join him in death.’
    • ‘Combined Schools would perhaps spend that day pining over a match they seemed to have had in the basket!’
    • ‘Surely the Phantom suffered through worse all those hours pining after that lovely chorus girl.’
    • ‘She was still pining over Tom, but felt that she had to carry on.’
    • ‘It bleats like a child at its father's wake, relentlessly pining to crescendo before it collapses, exhausted, in its mother's arms.’
    • ‘They have been a partnership for more than 30 years but Salt the tortoise is pining without her buddy Pepper.’
    • ‘I had rejections, a string of unrequited loves that I laid awake at night uselessly pining over, and once I even got caught in a bear trap.’
    • ‘Best friend or not, he had let his chance with Krystal pass time and time again, pining away for Jess, a woman he could not have.’
    • ‘Not just in a figure of speech kind of way, but genuinely in love - jittery in its presence, pining during its absence, utterly fulfilled and completed during the time you spend with it?’
    yearn, long, ache, sigh, hunger, thirst, itch, languish, carry a torch
    languish, decline, go into a decline, lose strength, weaken, waste away, dwindle, wilt, wither, fade, flag, sicken, droop, brood, mope, moon
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Miss or long for.
      ‘she's still pining for him’
      • ‘But for American Scots pining for a taste of the old country, there's nothing like a haggis from Scotland and that's where the smugglers come in.’
      • ‘A future monarchy cannot rest on an individual pining for the past.’
      • ‘Once this happens, our bodies will no longer crave toxins and my pining for chicken popcorn will fade.’
      • ‘Edie Falco plays Marly, a hard-drinking late-thirtysomething woman, working at her dad's motel and diner, hassled by her good-for-nothing ex-husband and pining for a way out of there.’
      • ‘He's feeling crook, pining for his bed, but the game face stays on.’
      • ‘He had never seen signs of an adult sheep pining for another.’
      • ‘The first semester was okay, but after Christmas I started to pine for home, wishing I was closer, that I could just be there.’
      • ‘I'd been pining for an early night since Tuesday.’
      • ‘He also wryly acknowledges that he risks sounding like a grumpy old man pining for an overly-romanticised past.’
      • ‘Some might call it modern art, but I'll be pining for my classic landscape.’
      • ‘She is being helped by Stacey, an American of indeterminate function, who is pining for Starbucks.’
      • ‘Those of us pining for the sensuality of the tropical island often forget that paradise is, at root, a religious notion.’
      • ‘From the heat and frenzy of my city kitchen, I'm pining for the woods, and will have to snatch some time out to fill a basket or two of wild harvest.’
      • ‘Anyway, to stop me pining for my family, Reginald suggested we join a group protesting against a proposed massive wind-turbine development.’
      • ‘No one spending long hours at work, pining for their baby is happy, but neither is a mother bored and depressed at home who longs to get back to her job.’
      • ‘His children, who are pining for their father, are being cared for by relatives and told that their father is away working hard to raise case to take them to Disneyland Paris.’
      • ‘A marmoset monkey was pining for his lost brother last night after thieves snatched him in a daylight heist.’
      • ‘Anything to keep oneself entertained on those long, lonely evenings when pining for unavailable men.’
      • ‘There are plenty of little people scattered about the corners of Ruisdael's vistas, but they are never Diana chasing Actaeon, or Echo pining for Narcissus, as they usually are in 17th-century landscapes.’
      • ‘A tragic metaphor for unrequited homosexual desire, she pines for him, but, dismayed at his ‘arrogance,’ refuses to admit it.’

Origin

Old English pīnian ‘(cause to) suffer’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch pijnen, German peinen experience pain, also to obsolete pine ‘punishment’; ultimately based on Latin poena punishment.

Pronunciation:

pine

/pʌɪn/