Definition of pin-up in English:

pin-up

noun

  • 1A poster showing a famous or attractive person.

    • ‘Who was your bedroom wall poster pin-up: David Cassidy?’
    • ‘And be still my beating heart, a stunning collection of old pin-ups, magazines and paperbacks for sale on e-bay.’
    • ‘Cover images were pin-ups for the people, available on newsstands everywhere.’
    • ‘The walls are filled with pin-up posters of Abba, the Bee Gees, and Shaun Cassidy.’
    • ‘Is it just us, or does all this retro culture stuff seem infused with an element of cheesecake, a world where the pin-up was the height of visual elegance?’
    • ‘You could stick it next to your pin-up of Hendrik Verwoerd, another old white man who thought his Bible held some useful tips on how to manage human affairs.’
    • ‘Before you know it, Petey is a panderer of pulchritude, a producer of pin-ups featuring barely dressed babes.’
    • ‘By reuniting the oft-reproduced images of Che Guevara and the Baader-Meinhof pin-ups with their tenets of belief, LaBruce puts the radical back into radical chic.’
    • ‘I also want to thank the editors of The Nation for their playfulness and/or insensitivity in allowing my perky pin-up to get into print.’
    • ‘Adam was checking out a calendar with pin-ups of models when he saw me clutching all the posters of him, ‘Whoa, I never knew you were so into me.’’
    • ‘The owner of each disc will receive a special prize and a signed pin-up!’
    • ‘Football's original pin-up was described by university registrar James O'Kane as ‘noteworthy, sometimes notorious, but never ignored’.’
    • ‘Women soldiers will also have to take down their favorite pin-ups, as one clause, expressly formulated to include both men and women, prohibits them from hanging up pornographic images that might offend others.’
    • ‘Amongst a second set of Glastonbury posters is a pin-up of Michael and Emily Eavis.’
    • ‘And a testosterone-driven culture was further fed by the pin-up, culminating in the Page 3 Girl.’
    • ‘Jacksonville Shipyard established that nude pin-ups in a locker - apart from any other consideration - constituted sexual harassment, even if the complainant was not targeted.’
    • ‘Scorsese reinforces the point by juxtaposing images of his own mother preparing food for prim and well-behaved children with the nudie pin-ups that adorn the walls at the hang-out of J.R. and his pals.’
    • ‘I pondered what it would feel like, going to one of my mates houses and having him show me the latest pin-up in his garage, only to find that it would be her.’
    • ‘They are purely concerned with selling their creativity and observing how the world respond to it whereas boybands are more concerned with capitalising on memorabilia sold and being the pin-ups in every girl's room.’
    • ‘One of the ‘girls’ in the office has a pin-up of Robert Montgomery on the wall.’
    1. 1.1 A person featured in a pin-up.
      • ‘To the untrained eye, everyone appears more or less the same, the men going for a more authentic take on Mark Lamarr's look, the women modelling themselves on Fifties pin-ups.’
      • ‘A second print run may have to be considered as some of the club's strikers and defenders are becoming pin-ups.’
      • ‘A tattoo artist at Tattoomania for two years now, she emblazons said objects with imagery heavily inspired by her trade and by old pin-ups.’
      • ‘But the all-star event - originally due to feature top acts like X Factor pin-ups G4 and Welsh songbird Katherine Jenkins on June 15-could still wow music fans later this summer.’
      • ‘Making a sharp exit, Urquhart found solace in modelling and an unlikely role as pin-up for girls' teen mag My Guy.’
      • ‘The Daily Mirror strip finished in 1959 and things went quiet for Jane until the 1970s when Lesley Duff portrayed the pin-up in the musical stage-play Happy As A Sandbag.’
      • ‘In related news, British Navy has rescinded their recent ban on the skin on the ships; British sailors will be again able to hang ‘in the privacy of their own quarters’ their favorite pin-ups.’
      • ‘Porter, the former pin-up from Portobello - most famous for having her naked body projected on to the Houses of Parliament - is in high spirits.’
      • ‘Some pin-ups will be present to sign calendars.’
      • ‘In media that portray women largely as victims or pin-ups, we desperately need stories of ordinary Bangladeshi women who have beaten the odds.’
      • ‘Two of those legendary calendars, featuring the world's most glamorous pin-ups, currently have pride of place at Eastleigh Museum.’
      • ‘Johansson is peeling off her clothes in a photographic studio in LA, in preparation for becoming the pin-up for Bono's new plan.’
      • ‘McCoist is an icon, a pin-up, a hero, a joker, an enthusiast, but he will still be all of that tomorrow.’
      • ‘By the turn of the century the pin-up was no longer a girl-next-doorish glamour model but that useful catch-all, a ‘celebrity’.’
      • ‘They're all the same height, they all dress the same, young girls fawn over them like pin-ups, but Turn are not a boy band.’
      • ‘A Kerry man, who became a calendar pin-up at the age of 90, has passed away.’
      • ‘There is a bold emphasis on image building and promoting the idea of the pin-up.’
      • ‘The blond pin-up said he had three amazing years with Busted but was devoted to Fightstar.’
      • ‘Another idea, to raise funds for three military charities, was a calendar fronted by Page 3 model and Forces pin-up Nell McAndrew and including Mrs Webster's son Nicky Coward.’
      • ‘We all can't be pin-ups like Tom Cruise or Nicole Kidman, or rock stars like Bono or Sinead O'Connor, or gifted writers like Edna O'Brien or Norman Mailer.’
      beauty, beautiful woman, dream, vision, picture, goddess, venus, siren, charmer, enchantress, seductress
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Pronunciation

pin-up

/ˈpɪnʌp/