Definition of pigskin in English:

pigskin

noun

  • 1The hide of a domestic pig.

    • ‘We have demonstrated that SUP becomes bioavailable in viable pigskin epidermis when applied topically.’
    • ‘This Saturday you can avoid hundreds of unnecessary calories by skipping the pigskin (literally and figuratively) and saying yes to fitness.’
    • ‘In olden-day Africa, getting the message was a matter of listening carefully for the rhythms of pounding pigskin.’
    • ‘Indeed, the ancient purity laws of Leviticus in the Old Testament prohibit the activities of ingesting shellfish or touching a dead pigskin.’
    • ‘The burn wound can be excised and covered with temporary or permanent closures such as pigskin or human cadaver skin.’
    • ‘After irradiation, the stratum corneum was removed from the pigskin by stripping with adhesive tape.’
    • ‘To believe that there is something wrong with sewing pagans in pigskin is to deny one's faith.’
    • ‘We have to find them, kill them, wrap them in a pigskin and bury them.’
    • ‘It was demonstrated with small pieces of pigskin and inorganic materials but might eventually prove useful for imaging living tissues to help diagnose or determine the extent of various types of skin cancers.’
    • ‘Triplicate analyses were performed for each experiment, and each experiment was repeated three times using different batches of pigskin.’
    • ‘I started with a crackling salad: cold pigskin with slices of grainy dry apple and some suppository radishes.’
    • ‘Other local goods to which discounts can be applied: leather, silver, pigskin, cosmetics, liquor and perfumes, most of which are already sold at everyday low prices when compared to U.S. rates.’
    • ‘Moslem clerics have responded with mockery to the myth that putting pigskin on the bodies of Muslim terrorists prevents them from entering paradise.’
    • ‘Under the rowers' seats were large pigskin bladders, connected by pipes to the outside.’
    • ‘Wine was frequently stored in cueros, pigskins lined with pitch or resin which tainted the wine.’
    • ‘They use pigskin taken from slaughtered animals.’
    • ‘All the men lost weight on a diet of meager amounts of bread with rancid butter and turnip soup that often featured chunks of pigskin - with hair still attached - or a pig's eye.’
    1. 1.1mass noun Leather made from pigskin.
      as modifier ‘a pair of black pigskin gloves’
      • ‘Since touching the skin of a dead pig makes one ‘unclean,’ no one can wear gloves made of pigskin.’
      • ‘It can be made from a variety of pelts and hides including leather, sealskin, mink, racoon, rabbit or pigskin in hundreds of different styles.’
      • ‘It's that I have come to resemble a huge, distended pigskin sack that has been stuffed to bursting point with offal and custard by greedy giants.’
      • ‘I had also a pigskin bag, old and creased but sturdy, and still showing the mark of painted designs of spirals upon it, which had been my father's.’
      • ‘Her document was trifolded to fit into a thin pigskin leather envelope.’
      • ‘Anmar took out his last little swatch of pigskin leather from the bag at his feet.’
      • ‘Instead of the traditional brown pigskin with white laces, the XFL and Spalding created a two-tone football, with a red X on a black background.’
      • ‘Sit back on the pigskin seats with a glass of Pig's Nose whisky and a bowl of Pork Scratchings watching Babe for the tenth time.’
      • ‘This is a superb rig consisting of a tapered belt, holster and double cartridge case all of oiled single weight leather except for the Mexican loop style holster, which is lined with pigskin.’
      • ‘Off she roared in her pigskin jacket and her kid gloves, mindlessly crushing living creatures beneath the Harley's wheels.’
      • ‘They put down their loads and went back for more, and Burginde brought in one hand my pigskin satchel, and in the other the willow cage that held the linnet.’
  • 2North American informal A football.

    • ‘Well before the first official football game in 1887, Penn State students were more likely to be found playing cricket than tossing the pigskin around.’
    • ‘He had no desire to run a pigskin down a field and risk being jumped on top of doing so.’
    • ‘In the late 1970s when I crouched under center, I turned around and placed that pigskin in the very capable hands of Billy Sims.’
    • ‘Early in his career, which began in 1995 with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Holcomb seemed more comfortable with a clipboard in his hands than a pigskin.’
    • ‘When in doubt, forwards, don't just boot the pigskin into the air, look to another TEAM member and pass the ball.’
    • ‘He chased after that bouncing pigskin while I crossed my arms and shivered.’
    • ‘He even went so far as to suggest that we go out and ‘throw the pigskin around,’ as he so nicely put it.’
    • ‘I'm supposed to play football tomorrow, because unlike baseball, the weather is not a factor with the pigskin, or else, Wisconsin wouldn't be a sea of green and yellow.’
    • ‘But with the football season winding to a close, fantasy owners' minds have started turning from the gridiron to the diamond, from the pigskin to the horsehide.’
    • ‘His main competition at training camp has been there the whole time, sweating it out with his teammates, and throwing the pigskin pretty well, one might add.’
    • ‘The only animals I've been interacting with lately are behemoths who tackle each other over pigskin.’
    • ‘The second reflex, should you be fortunate enough to get your hands on the pigskin, is trying to put it away as quickly as possible.’
    • ‘During her free time, you can often find Rhi tossing the pigskin.’
    • ‘There's room on the Thanksgiving-week sports buffet for more than just pigskin.’
    • ‘As you chuck it to one of your receivers or are playing defense on the thrown ball, the pigskin almost seems to disappear for a split second.’
    • ‘Imagine playing a game of pickup pigskin and getting to choose your players from the rosters of real NFL teams.’
    • ‘But while you're tossing the pigskin around, maybe you should explain to a son that the measure of a man is more than the ability to summon or endure violence.’
    • ‘He grunts in ecstasy as his foot makes contact with the pigskin.’
    • ‘He may impede more than he helps, but we know his heart is noble because, with sonar helmets and a beeping pigskin, he is trying to teach blind people to play football, though nobody yet has caught a pass.’
    • ‘When a game of footy is compared, in serious terms, it begs the question, what is valued more, life or kicking the pigskin around?’

Pronunciation

pigskin

/ˈpɪɡskɪn/