Definition of piggy (also pig) in the middle in English:

piggy (also pig) in the middle

phrase

British
  • 1A game in which two people attempt to throw a ball to each other without a third person in the middle catching it.

    • ‘She said: ‘One day we brought a football and played soccer, ball games and piggy in the middle with the children.’’
    • ‘I mostly play games with the children like rounders and piggy in the middle.’
    • ‘We spend many evening hours playing piggy-in-the-middle with them.’
    • ‘After playing piggy-in-the-middle with the children, we have breakfast at about 7.30am.’
    • ‘Pegasus and I were playing piggy in the middle with Faith, she was in the middle.’
    1. 1.1 A person who is placed in an awkward situation between two others.
      ‘I don't want to be piggy in the middle between Guido and Silvia’
      • ‘We are very much piggy in the middle as we have to go along with what the council decides, but we don't believe bikers' lives will be risked by the in-fill.’
      • ‘And as ever, the UN is playing piggy in the middle.’
      • ‘When you become a stepparent, you find yourself not just playing Piggy in the Middle between your partner and his/her children, but often between your partner and his/her ex, your partner and your ex, your partner and your children, your children and your partner's children.’
      • ‘I am piggy in the middle at this point in time, passing diluted and sanitised versions of opinions over the phone between husband up to his eye balls at work, and plumber up a step ladder.’
      • ‘He said: 'I have always been playing piggy-in-the-middle between the computer-science people and the applications people.’
      • ‘It gets me so cross because they are like piggy in the middle, and can't do right for doing wrong.’
      • ‘I just wish they could send the public on a course to tell them that receptionists are human too, and are normally playing piggy in the middle between the boss and the public.’
      • ‘Sterling has been piggy in the middle between the dollar and the euro.’