Definition of pietism in English:

pietism

noun

  • 1[mass noun] Pious sentiment, especially of an exaggerated or affected nature.

    • ‘As in many things, we must walk that line between legalism or pietism on the one hand and licentiousness on the other.’
    • ‘Paul, in a manner certainly inconsistent with the anti-intellectual pietism of our day, places the emphasis on our thinking.’
    • ‘Rather than appealing to reason, pietism emphasized the strong emotional power of personal religious experience.’
    • ‘These doctrines become more tempting as forms of retreatism in postmodernity, in the face of increasing ethnic, religious, and sexual pluralism, functioning as a new reification of subjectivity, a new pietism of self.’
    • ‘Both built pietism into their systems, believing that society must be converted before the state could be conquered.’
    sanctimoniousness, sanctimony, pietism, piousness, affected piety, affected superiority, false virtue, cant, humbug, pretence, posturing, speciousness, empty talk
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A 17th-century movement for the revival of piety in the Lutheran Church.
      • ‘Rationalism and pietism were two viewpoints that reduced religious controversy during the 1700's.’
      • ‘I must be open about the fact that I am relying heavily here on motifs that loom large in my own tradition of Calvinist pietism.’
      • ‘The experiential pietism of the Great Awakening's revival preachers influenced prorevival Puritans to require testimony to an inner experience of personal encounter with God as a normative sign of conversion.’
      • ‘During the half-century after J. S. Bach's death in 1750, musical standards in Lutheranism declined rapidly in the face of triumphant Enlightenment rationalism and pietism.’
      • ‘In Halle, birthplace of George Frederick Handel and once a center of Lutheran pietism that preached the personal devotion to the Redeemer, only 10 percent of the inhabitants belong to a Christian denomination.’

Origin

Late 17th century: from German Pietismus, from modern Latin, based on Latin pietas (see piety).

Pronunciation:

pietism

/ˈpʌɪətɪz(ə)m/