Definition of phraseology in English:

phraseology

noun

  • A particular mode of expression, especially one characteristic of a particular speaker or subject area:

    ‘legal phraseology’
    • ‘So I was strict, marking the Custer manuscript heavily, lacing into its phraseology, conception, and organization.’
    • ‘Even in social circles there are serious attempts to change some words and phraseologies to remove the connotations that these terminologies have acquired over a long time.’
    • ‘This phraseology cannot be very assuring to the Karzai government.’
    • ‘But most readers can probably recognize the cloying phraseology as self-serving.’
    • ‘My phraseology was perhaps too colloquial and informal - I was trying to pay them a compliment for getting the story.’
    • ‘There is no science of cookery possible without a correct phraseology.’
    • ‘On the air since January 2, it is, to use the cliched phraseology, a television show with a difference in the sense that it has Ruby playing a double role in all the episodes.’
    • ‘We know that he valued Kierkegaard and Schopenhauer, and one of the most wonderful of his later poems raids Coleridge for its closing phraseology.’
    • ‘‘The phraseology used in the past is not going to disappear because of the new guidelines,’ he said.’
    • ‘This phraseology, Lakoff argues, implies first that tax is a burden or a virulent disease which cries out for a cure.’
    • ‘So spare me your showy concern for sensitivity by using the appropriate phraseology.’
    • ‘Though the phraseology is a bit confusing, the technique is relatively simple.’
    • ‘Sure enough, he is attempting to ‘keep a lid on things’ - part of his staple phraseology.’
    • ‘This phraseology is open to numerous interpretations, and hopefully the yet-to-be published regulations will provide assistance to employers.’
    • ‘More often, Carson employs a sort of linguistic camp: a phraseology that is obviously exaggerated or out of place, but which is meant to be relished for that very reason.’
    • ‘The phraseology might have been a bit offside, though.’
    • ‘I know that my phraseology and way of putting things is sometimes a bit direct.’
    • ‘Such phraseology is needed if one wants to name things without calling up mental pictures of them.’
    • ‘Note the cautious phraseology, which implies that these could have nothing more than a placebo effect: if you think a treatment is doing you good, then you may well perk up a bit anyway.’
    • ‘Hardy's rhetoric allows the critic to overlook the simple wrongness of Tess's act, and mask it in a neutral phraseology more appropriate to suicide or death by natural causes than homicide.’
    wording, choice of words, phrasing, usage, idiom, diction, parlance, words, language, vocabulary, terminology
    jargon, patter, cant, -speak, dialect, vernacular, argot, patois, style, way of speaking, way of writing, manner of speaking, manner of writing, style of speech, style of writing, mode of speech, mode of writing
    façon de parler
    lingo
    idiolect
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 17th century: from modern Latin phraseologia, from Greek phraseōn, genitive plural of phrasis a phrase + -logia (see -logy).

Pronunciation

phraseology

/ˌfreɪzɪˈɒlədʒi/