Definition of philological in English:

philological

adjective

  • See philology

    • ‘The Berlin anthropologist Bastian argued that Humboldt's ‘comparative method’ allowed natural science to surpass historical and philological criticism as a tool for interpreting human culture.’
    • ‘His philological pursuits, interest in Indian legal literature (rare among Europeans of his time), and his liberal political outlook, introduced him to Indian languages, including SANSKRIT.’
    • ‘Both in his translation and in his other exegetical work, he employed philological techniques unusual for Jewish scholars: he attempted to derive the literal meaning of the texts from the semantics of the individual words.’
    • ‘As he unravels the origins of Tolkien's work, Shippey goes into great philological detail about the origins of words.’
    • ‘Using his humanist skills in rhetoric, philosophy, and philology, he demonstrated that its historical anachronisms, philological errors, and contradictions in logic revealed that the Donation was an 8th-century forgery.’

Pronunciation

philological

/fɪləˈlɒdʒɪk(ə)l/