Definition of persuasion in English:

persuasion

noun

  • 1mass noun The action or process of persuading someone or of being persuaded to do or believe something.

    ‘Monica needed plenty of persuasion before she actually left’
    • ‘Why was there no adequate process of persuasion?’
    • ‘Instead of cracking down hard, the municipality took a soft approach, a combination of gentle persuasion and public shaming.’
    • ‘Some urged caution, apparently believing that this government is open to persuasion.’
    • ‘Any arm-twisting or gentle persuasion presumably took place in corridor huddles or late-night conversations.’
    • ‘I was open to persuasion that the actual facts before the court did not disclose a case of negligence that had any reasonable prospect of success.’
    • ‘It is a process of persuasion designed to induce ideas, opinions, or actions beneficial to the source.’
    • ‘Furthermore, only through persuasion and argument were people to influence others to join their religion.’
    • ‘All I am doing is providing an opening for persuasion and argument!’
    • ‘We don't need to use persuasion to make people believe that fire burns.’
    • ‘If this means that the professor is open to persuasion, I certainly hope to persuade him.’
    • ‘There is little doubt that the Londoners will wish to retain his services, but he remains open to persuasion.’
    • ‘We have tried persuasion and argument, but nobody is listening.’
    • ‘From gentle persuasion to threats and abuse, coercion was apart of the courtship process.’
    • ‘Admittedly, it did take a bit of persuasion to get government accountants to accept that idea.’
    • ‘Invite discussion, and be open to correction and persuasion.’
    • ‘If this fails then gentle persuasion should follow.’
    • ‘Speaking for myself, I remain open to persuasion, should the honours committee look my way.’
    • ‘But it is both naive and dangerous to imagine that gentle persuasion can change their core activities.’
    • ‘However, both argument and rhetoric have persuasion in common.’
    • ‘They pay special attention to the way social responsibilities are fostered by informal communal processes of persuasion and peer pressure.’
    coaxing, persuading, coercion, inducement, convincing, blandishment, encouragement, urging, prompting, inveiglement, temptation, cajolery, enticement, wheedling, pressure, moral pressure
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  • 2A belief or set of beliefs, especially religious or political ones.

    ‘writers of all political persuasions’
    • ‘Whatever your religious persuasions may be, I think this just about sums it up, don't you?’
    • ‘Read books, newspapers, and online content from both political persuasions to be certain you fully understand the issues at hand.’
    • ‘I can't imagine anyone, of any political or religious persuasion, who would not be offended.’
    • ‘For example, nursing schools at Catholic hospitals once played a central role in training nurses from many religious persuasions.’
    • ‘I hope that other colleagues of all political persuasions will join me.’
    • ‘Friends of mine are displaying the peace flags no matter what their religious inclinations or political persuasions.’
    • ‘This does not discount that we can do good no matter what religious persuasion we are or even if one is an atheist.’
    • ‘Even their political persuasions are not as predictable as you might expect.’
    • ‘They're fun, they're violent, and they have a moralistic narrative frame that makes them palatable to most political persuasions.’
    • ‘Throughout his life, he gained and retained the friendship and respect of men of the most diverse political and religious persuasions.’
    • ‘We started our campaign by saying that starvation, regardless of political or religious persuasion, is at its core a moral issue that concerns us all.’
    • ‘Some Republicans, as well as Democrats, and religious groups of both liberal and conservative persuasions have raised concerns.’
    • ‘We did not mix with schools of other religions, and were not encouraged to make friends with anyone not of our religious persuasion.’
    • ‘The two women may share a political persuasion but insiders say their styles of leadership are very different.’
    • ‘I've worked for ministers of very different political persuasions.’
    • ‘People of all ages, backgrounds and political persuasions joined together in unison.’
    • ‘Whatever sexual, ethical, religious and political persuasions a person comes from, it can only be good to give all people a great welcome to Scotland.’
    • ‘We hope people of all political persuasions will come and see the show.’
    • ‘Political leaders and women of all political persuasions are expected to attend the commemorations.’
    • ‘They have the same rights no matter what their political persuasions are.’
    belief, opinion, conviction, faith, certainty, certitude, view
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    1. 2.1 A group or sect holding a particular religious belief.
      ‘the village had two chapels for those of the Primitive Methodist persuasion’
      • ‘Israeli Jews will then have emancipated themselves at last, becoming citizens of Israel - of the Mosaic persuasion.’
      • ‘I am in the midst of a theological dilemma which, given my atheist persuasion, feels rather uncomfortable.’
      • ‘The temple is the most sacred site in Nepal, widely venerated by members of at least four major sectarian Buddhist persuasions, each with distinct ethnic and caste affiliations.’
      group, grouping, sect, denomination, party, camp, side, faction, religion, cult, affiliation, school of thought, belief, creed, credo, faith, philosophy
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    2. 2.2humorous Sort, kind, or nature.
      ‘half a dozen gents of British persuasion’
      • ‘Many people of a bohemian persuasion passed through her living room, from artists to drug addicts, not that those classifications were mutually exclusive.’
      • ‘Taken together, adherents of these two scholarly persuasions constituted a powerful, ideologically driven interest group.’
      • ‘In fact, over the years, trade unionists of different persuasions have criticised the Labour Court for reaching verdicts they believed too favourable to employers.’
      • ‘Pictured on the poster was a collared clergyperson of the female persuasion.’
      character, nature, essence, quality, disposition, make-up, calibre
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Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin persuasio(n-), from the verb persuadere (see persuade).

Pronunciation

persuasion

/pəˈsweɪʒ(ə)n/