Definition of permanence in English:

permanence

noun

mass noun
  • The state or quality of lasting or remaining unchanged indefinitely.

    ‘the clarity and permanence of the dyes’
    • ‘The long term permanence of the change is perhaps more interesting.’
    • ‘An entryway of brick steps adds warmth and character and helps to project a sense of quality and permanence.’
    • ‘For all the apparent permanence, within a protracted, geological time-scale, sandstone is in fact quite quick to change.’
    • ‘This is a place where traditions run deep, and where the long shadow of Ben Nevis seems to add a sense of permanence to the town.’
    • ‘Security, stability and permanence would be best achieved through adoption.’
    • ‘Such a sense of permanence, of an unbroken link to the past, is one of the lures of islands.’
    • ‘The singing and laughing is louder than ever, as if the volume of our voices has a way of creating permanence.’
    • ‘Their greatness can perhaps be best measured in terms of their permanence.’
    • ‘There was a sense of permanence in my mind, and as the morning spread out I was aware of the opportunity for making a new start.’
    • ‘It's fun to work on something that has some permanence, something that could outlast me.’
    • ‘The exceptional audio and video quality and the permanence of the medium are things we really like.’
    • ‘This gave her strength and a feeling of permanence, continuity and contentment with her home.’
    • ‘Yet vast reserves of potential support awaited any regime that could achieve that stability, and that permanence.’
    • ‘A great path not only offers access, it helps form the garden's structural backbone and creates a feeling of permanence.’
    • ‘Such permanence makes local journalists more aware of the power of print.’
    • ‘Other Italians admired the quality of permanence which printing gave to literature in general.’
    • ‘Stone steps, stairways, benches and gate posts can all add a feeling of permanence to a garden.’
    • ‘The feelings of solidity and permanence are illusory, for nothing is truly solid and permanent in this life.’
    • ‘All of this is characterized by redundant aspects of stability, permanence and continuity.’
    • ‘In the psyche of the second and third generation Tibetans, there is no real sense of permanence.’
    stability, durability, persistence, permanency, fixity, fixedness, changelessness, immutability, endurance, dependability, constancy, continuance, continuity, immortality, indestructibility, perpetuity, endlessness
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from medieval Latin permanentia (perhaps via French), from permanent- ‘remaining to the end’, from the verb permanere.

Pronunciation

permanence

/ˈpəːmənəns/