Definition of peevish in English:

peevish

adjective

  • Having or showing an irritable disposition.

    ‘a thin peevish voice’
    • ‘He resists with buffoonery on the set, peevish demands for attention, and displays of contempt for her direction.’
    • ‘Students are showing no sign of being as bitchy and peevish as I was yet.’
    • ‘We are more used to his peevish criticism of Tory successes.’
    • ‘But the board added a peevish note to the effect that it was a shame the law allowed no prohibition of what it called ‘hate speech’.’
    • ‘His posture was impatient, peevish and annoyed that he had to answer to anyone.’
    • ‘Spring comes soon, and the eldest son suddenly turns moody and peevish, unwilling to eat or go to school.’
    • ‘He grinned at her, sharing their triumph, though he knew that in a few days she would become peevish and seek another argument.’
    • ‘The boys tended to make the men peevish and sarcastic, the girls made Emma brittle and shrewish.’
    • ‘A spotty youth with greasy black hair, he was sitting at the table with a peevish expression on his weaselly face.’
    • ‘As for his peevish, snide remarks about the press, he may think them, but he really has to keep them to himself.’
    • ‘There he catered to couples, snazzy middle-aged divorced female cliques and peevish teenagers.’
    • ‘As the authors have produced such a splendid book it seems peevish to point out deficiencies.’
    • ‘Boswell, peevish after spending a night in a haybarn, complained of the lack of marble monuments.’
    • ‘He has been severely criticized as peevish, neurotic, rising only to mediocrity, but it was not an easy war to win.’
    • ‘It featured a peevish hipster, complaining about how his grasp of cool was slipping.’
    • ‘Seeing him whiny and peevish in the first debate was a huge anti-climax.’
    • ‘At least I broke nothing and burned no one, although I did make mild-mannered old Jason downright peevish from all the messy sink water I splashed onto him.’
    • ‘The stress of her endless demands on Sidney Herbert accompanied by peevish outbursts, surely contributed to his own death at the early age of 51 in 1861.’
    • ‘Harder to stomach is the peevish, chip-on-your-shoulder feminism that pervades so much of the book.’
    • ‘I was kind of feeling peevish, and I wasn't too happy about that feeling.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘perverse, coy’): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

peevish

/ˈpiːvɪʃ/