Definition of peeve in English:

peeve

verb

[with object]usually as adjective peeved
informal
  • Make (someone) rather annoyed; irritate.

    ‘he was peeved at being excluded from the meeting’
    ‘that was the one thing that peeved him’
    • ‘U.S. and European drugs and pharmaceutical companies are reported to be peeved at this.’
    • ‘I sat down to watch it and was somewhat peeved to see that they hadn't included anything about the alternate ending.’
    • ‘They're peeved because a rich American businessman with no knowledge of football has taken over the club.’
    • ‘I was peeved because I'd come back for my morning tea break and was waiting for a gap between showers to get out under a nice dry awning or archway.’
    • ‘He wore a slightly peeved expression, a dissected newspaper strewn about his side of the table.’
    • ‘The insurance companies are particularly peeved at the absence of the risk management concept in the revised tariff.’
    • ‘The Tories were rather peeved, and the Liberal Democrats not very impressed.’
    • ‘He was still peeved at Roger's actions, but would forgive him if everything turned out well in the end.’
    • ‘While I am seriously peeved over what happened, I can't help but feel sorry for people like him.’
    • ‘I couldn't quite make out whether the doc was peeved because I was back again or genuinely surprised to see me again so soon.’
    • ‘However, I am slightly peeved at myself as I should've done some of these application forms on Monday.’
    • ‘This peeved me because I was few months older than him, though in those days you lied about your age.’
    • ‘She's peeved, and you're left wondering if she's having a brain lapse or something.’
    • ‘Actually I'm a sore loser and will only be peeved when I don't win.’
    • ‘Let your friends know you are genuinely sorry and that you understand why they're peeved.’
    • ‘I'm just peeved the second half is so uninteresting compared to the first.’
    • ‘I was peeved by her reaction, that she would be embarrassed, instead of being proud of me.’
    • ‘One such member was peeved at the way in which computer terminals were lying unused.’
    • ‘She was peeved that I wasn't able, at a moment's notice, to take half an hour to help her dress.’
    • ‘Neil was peeved when I refused his request for a prescription for penicillin.’
    irritate, annoy, anger, vex, bother, provoke, displease, upset, exasperate, agitate, gall, irk, get someone's back up, put someone's back up, disgruntle, put out, pique, rankle with, nettle, bait, goad, needle, get on someone's nerves, ruffle, ruffle someone's feathers, make someone's hackles rise, raise someone's hackles
    irritated, annoyed, cross, angry, angered, furious, enraged, in a temper, bothered, vexed, displeased, disgruntled, dissatisfied, indignant, upset, exasperated, galled, irked, put out, aggrieved, offended, affronted, resentful, piqued, nettled, ruffled, in high dudgeon
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noun

informal
  • A cause of annoyance.

    ‘another peeve of mine is these so called reality shows’
    • ‘My biggest peeve with the book was a lack of examination of the band's songs.’
    • ‘On the gaming critique front I figure it's best to put one of my biggest gaming peeves in the first edition.’
    • ‘This is more of a personal peeve, but I find it really annoying when characters in fight scenes yell during the final attack.’
    • ‘My peeve of the morning is people treating me like a moron and wasting my time.’
    • ‘My peeve is with group blogs that put the writer's name at the end of items.’
    • ‘I'll have to add one of my big peeves are folks who completely miss that part.’
    • ‘Even if your peeve is petty, it can still be seriously irritating.’
    • ‘Yolanda often reminded people that Kayleigh's biggest peeve was to be interrupted while working, and Kayleigh took her peeves seriously.’
    • ‘Having to go into a discussion about phonetics with nearly every person I meet is my major peeve.’
    • ‘I so understand the grammar peeve - "irregardless" is my biggest weakness - but, um, lots of well-educated people use bad grammar.’
    • ‘One peeve of mine is these so called reality shows.’
    • ‘My biggest peeve is when people pick on those they know (or think) are weaker than them.’
    • ‘Before you have a freak-out over her nail biting, be sure your peeve doesn't have deeper roots.’
    • ‘I'm just telling you to put your peeves in perspective - whether smaller or larger focus.’
    • ‘If she saw the film without you, don't take it out on her by nit-picking over peeves you never even noticed before.’
    • ‘He then asked if any of the readers had any pet hates which they wanted to get off their chests, so he would air their peeves in the column too.’
    • ‘If corruption is his peeve, then it is time to close in on the innumerable private colleges across the country that charge students much much more and provide them with worthless degrees at the end of it all.’
    • ‘Though I spend a fair amount of time in his company, I nurse a particular peeve against him.’
    • ‘I have the audacity to believe all my peeves are rational, but will justify naming one of those because there's bound to be someone who thinks otherwise.’
    • ‘Martin's peeve is poorly planned development.’
    irritant, source of irritation, source of vexation, annoyance, source of annoyance, thorn in someone's flesh, thorn in someone's side, pinprick, pest, bother, trial, torment, plague, inconvenience, nuisance, bugbear, menace
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Origin

Early 20th century: back-formation from peevish.

Pronunciation

peeve

/piːv/