Definition of pedestrianism in English:

pedestrianism

noun

  • See pedestrian

    • ‘By this extraordinary effort of pedestrianism, he netted the sum of a hundred guineas, which had been staked on his success.’
    • ‘His new book, Walking through Scotland's History, examines pedestrianism from Roman Legions to travelling folk, via missionaries and Jacobites.’
    • ‘It would be churlish to note the disparity between Spark's fastidious energy and the pedestrianism of this book, were the disparity not so glaring.’
    • ‘As a sport, running is the present day version of 'pedestrianism', which originated in eighteenth century Britain and came to Australia in the mid-nineteenth century.’
    • ‘Pedestrianism had become hugely popular, and the newspapers of the day were enthusiastically playing up the challenge.’
    • ‘It's not clear whether cordoning pedestrians off for a special festival day is better for pedestrianism than having everyday neighbourhoods (like Kensington) where it's easy to get around by foot, where accident rates are low and where cars routinely cede the way to pedestrians and bikes.’
    • ‘He has moved from iconoclasm to pedestrianism, and is increasingly incoherent.’

Pronunciation

pedestrianism

/pɪˈdɛstrɪənɪz(ə)m/