Definition of peculiarly in English:

peculiarly

adverb

  • 1as submodifier More than usually; especially.

    ‘some patients were peculiarly difficult to cure’
    • ‘In my view, the relationship with Linda was so difficult and so peculiarly distressing upon him, that it heightened those personality weaknesses.’
    • ‘He writes openly and very simply about his struggles with faith, explaining, for example, how he has always found prayer and Bible reading peculiarly difficult.’
    • ‘While the other threads were developed and resolved, leaving one rather exhausted and peculiarly unsatisfied, this one remained outstanding, haunting the reader's memory.’
    • ‘A commonplace observation on my part, a piece of naïveté perhaps, but this fact has been peculiarly neglected in so many recent commentaries about violence on the screen.’
    • ‘But for all the speeches, the acres of coverage and hours of TV footage, marking the anniversary proved a peculiarly difficult task.’
    • ‘He ended up in jail because he was peculiarly stubborn, and quite possibly also stupid, but mostly because he was unlucky.’
    • ‘The industry's unpopularity makes its stocks peculiarly appealing now, particularly if we're on the cusp of a new bull market.’
    • ‘This is not a role for which Latin and Greek are unusually appropriate, but neither are they peculiarly inappropriate.’
    • ‘To be subject to such tyrants is, moreover, a peculiarly terrible fate, since one cannot escape servitude by running away.’
    • ‘He pulled his cigarette spiritlessly, and his voice was peculiarly dead and monotonous.’
    • ‘It never ceases to amaze me just how peculiarly idiotic the occasional individual can be.’
    • ‘Added to this, there is something peculiarly odd about sports fans - football fans in particular.’
    • ‘Judging the actual records of these ministers is a peculiarly difficult task, since it involves working with the figures they themselves provided, figures which may have been accidentally or deliberately misleading.’
    • ‘This is so peculiarly unfair and denies our legitimate free right of way, that we are not likely to be deterred from being taken to court to dispute your estimate.’
    • ‘However, despite its very good intentions, the museum seems peculiarly ill-equipped to deal with the difficult questions raised by recent events.’
    exceptionally, particularly, specially, very, extremely, singularly, peculiarly, distinctly, unusually, extraordinarily, extra, uncommonly, uniquely, remarkably, strikingly, outstandingly, amazingly, incredibly, awfully, terribly, really, unwontedly, notably, markedly, decidedly, surprisingly, conspicuously, signally
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  • 2In an unusual way; oddly.

    ‘the town is peculiarly built’
    • ‘It was probably the unusual and peculiarly charming gait thus presented that attracted the sculptor's notice and that still, after so many centuries, riveted the eyes of its archaeological admirer.’
    • ‘The impulse to write things down is a peculiarly compulsive one, inexplicable to those who do not share it, useful only accidentally, only secondarily, in the way that any compulsion tries to justify itself.’
    • ‘Recently, I was watching a cable channel that programs fashion shows almost continuously and noticed that the long-legged models prancing in high heels seem to walk peculiarly.’
    • ‘We also found a smashing exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art (which appears, peculiarly, not to have a working website), mostly consisting of temporary rooms and buildings buried in sand.’
    • ‘One day, when I was in my teens, I wanted something new to read, so I went into the study and looked around on my parents's bookshelves and found this peculiarly titled book.’
    • ‘However, they have to reverse out of a small, narrow and peculiarly shaped space and it's not going to be easy.’
    exceptionally, particularly, specially, especially, very, extremely, singularly, peculiarly, distinctly
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  • 3Used to emphasize restriction to an individual or group.

    as submodifier ‘the peculiarly British hobby of brass rubbing’
    • ‘It's taken me nearly thirty-two years, but I think that I have finally come to truly appreciate the peculiarly British (minus Scottish) institution that is the Bank Holiday.’
    • ‘Instead she has chosen to gather a harvest more distinctively and peculiarly her own, a decision that sounds more sensible with each subsequent listen.’
    • ‘Group participation is a peculiarly Chinese characteristic of the back-to-nature movement.’
    • ‘It is a conceit to pretend that New Year festivities are somehow peculiarly Scottish though there were particular reasons for their retention and the special regard in which they were held.’
    • ‘If you've never experienced the joys of this peculiarly British institution, they are basically an excuse for people with too much time on their hands to wield a little bit of power, in an attempt to brighten up their empty little lives.’
    • ‘University education is a benefit that accrues peculiarly to the individual.’
    • ‘In person he is hugely entertaining, with that peculiarly American combination of self-confidence and impeccable manners.’
    • ‘I don't know whether or not this is a peculiarly Australian characteristic, but I have no doubt that in this country, people have a deep aversion to believing that their government is incompetent.’
    • ‘It was supposed to be a panacea for the jobless, founded on the peculiarly European notion that if more people work less (but keep the same salaries as when they worked more) lots of good jobs will be created.’
    • ‘If we allow this ban to go through unopposed, we are giving the government permission to criminalise people who pursue an activity that most people disapprove of on no better grounds than a peculiarly British snobbery.’
    • ‘Rapidly, without my parents becoming aware of it, or my even knowing it, this peculiarly English territory, became my favourite hang-out spot.’
    • ‘My appreciation for all things peculiarly British, let alone particular to the westcountry, rose a notch yesterday whilst sat at Taunton station waiting for the bus to Minehead.’
    • ‘It conveys a tension between courtesy and awkwardness that is peculiarly English, as Motion mumbled a humiliating ‘thank you’ to his tormentors after they grew tired of bullying him.’
    • ‘They are the ones who haven't shaved, who slouch in a peculiarly English manner, who are not dealing with the heatwave by wearing khaki shorts.’
    • ‘The impression is thereby given that an emphasis on revival is a peculiarly Welsh phenomenon.’
    • ‘It does not tell us why or how a particular want can have, among all of a person's desires, the special property of being peculiarly his own.’

Pronunciation

peculiarly

/pɪˈkjuːlɪəli/