Definition of pectin in English:

pectin

noun

  • [mass noun] A soluble gelatinous polysaccharide which is present in ripe fruits and is used as a setting agent in jams and jellies:

    ‘the very early stalks may not have quite enough natural pectin to set properly’
    [count noun] ‘two common types of soluble fibre are pectins and gums’
    • ‘It also helps to understand what makes jam or jelly set: it's pectin, a natural substance that binds the fruit pulp with acid and sugar.’
    • ‘No differences were observed for hemicellulose and pectin.’
    • ‘Jelly, jam and preserves are all made from fruit mixed with sugar and pectin.’
    • ‘As a very smart scientist discussed with me a year ago, tomatoes contain pectin - a lot of pectin.’
    • ‘Imagine you are making jam and have gotten to the point where you pour the steaming liquor of fruit, sugar, and pectin into the jars.’
    • ‘They are high in fibre and a substance called pectin, both of which may help to control cholesterol levels in the bloodstream.’
    • ‘One is pectin, a soluble fiber that has a well-documented ability to lower total cholesterol.’
    • ‘In the ripening stage of strawberry fruit development the vascular tissue comprises long fibres composed of cellulose, protein, pectin, and lignin.’
    • ‘Soluble fiber, including pectin, is found in oatmeal, apples, bananas, beans, and psyllium.’
    • ‘The fruit contains more pectin than regular strawberries, so making jam is easy and quick.’
    • ‘Walls consist of a porous network of cellulose fibrils, hemicellulose, pectins, and glycoproteins.’
    • ‘As pears are dense, they are also a good source of fibre and pectin.’
    • ‘To extract pectin from fruit, industry uses a conventional heating process that takes an hour or more per batch.’
    • ‘Proteins, pectins, polysaccharides and glycolipids, organized in a three-dimensional polygonal frame are part of the structural elements.’
    • ‘Other prebiotic agents such as psyllium seeds, pectin, aloe vera juice or slippery elm are very good alternatives.’
    • ‘The standard method, which does not require added pectin, works best with fruits naturally high in pectin.’
    • ‘As the fruit ripens, enzymes convert this into pectin, the quantity of which reaches its maximum just before the fruit is fully ripe.’
    • ‘This may be due to the soluble fiber pectin in grapefruit.’
    • ‘Apples are also rich in the soluble fibre pectin, which helps to lower blood cholesterol.’
    • ‘I ended up using only 1oz of pectin which was more than enough.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from Greek pektos congealed (from pēgnuein make solid) + -in.

Pronunciation:

pectin

/ˈpɛktɪn/