Main definitions of peak in English

: peak1peak2

peak1

noun

  • 1The pointed top of a mountain.

    ‘tatters of fog clung to the peak of the mountain’
    • ‘White clouds cling to lofty mountain peaks, which rise vertically from out of glacial basins, stretching all the way back to the Southern Alps.’
    • ‘Running down each side of the valley are mountain peaks dotted with dormant volcanoes.’
    • ‘Behind him the skyline was still dominated by the White Mountains, their snowy peaks glistening in the afternoon sun.’
    • ‘It winds up through rolling hills with stands of poplar trees, distant views of lakes and snowy mountain peaks strung along the horizon.’
    • ‘How it ended up on the peak of a snowy mountain (located over a crocodile lake and through a blue tunnel) is a question we'll have to save for another day.’
    • ‘Beyond these cities stood the snowy peaks of this spectacular mountain range.’
    • ‘Far off in the horizon, the peaks of various mountains were visible.’
    • ‘The county has some of the most mountainous terrain in the state, including Virginia's highest mountain peaks, which made transportation difficult.’
    • ‘Mountain peaks surround the lake and protect it.’
    • ‘And the giant mountains with their snowy peaks and endless trees remind me of you.’
    • ‘Apart from the cliffs and headwalls at the peak, the mountain requires a lot of straight skiing to maintain speed.’
    • ‘Beyond the farmhouse and its protective line of trees, lie rising foothills and distant mountain peaks.’
    • ‘The weather in southwestern Germany, with its mountain peaks and rolling hills, can turn nasty in a hurry.’
    • ‘Finally the flood waters fell and mountain peaks emerged.’
    • ‘At the exact moment she touched the tallest peak of the mountain, the birds all rose into the air.’
    • ‘The moorland is screened by the peaks of mountains.’
    • ‘The forest below and the sky above clashed on the horizon with jagged peaks of mountains.’
    • ‘The visitor is mesmerized by its sunny beaches, snowy mountain peaks, endless plains where black bulls graze, shimmering lakes and mountain streams.’
    • ‘Recently, my wife and I experienced the snowy white peaks of Maine's mountains illuminated by pink dawns and golden sunsets.’
    • ‘It could be the top of a tower, or a mountain peak, or a cliff.’
    summit, top, crest, pinnacle, mountaintop, spire, heights, brow, apex, crown, tip, cap, vertex, acme, zenith, apogee
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A mountain with a pointed top.
      ‘he climbed his last Swiss peak at the age of 80’
      • ‘The sky is turquoise, though clouds are bunching up against the peaks of the Absaroka Range in the Washakie Wilderness, where we are headed.’
      • ‘On a steep site facing south-east overlooking the peaks of the Vardousia range across the valley, it is arranged as a little three-storey tower.’
      • ‘The Transylvanian Alps in the central region contain the highest peak, Mount Moldoveanu.’
      • ‘Make an early start and allow ample time if you want to see the best reflections in Lake Matheson of Mount Cook and Mount Tasman, impressive peaks in the Southern Alps.’
      • ‘From the summits of the peaks, you can even glimpse Mount Whitney on a clear day.’
      • ‘The views to the East and South are dominated with blue skies and the snow covered peaks of Mount Adams and Mount Hood.’
      • ‘The highest peak is Mount Apo in Mindanao at 9,689 feet.’
      • ‘The peaks above them rose high, much higher than any mountain had before.’
      • ‘The canyons between the peaks seemed bottomless and forbidding, and the mountain range stretched on for unseen miles in both directions.’
      • ‘The highlands of this park are forested with the peak of Mount Meru rising above the forests to dominate the area.’
      • ‘Where the White Mountains come to an end is the great peak of Mount Mindolluin.’
      • ‘Its world wonders range from Andean peaks to Amazonian wilderness; from the endless horizons of the pampas to the awesome glaciers of Patagonia.’
      • ‘The over 100 volcanic peaks in the range, some over 3,000 metres in elevation, include more than a dozen which are considered active.’
      • ‘Five other peaks in the range have long been opened for international mountaineering.’
      mountain, hill, height, alp, aiguille, serac, puy, crag, tor, inselberg
      View synonyms
  • 2A projecting pointed part or shape.

    ‘whisk two egg whites to stiff peaks’
    • ‘Every tree seems to me to be shaped as a peak uniquely designed for the very spot it stands in.’
    • ‘Whisk the egg whites until they make soft peaks then fold into the chocolate mixture.’
    • ‘Beat the egg whites to stiff peaks, then fold through gently.’
    • ‘Before I quite realized what was happening, one rose up in an oddly shaped peak and slapped me on the side of the head.’
    • ‘We named our phenomenal prominence Igloo since the peak of it was shaped like an ice dome.’
    • ‘Beat egg whites until stiff peaks form and fold into batter.’
    • ‘It is cone shaped with a depression scooped out of its peak.’
    • ‘Trim to a triangular shape, leaving the peak as high as possible.’
    • ‘Whip cream into soft peaks and fold in egg white mixture.’
    • ‘The position and shape of the peaks did not change with increasing time of incubation.’
    • ‘Beat the egg whites until they stand in soft peaks.’
    • ‘Its shape has characteristic peaks and troughs.’
    • ‘Beat four of the egg whites to stiff peaks with the salt.’
    • ‘In a separate bowl, whisk egg whites to soft peaks and fold into the mixture.’
    • ‘Whip the egg whites to stiff peaks and fold gently into the batter with a spatula.’
    • ‘He had a case too, and his was shaped like a pyramid with a rounded peak.’
    • ‘The shapes of the peaks are broader and less asymmetric.’
    • ‘If you look closely, the peaks resemble a sleeping chief.’
    • ‘He noticed Hunter and Brandon heading up a slight incline to the peak of a small mound, and chased after them.’
    • ‘The paint, like whipped egg-whites, can hold peaks, and dry in the same shape in which it is applied.’
    1. 2.1British A stiff brim at the front of a cap.
      • ‘In addition there was a fellow in a brown bowler hat, another in a shapeless cloth cap with a peak, and both added their encouragements, turning to Waistcoat in a laconic collusion.’
      • ‘Kitted out in his team-issue polo shirt, the peak of his baseball cap shading his outdoor complexion, short sleeves revealing the power in his forearms still.’
      • ‘A ponytail of strawberry blond hair hung casually below the reversed peak of her baseball cap.’
      • ‘Tamely scooting up and down for hours on end is a poor substitute for triple loops and double back flips while still holding on to the peak of your baseball cap with one hand.’
      • ‘I along with many other men occasionally wear a hat with a peak to protect my eyes from the sun's rays.’
      • ‘My hand sort of began to creep up to the peak of the hat - I felt a salute coming on.’
      brim, visor
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 The narrow part of a ship's hold at the bow or stern.
      ‘further storage is found in the bow peak’
      • ‘It looked like an ornament, like something at the front peak of a ship, a statue of some sort.’
    3. 2.3 The upper, outer corner of a sail extended by a gaff.
      as modifier ‘the peak halyard’
  • 3The point of highest activity, quality, or achievement.

    ‘he was at his peak as a cricketer’
    ‘package holiday sales hit a peak of around 12 million’
    • ‘At the peak of the project it employed 167 people.’
    • ‘‘They are at their peak,’ petitions the Celtic manager.’
    • ‘His shares rode the dotcom boom all the way up to $130, making his 30,000 free share options worth almost $4 million at their peak.’
    • ‘At his peak he was almost unstoppable and only the quality of competition limited his Scotland appearances to two.’
    • ‘At their peak, cassette sales alone brought in an estimated $50 million annually.’
    • ‘By April 6, 1919, the agitations were at their peak.’
    • ‘But as time passed, he no longer was at his peak, and the quality of his troops declined, while his enemies had learned their lessons.’
    • ‘It would take time to get back to my physical peak.’
    • ‘The project at peak employed some 3,500 workers; more than fifty percent of the current workforce is from Point Fortin.’
    • ‘He's at his physical peak now and has the great inner confidence that comes with winning the world championship.’
    • ‘At their peak in 1998, the shares were worth £17.68.’
    • ‘The activity hits a peak and then comes back down around six months.’
    • ‘At the peak of the 18-month project more than 600 workers were employed on site and over one million construction hours worked.’
    • ‘His personal assets stood at more than 600 million yuan at their peak.’
    • ‘At its peak, about 60 workers were involved with the project, which took a little over a year to complete.’
    • ‘At its peak, there were 3,439 workers on the project and tradesmen queued for the chance of a job.’
    • ‘But at his peak, from 1947-1955, he dominated the box office and television ratings.’
    • ‘He's happy. ‘Ricky's just about at his peak, now and over the next couple of years.’
    • ‘My muscles, then at their peak, seemed to just explode with energy when called upon.’
    • ‘I was 27 years old at the peak of my physical abilities.’
    height, high point, high spot, pinnacle, summit, top, highlight, climax, culmination, consummation, epitome, apex, zenith, ascendancy, crowning point, peak of perfection
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 A point in a curve or on a graph, or a value of a physical quantity, higher than those around it.
      ‘a slight increase in velocity provides a second peak on the general velocity curve’
      • ‘This essentially gives them sensitivity curves with very broad peaks, so their visual systems are nearly spectrally neutral.’
      • ‘What happens in all these cases is that a small number of CDs or whatever sell in enormous quantities, forming a peak on the graph.’
      • ‘It is taken as the point at which the curve exhibits a peak or maintains a continuous displacement increase with no further increase in pull.’
      • ‘The average likelihood shows a bell-shaped curve with the peak at the QTL position.’
      • ‘As expected, loop regions show more motion than helical regions, which is reflected in the larger deviations from the starting point as indicated by peaks in the graph.’
      • ‘Eventually, however, the peak of the curve is reached, and further increases in stress cause a decline in performance.’
      • ‘It can be noted that the curve shows close peaks on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, and 6.’
      • ‘Also evident and of concern is the fact that the peak of the graph occurs at 5 SED.’
      • ‘The sweet spot is defined by two lines near the peak of the curve.’
      • ‘However, cell cycle length was unaffected by this treatment, notwithstanding the presence of a small peak in the curve at 14 h.’
      • ‘The inset shows the second differential curves calculated from peaks 7 and 8 of the quinone spectra.’
      • ‘When the data is returned to Earth, the measurements are displayed in graphs as peaks, with the most abundant mineral boasting the tallest peak.’
      • ‘For example, some oil production curves have multiple peaks.’
      • ‘Figure 2a shows a comparison of the ratios of the two peaks of luminescence obtained from full datasets for two separate experiments.’
      • ‘The height of these characteristic peaks indicates the quantity of each element present.’
      • ‘The peaks in the graph represent changes in power due to pairwise LD between the two neutral markers.’
      • ‘A peak in the graph is expected to be centered around a site containing a balanced polymorphism.’
      • ‘When high hardness is the ultimate need, the material must be treated in such a way that the peak of the curve is reached.’
      • ‘Many sets of phones have a response curve featuring peaks and valleys with high amplitude but low bandwidth.’
      • ‘The next step is to chop the copies into different lengths, and these, when graphed, give the peaks that are the profile of the bacteria in that soil.’

verb

  • no object, with adverbial Reach a highest point, either of a specified value or at a specified time.

    ‘the disease peaked in summer’
    • ‘At worst, rates will peak at 4 per cent in 2006 before they start falling again.’
    • ‘The province has finally broken the 50 percent barrier - in 1996 the pass rate peaked at 50 percent, but dropped off again.’
    • ‘Consumption went along with an increase in global growth in 2004, which peaked at about 4.5 per cent.’
    • ‘Values for vineyards peaked in 2000 in the range of $85,000 to $180,000 per acre, but sales activity in 2003 was virtually nil.’
    • ‘The unemployment rate peaked at 8.9 percent in the spring and dropped to 8.4 percent by the end of the year.’
    • ‘The bazaar will usually last for between three and five nights, peaking in popularity and attendance on the first and last nights.’
    • ‘The birth rate peaked in March 1947, long before government intervention took effect.’
    • ‘As the decade wore on, organised employment increased marginally, peaking in 1997.’
    • ‘Economists now believe interest rates could peak at 5.5 per cent or rise even sharper if the housing market and borrowing fail to slow.’
    • ‘As summer temperatures peak, however, most people are wearing the bare minimum that decency allows.’
    • ‘In 1980, the suicide rate in Denmark peaked and reached a level that was among the highest in the world, with 34 suicides per 100 000 inhabitants.’
    • ‘Although oil's price increases may peak in the short-term, the global energy industry is in the throes of a structural transformation.’
    • ‘Farther out, some see rates peaking at 5.25 per cent in the first half of 2005.’
    • ‘The increases in both cases peaked after the recession was over, the result of the time it takes to enact and implement taxes.’
    • ‘British interest rates are likely to peak at 5.25 per cent in 2005, up from the current 4.25 per cent.’
    • ‘The inflation rate which peaked at 8.8 per cent in late September dropped steeply from December to below 5 per cent in January.’
    • ‘Respiratory and pulmonary diseases peaked in cold weather.’
    • ‘In the early part of the last century, most diseases peaked and were subsiding before medicine discovered the cure.’
    • ‘The first wave of killings started over the summer 2003, peaking in early 2004.’
    • ‘The history of sheep is often left in the 1870s, when the value of wool exported peaked at over £3 million.’
    reach its highest point, reach the high point
    View synonyms

adjective

  • 1attributive At the highest level; maximum.

    ‘the canal was restored to peak condition’
    • ‘As the horse was at peak fitness and would have been full of himself, Sheeran prescribed mild sedation to avoid the risk of the horse injuring himself when undergoing treatment in the hydrotherapy unit.’
    • ‘Now, however, they have retreated six to eight percentage points from their peak levels.’
    • ‘And should he come into the ring in peak condition and mindful of the game-plan of his excellent trainer, a very good contest this may well be.’
    • ‘The text is addressed to all performers, athletes, business people, trial lawyers and anyone else who needs guidance on how to work at their peak performance level.’
    • ‘The Swiss crowd always spurs me to perform at peak level.’
    • ‘Actually, yes, it is possible to hold a high, but not peak, level of fitness for a long time.’
    • ‘He had worked himself up to the highest level of peak performance he thought he could - yet a mere boy who had never in his life even thought of being bioenhanced had defeated him.’
    • ‘PC manufacturers developed state-of-the-art thermal solutions to ensure that notebooks run at the peak performance level under normal conditions.’
    • ‘But while the Georgian house has been kept in peak condition, the 260 acres of landscaped grounds have become overgrown and wild.’
    • ‘Also, peak levels of both can be maintained with a limited amount of training.’
    • ‘When someone wins, it's because all facets of the organization are working at a peak level.’
    • ‘With the World Championships in Helsinki starting only two weeks after this meeting, all our top athletes should be in peak condition.’
    • ‘Kerr, in is usual fashion, declined to reveal his team selection after Ireland completed their preparations yesterday on a Lansdowne Road pitch that is in peak condition.’
    • ‘Flush toxins from your body and keep metabolic processes humming along at peak levels.’
    • ‘Consequently you can loose your motivation to continue to train hard and end up in a difficult place, not able to recover your peak performance level.’
    • ‘Thin on top and thick around the thighs, the striker's career has been one long worry about weight, knee complaints and the fight to find the peak condition that comes so easily to others.’
    • ‘It's in peak condition and with a facility like this on our own doorstep, it would be a pity not to use it.’
    • ‘The bullpen is the only area of the team operating at or near peak level.’
    • ‘‘I watch from a distance now and am disappointed neither club is in peak condition,’ he said with understatement.’
    • ‘White, meanwhile, continues his battle for peak fitness and a Yorkshire recall after impressing with an innings of 121 against the Yorkshire Academy last Sunday.’
    maximum, maximal, top, greatest, highest, utmost, uttermost, extreme
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Characterized by maximum activity or demand.
      ‘traffic speeds are reduced at peak hours’
      • ‘Even outside the peak hours, the traffic heading between the north and south of the city is tailing back.’
      • ‘The early evening is a peak period when demand is exceptionally high.’
      • ‘The initiative involves tackling alcohol-fuelled violence in town centres involving extra levels of policing at peak times.’
      • ‘Due to the nature of the position, flexibility is required to meet peak season demands and festive occasions.’
      • ‘Brewers also found 2003 a bitter year as sales of beer and stout continued to decline from the peak levels of 1999 and 2000.’
      • ‘The facility's energy strategies will result in a 67 percent reduction in electric energy use during peak demand hours.’
      • ‘He has a skill as an electrician which is in peak demand.’
      • ‘The plan also calls on employers to consider introducing flexi-times, so that the effect of the peak demand by traffic on the road network can be diluted.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, the peak demand in the city is 226 MW.’
      • ‘Despite having the best network defenses, enterprises were helpless to maintain their peak level of operation.’
      • ‘You can really tell when the traffic peak hours are.’
      • ‘The lethal combination of peak hour traffic and rain had resulted in chaos on the roads.’
      • ‘A third car will also be available for times of peak demand.’
      • ‘People will use their cars less as a result, reducing air pollution, decreasing traffic congestion and lessening peak period demands on public transport.’
      • ‘As a result there have been some changes to shift patterns to better meet demands at peak times.’
      • ‘While the inner ring road has peak hour traffic of 12,000 vehicles, the intermediate ring road has 7,000.’
      • ‘There are options worth exploring to reduce this peak demand.’
      • ‘At present the city struggles to keep traffic moving at peak hours.’
      • ‘I would be surprised if we got back to the peak level of 1999-2000.’
      • ‘During peak hours, traffic is at its highest and it is next to impossible to traverse the road.’

Usage

The word meaning ‘look quickly or furtively’ and ‘a quick or furtive look’ is peek, not peak. See peek

Origin

Mid 16th century: probably a back-formation from peaked, variant of dialect picked ‘pointed’.

Pronunciation

peak

/piːk/

Main definitions of peak in English

: peak1peak2

peak2

verb

[NO OBJECT]archaic
  • Decline in health and spirits; waste away.

    ‘she sat all day, peaking and pining, at the fire-side’

Origin

Early 17th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

peak

/piːk/