Definition of peacetime in English:



  • [mass noun] A period when a country is not at war.

    ‘in peacetime, regiments were billeted upon towns and villages’
    • ‘Moving hundreds of convoys into one of the poorest countries in the world within weeks would probably be impossible in peacetime.’
    • ‘Costs involved in each option will be assessed for both peacetime and wartime.’
    • ‘It is not necessary today to stress upon the importance of iron and iron industry in both war as well as peacetime.’
    • ‘People were calling for the same sorts of controls that were in place in the war to continue in peacetime.’
    • ‘The president realised that their economy was great for making tanks and guns and planes, but what do you do in peacetime?’
    • ‘Those who commit crimes during a political conflict rarely pose a threat to society in peacetime.’
    • ‘We should have the skills to create such systems and control them in peacetime and wartime.’
    • ‘This may accomplish a more effective support to a fleet both in peacetime and in wartime.’
    • ‘The request for such a large number of troops is unprecedented in peacetime.’
    • ‘It will heavily emphasize a nation at war, but festivities will rival those held during peacetime.’
    • ‘Seldom in peacetime has a British government sanctioned such a rate of expenditure increase.’
    • ‘It should be organized and carried out continuously both in peacetime and wartime.’
    • ‘Does war reporting justify a different set of ethics than those applied in peacetime?’
    • ‘The ability of military courts to prosecute civilians ended during peacetime.’
    • ‘Yet, there was no telling how the wartime alliance and its successes would play in peacetime.’
    • ‘The only thought that comes to mind is that this marks the end of peacetime.’
    • ‘He often proved more expert than the experts, both in peacetime economics and in wartime strategy.’
    • ‘Most people know this to be so during wartime, but the same is true during peacetime.’
    • ‘In peacetime, we err on the side of caution, since nothing we do in training is worth the life of one of our soldiers.’
    • ‘Both schemes were considered inappropriate in peacetime post-war Britain.’