Main definitions of pawn in English

: pawn1pawn2

pawn1

noun

  • 1A chess piece of the smallest size and value, that moves one square forwards along its file if unobstructed (or two on the first move), or one square diagonally forwards when making a capture. Each player begins with eight pawns on the second rank, and can promote a pawn to become any other piece (typically a queen) if it reaches the opponent's end of the board.

    • ‘White has his Rook on the seventh rank and Black's queenside pawns are very weak.’
    • ‘While Black's Queen is busy snacking on pawns, White rushes to bring out all his pieces.’
    • ‘He moved his knight forward and deftly captured one of her pawns.’
    • ‘Leon picked up a piece, one of his last pawns, and moved it.’
    • ‘We can see that without Queens on the board Black's doubled pawns severely impair his mobility.’
    • ‘He started at his white pawn and moved it forward two spaces.’
    • ‘A player starts off with a king, a queen, eight pawns, and two each of bishops, knights and rooks.’
    • ‘Floyd replied by moving his murderous pawn one space forward.’
    • ‘All squares from h4 all the way back to h8 are covered by Black's pieces and pawns.’
    • ‘Black nudges lots of pawns forward to the third rank and comes out of his corner slowly.’
    • ‘‘Yes, he said that,’ Gregory said, moving his pawn diagonally to take his companion's bishop.’
    • ‘The game of chess with sword-wielding pawns and deadly queens is both dramatic and mightily beautiful.’
    • ‘Finally when a player promotes a pawn, they swap it for one of the pieces that their partner's opponent is waiting to place on their board.’
    • ‘He looked down at the chess board, at a pawn, and wondered what he would be like.’
    • ‘In one smooth stroke I moved my queen, captured one of her pawns and threatened to put her in check.’
    • ‘He showed me how to move the various kings, queens, and pawns across the exquisite little board.’
    • ‘White cannot prevent the pawns from lining up on the sixth rank.’
    • ‘Rather, I contend that adhering to some principle about not moving such pawns can limit one's play.’
    • ‘Also important is the number of pawns on the board, especially when the minor piece is the knight.’
    • ‘It should be developed on the original diagonal without wasting time to push the second pawn.’
    1. 1.1A person used by others for their own purposes.
      ‘he was a pawn in the game of power politics’
      • ‘Humans are weak, emotional, and dull minded pawns in this endless game of life.’
      • ‘Few wealthy Americans would turn down an old-world honour that money can't buy, but none would wish to be a pawn in a game of transatlantic politics.’
      • ‘Using children as pawns in this game is morally disgusting.’
      • ‘When did it become okay to use students as pawns in a twisted game?’
      • ‘It is a simple role about how she becomes a pawn in the game of life.’
      • ‘Luck has very little to do with romance, other than to maintain the illusion that we are helpless pawns in the game of love.’
      • ‘They were no longer willing to be pawns in the game of power being played out between the Indian and Pakistani governments, or indeed the militants.’
      • ‘Up to now, these nations have been able to play around with terrorists as if they were pawns in this geopolitical game.’
      • ‘And the operatives were only pawns in their ultimate game of cat and mouse.’
      • ‘They are being used as pawns in a political game which will cost lives.’
      • ‘Just smile and nod and try to understand that your professor is merely a pawn in the game of capitalism.’
      • ‘What is happening to our country when well-off landowners can be allowed to treat those less fortunate as pawns in some commercial game?’
      • ‘To her father, she was merely a bargaining tool, a pawn in the game of politics, not a daughter.’
      • ‘Or was he merely a practical pawn in a deadly game?’
      • ‘Do not let the management use her as a pawn in their little game of oppression.’
      • ‘Many times we realise, only in hindsight, that we have been only a pawns in somebody's game.’
      • ‘But as the editor pointed out some weeks ago, we are only a pawn in a game.’
      • ‘For almost 40 years, they were used as pawns in a game that was supposed to prove which system was better.’
      • ‘In other words, homeless people had been used as pawns in a political game.’
      • ‘I was just a pawn in the game between father and son.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French poun, from medieval Latin pedo, pedon- foot soldier, from Latin pes, ped- foot. Compare with peon.

Pronunciation:

pawn

/pɔːn/

Main definitions of pawn in English

: pawn1pawn2

pawn2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Deposit (an object) with a pawnbroker as security for money lent.

    ‘I pawned the necklace to cover the loan’
    • ‘He speaks from experience: back in the beginning, a month after he pawned his cameras, he bought them back with money he made from some of his photographs.’
    • ‘I was so desperate I was down to pawning my grandmother's ring.’
    • ‘The reality is she's out pawning jewelry and he's paying cash for a boat and keeping it a secret.’
    • ‘In earlier centuries, the principal assets people had were their clothes, and they borrowed money by pawning their clothing.’
    • ‘Yep, it's her daughters who are pawning jewellery, working extra shifts and using their holiday time to look after her.’
    • ‘It was the one luxury they enjoyed, and no matter how desperate they might be for money, they never entertained the thought of pawning their computer.’
    • ‘Women pawned their husbands suits every week just to get money for food.’
    • ‘We have been pawning the family silver to pleasure ourselves.’
    • ‘When Florentine grooms gave presents of jewels and clothes to their brides, they expected to retain or reappropriate the use of them at a later date, sometimes lending or pawning them.’
    • ‘And when the fight breaks out, they're the ones picking off all the jewelry and pawning it and selling it on ebay.’
    • ‘A thief pawned a gold ring then snatched it back along with the cash he was being paid for it.’
    • ‘I loved her, really, but I needed to pay for a late payment on my car insurance so I pawned her diamond necklace.’
    • ‘My mother pawned her jewellery to make ends meet and my father went into clinical depression for four years, having lost everything.’
    • ‘However, such was his poverty that the revolutionary seer was reduced to pawning the silver.’
    • ‘I can remember once she told me how she pawned a wedding ring so she could afford to feed a cat in her care.’
    • ‘Now, I'm thinking about pawning the stereo so I can upgrade to a bigger Yahoo mailbox.’
    • ‘Well, he was watching the space where the television would have been if I hadn't pawned it on Saturday to help pay the rent.’
    • ‘With no money to go to Washington D.C. to audition, she had to choose between pawning her karaoke machine or her wedding ring.’
    • ‘Sources said the man purchased a ring at the jewelry store sometime ago, but pawned it at another branch soon afterwards.’
    • ‘After spending six months dancing in the United States, she returned in 1991 and pawned her jewellery to raise start-up cash.’
    pledge, deposit with a pawnbroker, put in pawn, give as security, put up as collateral, put up as security, use as collateral, mortgage
    hock, put in hock
    pop
    View synonyms

noun

Archaic
  • An object left as security for money lent.

    ‘the bank did lend money upon pawns at low interest’

Phrases

  • in pawn

    • (of an object) held as security by a pawnbroker.

      ‘our money was gone and everything was in pawn’
      • ‘Unfortunately, his guitar is in pawn down at the local hock shop because he can't pay his bills on time.’
      • ‘She can't afford to pay off the money all at once and must leave her things in pawn.’
      • ‘A forty-dollar shovel will net you less than six bucks in pawn.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • pawn someone/thing off

    • Pass off someone or something unwanted.

      ‘newly industrialized economies are racing to pawn off old processes on poorer countries’
      • ‘You don't have the inclination or technical wits to employ the older machine as part of a home network, nor a young kid to pawn it off on.’
      • ‘I think you need to think about this the next time you decide to support someone who clearly has taken someone else's solution and tried to pawn it off as her own.’
      • ‘Instead, they pawn it off on the Province's tightfistedness.’
      • ‘It's beyond me why they even make such insubstantial little hook and wire gizmos and pawn them off as security devices.’
      • ‘I'm hoping I can pawn it off on to someone else so it's not at my desk all day.’
      • ‘It will only be a matter of time before they try to pawn it off in the black market.’
      • ‘Prudie is not sure the dinner guests were even trying to pawn these things off as new.’
      • ‘Is it such a normal thing, for fathers to pawn their daughters off like a hawker selling cheap trinkets?’
      • ‘If they are sold over the counter to adults, criminals will no longer have to pawn these goods off on innocent youths.’
      • ‘You don't want the job, or the responsibility that you have, and I can understand that, but don't sell yourself short, and don't try to pawn it off on someone less qualified.’
      • ‘I mean, they've tried to pawn it off on everyone else, why not me?’
      • ‘Still, his partner was going to pay for pawning him off on the woman.’
      • ‘They can steal ideas, for example, and pawn them off as their own.’
      • ‘People could've died, and they'd just pawn it off as a tragic accident.’
      • ‘Both boys are pawned off on grandmothers, who will die early and represent the only selfless love either child will know.’
      • ‘I was able to pawn my copy off over the Internet in less than a day.’
      • ‘It might seem like you're trying to pawn him off, and what if he's not interested in her?’
      • ‘And now her father planned to pawn her off to some clumsy, sword-swinging, foolish son of a peasant?’
      • ‘The federal government pawned this responsibility off to the municipalities.’
      • ‘And, thankfully, at least some of the forms can be pawned off on someone else.’

Origin

Late 15th century (as a noun): from Old French pan pledge, security, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch pand and German Pfand.

Pronunciation:

pawn

/pɔːn/