Definition of pathology in English:

pathology

noun

mass noun
  • 1The science of the causes and effects of diseases, especially the branch of medicine that deals with the laboratory examination of samples of body tissue for diagnostic or forensic purposes.

    ‘research people skilled in experimental pathology’
    • ‘Formaldehyde is used widely as a tissue preservative in pathology laboratories and embalming services.’
    • ‘The question of what constitutes a diagnostic error in anatomic pathology should be addressed.’
    • ‘With slight modification, the questions are organized here into 15 topic categories within pathology informatics.’
    • ‘Experts in anaesthesiology, pathology, gynaecology and radiology are particularly in demand.’
    • ‘The hacker gained initial access through a Linux system in the hospital's pathology department.’
    • ‘The provision of perinatal and paediatric pathology services is a sign of an enlightened society.’
    • ‘The last part of the book recognizes the increasing importance of molecular pathology and genetics.’
    • ‘Several aspects of practice and their effect on surgical pathology consultations were studied.’
    • ‘In British Columbia, pathology laboratories are required by law to report all newly diagnosed cancers to the Registry.’
    • ‘He received many awards and prizes and was president of five medical societies of pathology and ophthalmology.’
    • ‘Science itself was a new, fragile discipline at this time: experimental physiology, pathology, and pharmacology first flourished in Berlin and Paris in the 1820s.’
    • ‘What happens to a bullet once it is turned over to the pathology department?’
    • ‘The instinctive personal preference and familiarity with formalin is an important factor in diagnostic surgical pathology.’
    • ‘The tissue specimens were interpreted by the pathology departments of the respective participating centers.’
    • ‘Some hospital clinical and pathology departments hold regular audits of deaths.’
    • ‘An understanding of the traditional photographic work flow in anatomic pathology is essential to designing a successful digital imaging solution.’
    • ‘In paragraph 1 he gives details of his experience in forensic medicine and pathology.’
    • ‘Six anatomic pathology reports were selected to cover a range of specimens and complexity.’
    • ‘The learning objectives include those related both to general computing and to pathology informatics specifically.’
    • ‘The field of forensic pathology investigates sudden, unnatural, unexplained, or violent deaths.’
    1. 1.1Medicine Pathological features considered collectively; the typical behaviour of a disease.
      ‘the pathology of Huntington's disease’
      • ‘The problems won't be resolved until scientists get a firmer grip on the pathology of the disease.’
      • ‘Semiquantitative analysis of lung pathology confirmed these changes.’
      • ‘Although reduction of mtDNA is a critical factor in type 2 diabetes pathology, the question remains as to the nature of the original insult.’
      • ‘A causal mechanism and the potential reversibility of lung pathology await elucidation.’
      • ‘If the only evaluation is a semen analysis, underlying pathology can be missed.’
    2. 1.2Medicine A pathological condition.
      ‘the dominant pathology is multiple sclerosis’
      • ‘Underlying rotator cuff pathologies should be treated before injection.’
      • ‘Many pathologies were recorded from the remains, such as evidence of poor nutrition, poor dental hygiene and a life of physical, repetitive work.’
      • ‘All had cerebral atrophy, but none had intracranial vascular pathology on magnetic resonance imaging examination.’
      • ‘This section reviews the emerging knowledge on the role of DCs in several major lung pathologies.’
    3. 1.3usually with modifier Mental, social, or linguistic abnormality or malfunction.
      ‘the city's inability to cope with the pathology of a burgeoning underclass’
      • ‘And I think it has led to a lot of the social pathologies that we see in the United States almost 30 years later.’
      • ‘There is the belief that functional brain scanning can individuate mental pathologies in the living brain.’
      • ‘All these moralistic pathologies are likely to impinge on individual liberty and economic efficiency.’
      • ‘At the time, many cities seemed consumed with social pathologies like illegitimacy, crime, and drug addiction.’
      • ‘Despite its lack of an evolutionary perspective, the book has some value for specialists interested in the pathologies of individual belief.’
      • ‘Social scientists, using modern research techniques, now had it in their power to use the state to prevent social pathologies from emerging.’
      • ‘The state associations for speech-language pathology and audiology also maintain listings of licensed and certified therapists.’
      • ‘This, I think, helps explain some modern liberal and leftist pathologies.’
      • ‘To me, outsourcing is a symptom that we have pathologies in our economic system that we must solve.’
      • ‘History teaches us that populism has recurring pathologies; it is especially important to recognize and counteract them.’
      • ‘Others who don't have that degree of pathology might just need behavioral weight loss treatment.’
      • ‘The patient was referred to speech pathology and for psychological counselling.’
      • ‘I do think that mental pathologies can be written, and I think that prose fiction is a particularly good way of doing it.’
      • ‘Others point to long-enduring pathologies of American foreign policy.’
      • ‘School drop-outs, juvenile delinquency, and gang wars were symptoms of underlying social pathology.’
      • ‘Far from virtue, this is pathology, behavior that serves neither the self nor others.’
      • ‘It's also being applied to the correction of speech pathologies.’
      • ‘Economic and social development as twin goals of the developmental state cannot take place under the pathologies of greed, tribalism and incompetence.’
      • ‘My effort, in talking about the pathologies of public opinion, is to root the criticisms in well-established realities of public psychology.’
      • ‘Globalism gratifies the same mental pathologies as Marxism and is therefore perfect for disillusioned intellectuals looking for a new home.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from modern or medieval Latin pathologia (see patho-, -logy).

Pronunciation

pathology

/pəˈθɒlədʒi/