Definition of pass mark in English:

pass mark

noun

  • The minimum mark needed to pass an examination.

    ‘a written assessment with a pass mark of 75 per cent’
    • ‘But anyone who's reached adulthood and remained on the right side of a pass mark is a pleasure to behold: the bright eyes, the confidence, the goodwill and good-heartedness.’
    • ‘Another exam board, OCR, said setting a pass mark of 16 per cent for a grade C on its higher-tier paper showed how difficult the exam was.'’
    • ‘The figures, obtained by The Sunday Times under the new Freedom of Information Act, reveal that the average pass mark in all subjects since 1984 was 47%.’
    • ‘It was a sort of a pass mark but I'd be looking to improve on that.’
    • ‘Every year, the exams quango sets a minimum pass mark for every subject, the stated purpose of which is to ensure that the grade a candidate achieves in a course is comparable to previous and future years.’
    • ‘In 2003, the cut-off for a level 2 pass was 21 out of 50 marks or 42% compared with 2002 when the pass mark was set at 28 out of 50 or 56%.’
    • ‘Reducing the pass mark to ensure fewer failures has long been used for A-levels and the FSA is now doing it for life assurance companies.’
    • ‘She has never scored a pass mark since the survey began.’
    • ‘I'll order immediate action to make sure that never again will the pass mark for an A grade in GCSE Maths be just 45%.’
    • ‘Chinese students expect to be tested more often than their Western counterparts, and the pass mark, I soon discovered, is not 50 per cent but 60 per cent.’
    • ‘At Darton High School in Barnsley they got identical exam results in their GCSEs and A-levels and then both went on to study science and technology at Sheffield University before getting the same pass mark.’
    • ‘According to the national newspapers the pass mark for English eight years ago was 57 marks out of 100.’
    • ‘He passed School Certificate with 232 marks - 200 was the pass mark - but failed University Entrance twice, languishing for two years in the lower sixth form.’
    • ‘There are only two explanations for getting the pass mark.’
    • ‘The points system is stringent, and the pass mark was raised this July.’
    • ‘Things may have changed in the three decades or so since the fearsome Miss Donaldson despaired of my mathematical ineptitude, but more than 50% scored in any examination meant a pass mark when I was at school.’
    • ‘When this happens, examiners lower the pass mark to suit the average, as they can't always gauge the level of difficulty of any exam paper they set.’
    • ‘The pass mark for these are 40%, of which coursework takes up to 60% of the total mark.’
    • ‘Imagine a learner scored a minimum pass mark or more but he or she will leave school life for street life.’
    • ‘However, as it turned out, this was a stroke of luck as anyone obtaining above 60% was forced to carry on with Latin into the third year, those obtaining between the pass mark and 59% did German, and those failing did Spanish.’