Definition of part of the furniture in English:

part of the furniture

phrase

informal
  • A person or thing that has been somewhere so long as to seem a permanent, unquestioned, or invisible feature of the landscape.

    ‘I worked for him for so long I became part of the furniture’
    ‘Marx's views on class and capitalism are part of the furniture of the modern mind’
    • ‘Pigeon flocks have almost become a part of the furniture in York, with the birds gathering in most squares and open spaces.’
    • ‘Sounds improbable, but Dave Bassett has become part of the furniture at Oakwell.’
    • ‘He was obviously a really good con man, giving the impression that he was part of the furniture down at Clifton.’
    • ‘Having worked in Guiseley for so long, I feel that I am part of the furniture.’
    • ‘One effect of being invited to respond glibly to horror on an almost daily basis has been to domesticate it, to get us used to it as if it were part of the furniture.’
    • ‘I mentioned it to Henrik way back that he is far from being considered just part of the furniture here.’
    • ‘‘In fact, people will be intrigued at first until they get used to it and then it will become part of the furniture,’ she said.’
    • ‘For many years the trophies have been part of the furniture at the 82-year-old Walton and Frinton Yacht Club.’
    • ‘Here is a tavern where cheques are cashed to the value of £100 and Havana cigars are part of the furniture.’
    • ‘Certain shows have a habit of becoming part of the furniture so you feel a loss when they're gone.’
    • ‘She's like part of the furniture - people always expect her to be there.’
    • ‘It's not poetic, but I guess the closest comparison is that she was like part of the furniture.’
    • ‘By filming the show in such a way as to essentially turn the audience into part of the furniture, we get to be in on the jokes, without being the butt of them.’
    • ‘At first the cameras are a bit daunting, but by the end they are just part of the furniture.’
    • ‘This seems very much the sense that Corbett has of himself: a cheery part of the furniture, a nothing flash but nonetheless welcome fixture.’