Definition of parson in English:

parson

noun

  • 1A beneficed member of the clergy; a rector or a vicar.

    • ‘This was about the clerk of that parish, whose wife used to wash the parson's surplices.’
    • ‘One of the parson's duties is to encourage and help parishioners find suitable employment.’
    • ‘Soon she is the quarry of both the parson, who wants to keep her innocence intact, and the hard-drinking, fox-hunting squire, who wants his wicked way with her.’
    • ‘Deference to the squire and the parson was often a façade, masking constant challenges to authority by poaching and more explicit threats of rick-burning.’
    • ‘Some of your boys can thank a Texas parson for being alive today’
    • ‘In her view ‘doctors, schoolmasters, bank managers and parsons were all respected members of the community’ and she was determined that her son should join them.’
    • ‘The parson told the magistrates that he knew nothing of his niece's whereabouts until he saw the notice in the newspapers.’
    • ‘You tell us not to believe what parsons say about religion.’
    • ‘Does the idea of a club having its own priest, reverend, or parson seem ridiculous?’
    • ‘He was a good parson, and I am happy to have been introduced to his life by such a reliable biographer.’
    • ‘The parson goes on to deliver an eloquent sermon on Christian acceptance.’
    • ‘He was a humorous and gentle pastor of his flock, a good parson who put up a new poster every week to attract people to come to his church.’
    • ‘As a form of greeting, parsons should make a regular point of blessing those they meet as an alternative to more ‘worldly’ salutations.’
    • ‘The parson had assured him that I was a hard worker, so he took me.’
    • ‘He wanted to be a monk, not a busy town parson continually beset by unreasonable people.’
    • ‘It is brought home to me in one of the few permitted churches, where the parson has to submit his sermons to the censors a month in advance.’
    • ‘The King James Bible was meant to be read in churches, and the idea was that if you didn't gloss it, people wouldn't be able to understand it properly, and they'd have to come to church and they'd have to ask the parson in the normal way to teach.’
    • ‘This story follows a witch hunt through a 17th century village, with the parson's wife, Anne, trying to save an old woman from being burned at the stake and ending up denounced herself for witchcraft.’
    • ‘This seems especially true of recent fiction written by people who have never served a parish as its parson.’
    • ‘But, for the modern Episcopalian, the country parson is probably an ideal figure, remote and more longed for than experienced.’
    vicar, rector, clergyman, member of the clergy, cleric, chaplain, pastor, curate, churchman, man of the cloth, man of god, ecclesiastic, minister, priest, preacher, divine
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    1. 1.1informal Any member of the clergy, especially a Protestant one.
      • ‘While it was fronted largely by bluff Protestant parsons, it was backed by Stalin's branch office in the Australian Communist Party.’
      • ‘‘A Protestant country parson is probably the best object of a modern idyll.’’
      • ‘But a Protestant parson also visited the place.’
      • ‘Georg Frobenius's father was Christian Ferdinand Frobenius, a Protestant parson, and his mother was Christine Elizabeth Friedrich.’
      • ‘He too, son and grandson of Lutheran parsons, started off as a pious, dutiful boy and then, to borrow Turner's words, followed ‘the typical pattern of Victorian loss of Protestant religious faith.’’
      vicar, rector, clergyman, member of the clergy, cleric, chaplain, pastor, curate, churchman, man of the cloth, man of god, ecclesiastic, minister, priest, preacher, divine
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French persone, from Latin persona ‘person’ (in medieval Latin ‘rector’).

Pronunciation

parson

/ˈpɑːs(ə)n/