Definition of parliament in English:

parliament

noun

  • 1(in the UK) the highest legislature, consisting of the Sovereign, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons.

    ‘the Secretary of State will lay proposals before Parliament’
    ‘an Act of Parliament’
    • ‘Some of the proposals in the White Paper will need to be passed by Parliament before they can go ahead.’
    • ‘The annual budget only comes into force once the President of the Parliament has signed it.’
    • ‘The Head of State was a President who was elected by Parliament for seven years.’
    • ‘It is now up to the Commission to submit a new, or the same, proposal to the Parliament.’
    • ‘Anyone care to tell me whether this bill made it though Parliament this week?’
    • ‘The Bill passed the committee stage and is now close to sailing through Parliament.’
    • ‘The Parliament can request the Commission to draft legislation for debate in any area.’
    • ‘So Parliament must get on with making this new law effective as soon as possible.’
    • ‘Rather, it is a case of the Parliament choosing its battles more judiciously than in the past.’
    • ‘If Parliament had any such intention, it would surely have made its intention plain.’
    • ‘If this does not occur, the next step is for the Parliament to have its second reading of the budget.’
    • ‘He has suggested it to no one connected with the Parliament, nor is he willing to.’
    • ‘Electioneering promises that go beyond the life of a Parliament are thus mere wind.’
    • ‘The courts are to have due regard to the legislation as an expression of the will of Parliament.’
    • ‘The Parliament has the power to reject the budget and fire the Commission if it so chooses.’
    • ‘There is a view that our Parliament has fallen in esteem because of legislation from Europe.’
    • ‘It is not difficult to understand the reason Parliament adopted the approach that it did.’
    • ‘We need a House with more scientists; we have enough lawyers in Parliament as it is.’
    • ‘To move it could involve changing an act of Parliament which governs the use of the downs.’
    • ‘Her main supporters in the Parliament have stood aside for her, but at what price?’
    1. 1.1 The members of Parliament between one dissolution and the next.
      ‘the act was passed by the last parliament of the reign’
      • ‘I was delighted when we won the referendum and becoming a member of the parliament was the icing on the cake.’
      • ‘Rather than lose the vote, she dissolved parliament on October 10 and called an early election.’
      • ‘Parliament may pass a human rights act, but a future parliament could repeal or emasculate it.’
      • ‘Members of a corrupt parliament are ready to make deals with whomsoever has anything to offer.’
      • ‘In November 1987, a new parliament was elected and a new cabinet appointed.’
      • ‘This was not helped by the fact that the new Parliament was patently not ready for the occasion.’
      • ‘For centuries Britain, and now almost all nations, has relied on elected parliaments, congresses, prime ministers and presidents to set the rules.’
      • ‘The country elects a new parliament in February, lawmakers more closely aligned than ever before with President Mohammad Khatami.’
      • ‘Both of these were bills that were lost when parliament dissolved for the election.’
      • ‘The next governments, presidents and parliaments had a quite inconsistent policy towards the BOC.’
      • ‘He has been a member of Parliament in five parliaments.’
      • ‘He can dissolve the parliament, and nominate people to all the key state functions.’
      • ‘Again there is doubt over funding increases in the final two years of the Parliament.’
      • ‘As a professed radical, he was to prove a singularly jaded observer of parliaments, parliamentary processes, and parliamentarians.’
      the houses of parliament, westminster, the house of commons, the house of lords, the commons, the lords, the house, the lower house, the upper house, the mother of parliaments
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A legislature similar to the UK Parliament in other nations and states.
      ‘the Russian parliament’
      • ‘Even if national parliaments tried to come to grips with such developments, they would fail.’
      • ‘The Council of Ministers is not accountable to the European Parliament or national parliaments.’
      • ‘Furthermore, the 216 votes include those of the Netherlands and of Germany against the will of the national parliaments of those countries.’
      • ‘The key powers over taxation, foreign affairs and defence remain with the national parliaments.’
      • ‘To make free market reforms possible, many of the powers handed over to Brussels in previous treaties will have to be transferred back to national parliaments.’
      • ‘National parliaments have a ‘right to reply’, but not a right to cause the original legislation to be withdrawn.’
      • ‘It shows that national parliaments will have no say over privacy, and instead there will be a continent-wide right of the authorities to bug us.’
      • ‘He approves of the Scottish Parliament and says its critics should give it time.’
      • ‘Political parties across Australia are chock-full of people of who would happily sell their souls for a seat in one or other of the nation's parliaments.’
      • ‘Let us have proposals to it from the national parliaments.’
      • ‘Greater control by national parliaments and the European Parliament would represent a positive move.’
      • ‘Other countries are putting the accord to a vote in their national parliaments.’
      • ‘His plan is to make us all stakeholders in the new European order by giving the national parliaments of Europe more of a say in what goes on in Brussels and Strasbourg.’
      • ‘The IPU is the representative body of national parliaments in 138 countries.’
      • ‘On internal matters, it allows for more democratic control by the national parliaments and the European Parliament.’
      • ‘In practice the attention paid by national parliaments to EU market legislation is erratic and sporadic.’
      • ‘It boosted the right of national parliaments to stop EU interference in domestic policy.’
      • ‘She has expressed dismay that so many politicians have their eyes on a career at European level and see national parliaments as an obstacle.’
      • ‘The Australian Parliament was united on a declaration of war against the Axis powers.’
      • ‘Most other countries will be able to ratify on the basis of approval by national parliaments.’
      legislature, legislative assembly, congress, senate, chamber, house, upper house, lower house, upper chamber, lower chamber, second chamber, convocation, diet, council, assembly, chamber of deputies
      View synonyms
  • 2rare A group of rooks or owls.

    ‘it is uncommon to see a parliament of owls in the wild’
    • ‘Millions of shoppers are now completely owled out, confronted with a parliament of owls on every shelf in every shop.’
    • ‘A parliament of rooks suddenly broke free of the naked trees, and rose in the air.’
    • ‘In one bush a large parliament of owls softly hooted a welcome which cannot fail to enchant.’
    • ‘We interrupt this video program to bring you a parliament of owls who think a stuffed animal is their mom.’
    • ‘A parliament of rooks skulks around the far side, eyeing us suspiciously.’
    • ‘He tells of his summer long pursuit to convince a parliament of owls to attach themselves to his shoulder.’
    • ‘The city stares in, beaming golden lights like a parliament of owls watching from the darkness.’
    • ‘Quietly follow the “who-who-whos” of the parliament of owls, then move stealthily amongst shadows.’
    • ‘To my right was a stand of ash trees where the cawing parliament of rooks eventually settled.’
    • ‘It has taken weeks of narrowing his walking-vision to the activities of their local parliament of rooks.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French parlement ‘speaking’, from the verb parler.

Pronunciation

parliament

/ˈpɑːləm(ə)nt/