Main definitions of parity in English

: parity1parity2

parity1

noun

  • 1The state or condition of being equal, especially as regards status or pay.

    ‘parity of incomes between rural workers and those in industrial occupations’
    • ‘Even so, you can't expect the DUP to press for the implementation of anything promoting equality of status or parity of esteem since they reject the concepts.’
    • ‘However he understood that in the context of the PPF and bench marking, the issue of pay parity could not be addressed at this stage as there is no local bargaining provision in the PPF.’
    • ‘Other facets of the budget include, for the second consecutive year, a rejection of the traditional principle of pay parity between military and civilian employees of the federal government.’
    • ‘They had also accepted the union's claim for pay parity for retained firefighters and will study demands for equal pay for control room staff.’
    • ‘Solid Energy miners will begin a 48-hour nationwide strike tomorrow as they up the ante in their fight for pay parity between mines.’
    • ‘They had decided that per capita incomes in the developing world would reach some sort of parity with the developed world by 2100.’
    • ‘Guards and conductors with Arriva are seeking pay parity with drivers.’
    • ‘The striking workers want pay parity with their counterparts in the public transportation system.’
    • ‘This has improved conditions for secondary teachers while circumventing the requirement of pay parity with primary teachers.’
    • ‘The move is the start of a rolling industrial action over pay parity with colleagues in acute hospitals in Dublin.’
    • ‘That is far from the truth as I also want a better world with equal parity to men for my wife, daughters, sisters and so on.’
    • ‘And they will reach gross military parity with us, too.’
    • ‘Will it meet the expectations of nurses, who want the government to settle their claim for pay parity in the same way it did for teachers in 2002?’
    • ‘There is a need for increased and sustained investment in community development projects in the midlands so the region can reach parity with other regions in the country.’
    • ‘What they objected to was the possibility of students having equal parity with their superiors on issues such as hiring and promotion.’
    • ‘AUS has justified the pay rises, claiming they want international pay parity.’
    • ‘You'd have to wait for a century to approach a position of parity between the two populations, assuming the same unrealistic growth rates.’
    • ‘If you are talking about reaching parity with Britain and France and Germany, then you have to have a very long road to get there.’
    • ‘An out-of-court settlement cannot be one-sided; it must be based on parity, equity and symmetry, on the principle of give-and-take by both parties.’
    • ‘He feels Australian wines have a long way to go in reaching parity with France.’
    equality, equivalence, uniformity, sameness, consistency, correspondence, congruity, congruence, levelness, unity, coequality, parallelism, evenness
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Equivalent value of one currency in terms of another at an established exchange rate.
      ‘the euro's parity with the dollar’
      [count noun] ‘an attempt to maintain exchange rate parities within the ERM’
      • ‘However, after being launched at a rate of $1.17, the euro rapidly fell to parity with the US currency and then to around 90 cents.’
      • ‘It is worth recalling that from the end of 1923 to the middle of 1925 the exchange rate in dollars relative to the pre-war parity was about a third.’
      • ‘Currency boards offer good shelter from inflation as long as the exchange parity with their dollar or Deutsche mark/euro backing can be maintained.’
      • ‘If there is mutual trust that the exchange rate parities agreed upon are observed, the mobility of capital will lead to identical interest rates, and there will also be a de facto common monetary policy.’
      • ‘The slump in US stocks has weakened the dollar against other currencies, with the euro climbing to parity against the greenback for the first time in over two years on Monday.’
      • ‘Moreover, sharp reversals in market sentiment can put intense pressure on currency parities and shut off a country's access to financial markets.’
      • ‘Hunt thinks it unlikely that the currency will break parity with the dollar next year, and feels it is likely to settle around the $0.92 level.’
      • ‘Argentina devalued its currency, the peso, and ended its parity with the US dollar, a measure introduced 13 years previously in a successful battle against hyperinflation.’
      • ‘Exporters and businesses are increasingly concerned about the performance of sterling over the next few months after the euro breached parity with the dollar last week.’
      • ‘In 1911 Fisher proposed that the gold price changes be uniform and synchronous in the currencies of all countries linked by fixed exchange parities, in proportional amounts related to an international price index.’
      • ‘The news came as the euro fought back against the previous week's dollar gains to make another bid for parity with the US currency.’
      • ‘And yet, the euro remains below parity with the US currency.’
      • ‘Dollarization at current parity would eliminate the currency risk on Argentina's debt so rates could come down.’
      • ‘It is noteworthy that 25 basis point increase of February 3 has thus far not restored the euro to parity with the dollar.’
      • ‘Shoring up domestic output, protecting employment and achieving recovery took precedence over fighting inflation, defending exchange-rate parities or preserving the gold value of the currency.’
      • ‘Analysts started to dig out their old bullish forecasts for the euro, with some predicting parity between the euro and dollar within the next year.’
      • ‘Some countries, particularly Asian ones, have no interest in the parities of major currencies being modified.’
      • ‘According to an American Express survey, Christmas shopping in New York is cheaper this year, and dollar parity with the euro makes it much easier to spot the bargains.’
      • ‘The easiest to implement would be dollarization at current parity.’
      • ‘It is more realistic to examine the medium-term outlook (three to five years) which is for the euro to return to parity with the dollar.’
  • 2Mathematics
    (of a number) the fact of being even or odd.

    • ‘M is the lattice point if and only if x 1 and x 2 are of the same parity and so are y 1 and y 2.’
    1. 2.1Physics
      The property of a spatial wave equation that either remains the same (even parity) or changes sign (odd parity) under a given transformation.
      • ‘In other words, particle interactions should conserve parity.’
      • ‘Elementary particles have far too many properties - such as spin, charge, colour, parity and hypercharge - to be truly elementary.’
    2. 2.2Physics
      The value of a quantum number corresponding to parity.
      • ‘Others, such as parity, are broken by small amounts, and the corresponding conservation law therefore only holds approximately.’
    3. 2.3Computing
      A function whose being even (or odd) provides a check on a set of binary values.
      • ‘The only way to achieve this objective is with redundancy built-in throughout the I / O subsystem and with the data protected by a parity or mirrored array.’
      • ‘Often, during the process of reading all data from the disk to recompute the missing data and parity, bad sectors may be encountered, and it is no longer possible to rebuild the array.’
      • ‘This error management system provides the ability to monitor CRC, parity, and encoding errors.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from late Latin paritas, from par equal.

Pronunciation:

parity

/ˈparɪti/

Main definitions of parity in English

: parity1parity2

parity2

noun

Medicine
  • 1[mass noun] The fact or condition of having borne children.

    ‘the relationship between breast cancer and parity was investigated’
    • ‘Age and parity are important factors in the development of urinary incontinence.’
    • ‘Other potential confounders examined included education, body mass index, age at menarche, hormone replacement therapy, parity, and use of multivitamins.’
    • ‘It found a genetic factor for stress incontinence but not for urge incontinence, which seems to depend more on environmental factors and parity.’
    • ‘However, response appeared to be unrelated to atopic status or parity.’
    • ‘We calculated odds ratios obtained from logistic regression analyses in which we adjusted for the women's age and parity and their mothers' diabetes.’
    1. 1.1The number of children previously borne.
      ‘very high parity (six children or more)’
      • ‘When assessing risk of breast cancer for all mothers, we adjusted for parity and age simultaneously.’
      • ‘Among low risk women, regardless of parity, private patients had higher age adjusted rates of instrumental delivery, especially after epidural.’
      • ‘Response rates were lower in women with manual occupations and from ethnic minorities but did not differ by type of delivery, type of pain relief, parity, or age.’
      • ‘Decades ago, older pregnant women were mainly those with low fecundity or high parity.’
      • ‘Both the stillbirth rate and early neonatal mortality increased with parity.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from parous ‘having borne offspring’(back-formation from adjectives ending in -parous)+ -ity.

Pronunciation:

parity

/ˈparɪti/