Definition of parentage in English:

parentage

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The identity and origins of one's parents:

    ‘a boy of Jamaican parentage’
    • ‘Indeed, common place of origin is often connected with genos, one's origins by common descent and parentage.’
    • ‘Born of Russian parentage, Robin never new his father and it was a standing joke that he would probably bump into him when one of the many Soviet dance troupes visited Wimbledon Theatre.’
    • ‘The idea that people of mixed racial parentage and their descendants may have special needs is increasingly gaining ground.’
    • ‘There are some Moroccans, Algerians, Canadians, Germans, Americans and children with Indonesian and French parentage.’
    • ‘In a smaller community, the members of a subculture - all four of them - would be known by name, background and parentage.’
    • ‘Apparently, the media knew Aaron had secretly given his servant a child to care for, but they mistook the boy's parentage.’
    • ‘I have Welsh parentage, Welsh ancestry, was taught the Welsh language at school, and indeed I have lived in Wales.’
    • ‘A High Court judge yesterday reserved judgment in the first stage of the legal action to help people conceived by donor insemination to discover more about their parentage.’
    • ‘Calves were born between late February and mid May in each calving year and were identified for parentage at birth.’
    • ‘For example, when an offspring and parent share rare alleles, confidence in parentage is higher than when sharing common alleles.’
    • ‘Questioning his parentage vocally I went after him, crawled on my belly under the futon, and strained my arm out to retrieve the little plastic bag.’
    • ‘Most often, children of dual racial parentage are identified with whichever race their physical features most reflect.’
    • ‘This study provides empirical support for the use of likelihood analysis to infer parentage of progeny with multiple compatible parent pairs.’
    • ‘To simulate a situation in which neither parent is known, the assignment of parentage was divided into two parts.’
    • ‘Born in the United States of Barbadian parentage, she must somehow bridge the gap between two identities that are often in conflict.’
    • ‘Weisz, a London native of Hungarian and Austrian parentage, previously appeared in such films as The Mummy, Enemy at the Gates and Runaway Jury.’
    • ‘Or would they adopt the Nazi model and look at parentage to establish how English someone's heritage was?’
    • ‘She knew no parents; those in the Service never learned their parentage.’
    • ‘Well his background, his parentage and his ancestry was Jewish.’
    • ‘Chiluba's parentage and educational background are both in dispute.’
    ancestry, lineage, descent, extraction, roots, background, heredity, pedigree
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The origin of something:
      ‘this ice cream boasts American parentage’
      • ‘In contrast, we quantified the activity of PDC in root tissues from a much larger number of tolerant and intolerant rice lines with a shared parentage.’
      • ‘Each of the 85 varieties profiled is given its own page, illustration and description of its parentage.’
      • ‘A company with French parentage runs the service.’
      • ‘The game I'll play later tonight owes its parentage to a program written in 1958.’
      • ‘Now, every bloody tale from a slasher series such as Halloween to the video nasties of the 1970s can trace some element of their parentage back to Psycho.’
      • ‘He slammed his fist down on the snooze button and brought into question its parentage.’
      • ‘But big decisions like this always have a myriad of motivations behind them and multiple parentage.’
      origins, extraction, birth, family, ancestry, lineage, heritage, pedigree, descent, line of descent, line, blood, bloodline, stock, paternity, roots, derivation
      filiation, stirps
      View synonyms

Origin

Late 15th century: from Old French.

Pronunciation

parentage

/ˈpɛːr(ə)ntɪdʒ/