Definition of parallelism in English:

parallelism

noun

mass noun
  • 1The state of being parallel or of corresponding in some way.

    ‘Greek thinkers who believed in the parallelism of microcosm and macrocosm’
    • ‘Elsewhere, Kothari instructs the spectator to ‘look for the symmetrical reduplication and repetitive parallelism of dance patterns’.’
    • ‘Their journeys intertwine and overlap, and during sequences in which they go their separate but parallel ways, director Gustad employs jarring cross-cutting to remind us of their journeys' thematic parallelisms.’
    • ‘Orhan Veli's work is also full of repetition and parallelisms.’
    • ‘This is a play that works on its audience through juxtapositions (both ironic and evocative) and parallelisms that remind us that questions of self-identity in a shifting world are and will always be with us.’
    • ‘Such parallelism can be both literary and historical; the two are not mutually exclusive.’
    • ‘This book has the feel of something pieced together over time, with the parallelisms between its three parts carefully arranged but hardly spontaneous.’
    • ‘The parallelism is clear: between male social relations inside the novel, and those that produced its writing.’
    • ‘Deeper parallelisms involve the relation between false appearances and underlying sincerity or genuineness.’
    • ‘Some writers, however, have noted the parallelisms between an objectivistic Marxism and Whitehead's objective relativism.’
    • ‘Chris Baldick finds interesting parallelisms to this concept of defamiliarization in both Romantic poetry and in Brecht's theatre.’
    similarity, likeness, resemblance, analogy, correspondence, equivalence, correlation
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The use of successive verbal constructions in poetry or prose which correspond in grammatical structure, sound, metre, meaning, etc.
      ‘parallelism suggests a connection of meaning through an echo of form’
      count noun ‘the parallelisms are reinforced by frequent alliteration’
      • ‘An analysis of this speech reveals that the student used varied repetition strategies, including anaphora, antithesis, chiasmus, and parallelism.’
      • ‘The phonemic patterning and the parallelism of phrase vocalize a concealed anxiety about the momentum and acceleration of this technological revolution.’
      • ‘Aside from the Yiddish / Hebrew parallelisms, Gordin's text sometimes uses two consecutive adjectives that basically have the same meaning, in order to double their effect.’
      • ‘In Psalms, to which St John the Baptist alludes, the trope of the ‘bridegroom’ occurs in a series of parallelisms, balanced by an explicitly competitive image.’
      • ‘Through alliteration, anaphora, parallelism and slant-rhyme, Sleigh builds momentum into the eleven, rhythmic couplets and suggests a train's smooth travel.’
    2. 1.2Computing The use of parallel processing.
      ‘massive parallelism gives neural networks a high degree of fault tolerance’
      • ‘To begin with, it is based on a grid architecture that uses a shared-nothing distributed approach and deploys performance features such as multi-threading, pipeline parallelism and partitioning.’
      • ‘Thus, continued improvement in supercomputer performance at current rates will require a massive increase in parallelism, requiring significant research progress in algorithms and software.’
      • ‘As part of the deal between Compaq and Intel also involves a program of joint engineering development focused on advanced parallelism for high-end computing.’
      • ‘Supercomputing is, almost exclusively, parallel computing, in which parallelism is available at all hardware and software levels of the system and in all dimensions of the system.’
      • ‘Sisal needs a C or Fortran compiler and an underlying operating system that implements parallelism in order to produce parallel code.’

Pronunciation

parallelism

/ˈparəlɛlɪzəm/