Definition of pantofle in English:

pantofle

Pronunciation /panˈtɒf(ə)l//ˈpantəf(ə)l/

noun

historical
  • A high-heeled slipper or light shoe.

    • ‘The pantofle was removed indoors, particularly while dancing, so that one could ' trip light-footed '.’
    • ‘He stood in his felt pantofles and regarded her with shrewd eyes.’
    • ‘From the late 15th to the mid 17th century, overshoes shaped like mules, called pantofles, were worn to protect the front of the shoes.’
    • ‘These, too, were worn inside another shoe, or pantofle, to protect them.’
    • ‘Out-of-doors, well-to-do Elizabethans wore two pairs of shoes, an inner slipper and the outer shoe (pantofle), which required some practice to keep on while walking.’
    mule, moccasin, house shoe
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 15th century: from French pantoufle.

Pronunciation

pantofle

/panˈtɒf(ə)l//ˈpantəf(ə)l/