Main definitions of pang in English

: pang1pang2

pang1

noun

  • A sudden sharp pain or painful emotion.

    ‘Lindsey experienced a sharp pang of guilt’
    ‘the snack bar will keep those hunger pangs at bay’
    • ‘She knew that he was avoiding her and it sent physical pangs of pain through her body.’
    • ‘I decided to go sit underneath the willow, maybe get a nap in to relieve me of my piercing pangs of pain.’
    • ‘Try to eat at least 3-5 small meals throughout the day that will keep hunger pangs at bay.’
    • ‘He tried thinking of the first time these pangs of emotion had hit him, and he could only say that it had been a long time.’
    • ‘Hunger pangs mixed with pain from his injuries to put him in a miserable state of stupor.’
    • ‘It's very common to mistake thirst for hunger pangs, especially before bed.’
    • ‘It all helped to keep energy levels up, and made everyone forget the pangs of hunger and thirst, for well over three hours.’
    • ‘A sudden pang of pain hit my chest, and I held onto it trying to ease the pain.’
    • ‘She twisted around to try and see the damage he had done and was rewarded with a sharp pang of pain.’
    • ‘There are already countless messages posted on the site revealing how to hold the dreaded pangs of hunger at bay.’
    • ‘Most important of all, hunger pangs should be minimal and your appetite under control.’
    • ‘Thirst is often mistaken for hunger pangs, and many people eat when they should really be drinking a glass of water, leading to weight gain.’
    • ‘My stomach muscles yearned for food, scolding me with sharp pangs that jolted my brain.’
    • ‘Besides I've discovered that many people actually mistake hunger pangs for thirst messages.’
    • ‘At some stage or the other in our lives we experience the gnawing pangs of an emotion which defies definition.’
    • ‘Once ingested, they provided a big boost to Highlanders in battle or in the fields, as well as preventing thirst and hunger pangs.’
    • ‘He felt the first sharp pangs of separation at the familiar sight.’
    • ‘The thought sank into her and brought her senses to life, and Alli felt a sudden pang of guilt and panic strike her.’
    • ‘Serena felt the first pangs of labour pains on New Year's Eve and made her way to Wexford hospital.’
    • ‘My heart and stomach were turning on me, aching in painful pangs of guilt and hopelessness.’
    pain, sharp pain, shooting pain, twinge, stab, spasm, ache, cramp
    qualm, misgiving, scruple, twinge, prick, dart, twitch, gnawing
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 15th century: perhaps an alteration of prong.

Pronunciation

pang

/paŋ/

Main definitions of pang in English

: pang1pang2

pang2

adjective

Northern Irish, Scottish
  • Crammed or densely packed.

    ‘pang full of meat and bread’
    • ‘When I got the length of Mr Anthony's street, it was pang full of people.’
    • ‘He was a rude man and pang full of oaths.’
    • ‘The prose is strewn with biblical and poetic tags and pang full of rhetorical devices.’
    • ‘The provincial judge was pang full of ministerial influence.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: origin unknown.

Pronunciation

pang

/paŋ/