Definition of pandemonium in English:

pandemonium

noun

mass noun
  • Wild and noisy disorder or confusion; uproar.

    ‘there was complete pandemonium—everyone just panicked’
    • ‘There would be political pandemonium if it were actually proposed, however.’
    • ‘How appalling for people living and running businesses beside this noise, mess and pandemonium.’
    • ‘There was a lot of screaming, panic and pandemonium.’
    • ‘It has been pandemonium in Korea this past week, with normally-reserved people giving vent to joyful feelings in a way they probably never have.’
    • ‘And from there it was pandemonium, it was hard to see what happened.’
    • ‘There was pandemonium in the bar when the television was put off during the Armagh match but after some negotiation was quickly put back on again.’
    • ‘The pandemonium that erupted around the university track in the aftermath of Bannister's run may have also contributed to undermine the rules.’
    • ‘It has become a macabre ritual here: the bombs go off, pandemonium, followed by investigation.’
    • ‘Clamor and outrage broke out and pandemonium reeked more havoc than anything else could.’
    • ‘In the strange pandemonium that has always bedevilled Sudanese politics, even weirder things have happened.’
    • ‘Uproar and pandemonium followed, matched only by that of the previous week when Mr. Loy won twice.’
    • ‘We were all jumping up and down already, so once he got there, it was complete pandemonium.’
    • ‘It was complete pandemonium in the Peterson household the week before the wedding.’
    • ‘They're just there to add to the general sense of pandemonium.’
    • ‘I knew that a lack of heir undoubtedly lead to pandemonium and anarchy.’
    • ‘There was pandemonium at the docks as people tried to get out by boat, but the North Vietnamese were just across the river.’
    • ‘The chaos beset domestic flights and hotel bookings as well, with resorts in the Red Sea and Aswan expecting pandemonium.’
    • ‘On the collective level, poison gas created confusion and pandemonium.’
    • ‘Through all the noise, commotion and apparent pandemonium, there was heavy and effective policing.’
    • ‘Let me tell you about the non-stop insanity, the constant chaos, the perpetual pandemonium.’
    turmoil, disorder, confusion, chaos, commotion, disturbance, tumult, turbulence, mayhem, havoc, bedlam, all hell broken loose
    bedlam, chaos, mayhem, uproar, madness, havoc, turmoil, tumult, commotion, confusion, disorder, anarchy, furore, frenzy, clamour, din, hubbub, hue and cry, babel, rumpus, fracas, hurly-burly, maelstrom
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 17th century: modern Latin (denoting the place of all demons, in Milton's Paradise Lost), from pan- ‘all’ + Greek daimōn ‘demon’.

Pronunciation

pandemonium

/ˌpandɪˈməʊnɪəm/