Definition of pandect in English:

pandect

noun

historical
  • 1A complete body of the laws of a country.

    • ‘Its chief products included one-volume bibles (pandects) specifically made for export to other centres, thus disseminating the elegant Tours script and decorated initials.’
    • ‘Although other centres such as Lorsch, Micy, and Metz also produced single-volume pandects, it was more usual for individual books or groups of books of the Bible to be copied.’
    • ‘To say Latin ‘Bible’ is to mis-speak because pandects or works with all of the biblical books gathered together in one place were rare.’
    • ‘These new pandects were authorized and signed by eleven peers, twenty-five general officers, and fifty superior officers.’
    • ‘They indifferently accepted the German Pandect law as the common law of Germany.’
    1. 1.1A compendium in 50 books of the Roman civil law made by order of Justinian in the 6th century.
      • ‘This year of 1147 is one to be remembered, because from that time forward the Pandects have been open to the writers and the jurists of the world.’
      • ‘Yet even in England the principles of the Code and the Pandects made silent conquests.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French pandecte, from Latin pandecta, from Greek pandektēs all-receiver, from pan all + dektēs (from dekhesthai receive).

Pronunciation:

pandect

/ˈpandɛkt/