Main definitions of page in English

: page1page2

page1

noun

  • 1One or both sides of a sheet of paper in a book, magazine, newspaper, or other collection of bound sheets:

    ‘a book of not less than 40 pages’
    ‘he was turning the pages of his Sunday newspaper’
    • ‘He took out some leaves which had been dried after being pressed between the pages of magazines for a long time.’
    • ‘Another example of a watermark is the chain-and-wire pattern imbedded in the pages of another book in the MHS collection.’
    • ‘Better to work quietly behind the scenes on the things that make a big impact on the balance sheet rather than on the pages of national newspapers.’
    • ‘Doing interviews only takes up time, and he does not care to see his face on the pages of magazines and newspapers.’
    • ‘They were done on scraps of paper, mainly pages torn from magazines, and they were accompanied by writing, either in the form of titles of the work or as more extended commentaries.’
    • ‘Inside were pages of paper with text clipped from newspapers and magazines.’
    • ‘The book includes 90 pages of photographs from the national collection which have never been published previously.’
    • ‘He took out a battered red book with pages sticking out from the sides and a foreign inscription on the cover.’
    • ‘What made him pen this immense book (382 folio pages in the original Turkish) and how on earth did he find the time?’
    • ‘These are rare times when artists who make images that document and comment on our present are being shown on walls and in the pages of magazines and books.’
    • ‘Only the faintest hint of green remains, the same doubtful color you see in leaves pressed between the pages of a book.’
    • ‘How about having a cup of freshly brewed coffee while leafing through pages of an interesting book?’
    • ‘Indeed, these poems also fit into the definition of poetry given in the first pages of the collection.’
    • ‘He flipped through his geometry book, skimming the pages for any sign of the folded paper that he'd written out his homework onto.’
    • ‘Stuck between the pages of the book was a loose sheet of paper, folded in four, and crisp and white, clearly not old like the book.’
    • ‘Illustrations on a book cover or the inside pages of a magazine often go well with the readers, attracting their attention.’
    • ‘These are cartoons from the centre pages of the papers, indicating an era when the best English cricketers were proper household names.’
    • ‘Archivists scour the collection for relevant pages, then conduct three separate reviews to see if they might be covered by a special exemption.’
    • ‘This substantial collection of 105 pages of poems is not related as a narrative, but as a variety of incidents from different lives.’
    • ‘The pages of collectors' books bring to life the rich art history of wrapping paper and gift bags.’
    folio, sheet, side, leaf
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The material written or printed on a page:
      ‘she silently read several pages’
      • ‘One could write twenty pages expressing one's very life and all for a six penny stamp - a great mental therapy and if a reply came one could set up a counselling service deux-a deux!’
      • ‘I prepared about 35 pages of notes and materials in two bundles.’
      • ‘In the past two days I've written over 31 pages of my novel.’
      • ‘He has already written 60 pages, picking up where Manchester left off, and has also carefully gone through the author's outline.’
      • ‘He took some notes on what he had found, and printed out some pages, Williams said.’
      • ‘His life should remain a challenge to all who write and read these pages.’
      • ‘Remember that last week you read 1402 pages of academic research and wrote 11 pages.’
      • ‘She said rural Ireland inspired her and she wrote pages of poetry about the landscape and the people.’
      • ‘She flipped through a few pages of hand written material; written in a script only the oldest dragons could understand.’
      • ‘Before I started drafting the piece, I sat down and wrote out about two pages of free association, just listing images that fit with two of the themes of the story.’
      • ‘Not far into it but if you do try reading this make sure you don't miss the fine print on the publisher page.’
      • ‘Very quickly I printed off what I had written and put the page into my consider pile.’
      • ‘A read of the thousands of pages of materials left by Sir Henry, his sons, and grandsons shows them in a constant struggle to find meaning in their lives.’
      • ‘She sat down there and then and wrote seven pages of notes.’
      • ‘After writing 10 pages of notes and coming to no conclusions, I looked at the clock and it was 4: 30.’
      • ‘Mr B Brenan and Mr J R Smith who regularly writes to your letters page should also get praised for the work they do.’
      • ‘He decided to read the pages he had written before continuing, to correct them of errors and to regain some of the flow of yesterday.’
      • ‘If you need a more detailed description of the making of a Japanese woodblock print, read the page about Japanese prints.’
      • ‘There are 167 legal-pad pages of notes, written in black fountain pen.’
      • ‘It had an addendum page printed in blue, with some late-breaking news.’
    2. 1.2[with modifier] A page of a newspaper or magazine set aside for a particular topic:
      ‘the Letters Page’
      • ‘An article printed on Friday's opinion page in a local newspaper, had also strongly questioned if running is an appropriate first step.’
      • ‘In your May Letters pages, Des Lambert wrote of the Cornish use of the word directly (pronounced dreckly) to convey an impending event.’
      • ‘We don't do the dainty minuet of the newspaper editorial page.’
      • ‘Banks aren't just the kind of businesses that we read about on the stock market page of the newspaper.’
      • ‘Anybody who reads the editorial page is not for us anyway.’
      • ‘The op-ed pages of every newspaper are filled with strong opinions.’
      • ‘I've never gone and given a full blessing to an entire newspaper op-ed page before.’
      • ‘The reason his name leaped out from the fine print of the obit page was the cover art of his Columbia records, which I never forgot.’
      • ‘On the op-ed pages of major newspapers, however, the number of female columnists is roughly that of 25 years ago.’
      • ‘They are, essentially, just an extended version of a newspaper editorial page with many varied, individual voices.’
      • ‘Usually, we devote our editorial pages to the work of established residential architects.’
      • ‘Photographs of her decadent studio parties regularly graced the society pages of magazines and newspapers.’
      • ‘The decision was taken to withhold all advertising from the main broadsheet news pages of the paper.’
      • ‘Overall, I'm confident the great majority of publishers and opinion page editors embrace diversity.’
      • ‘Start reading the business pages of the newspapers, the editorials on topics you hate, weird articles,… anything that is boring.’
      • ‘Part of the debate occurred in the public square of newspaper opinion pages and magazines.’
      • ‘Isn't a newspaper editorial page supposed to give its opinion on whether a nominee is good or not?’
      • ‘Lawyer Richard Potter points out that the odd word said in jest in the gossip pages of newspapers and magazines can also cause legal headaches.’
      • ‘I'll read the letters page of any newspaper within reach.’
      • ‘He also handles the obituary page on the local newspaper.’
    3. 1.3Computing A section of stored data, especially that which can be displayed on a screen at one time.
      • ‘You see, in the Tools section there is a page that allows you to look for firmware updates and the like.’
      • ‘The help section on the admin page gives detailed descriptions on how to use the web interface.’
      • ‘The messages are not actually kept in the air: they're stored on an Internet page.’
      • ‘At last count there were 200,000 pages stored on the company's servers.’
      • ‘The software did everything from resetting Internet start pages to burying computer screens in a flurry of pop-up ads.’
    4. 1.4 A significant event or period considered as a part of a longer history:
      ‘the vote will form a page in the world's history’
      • ‘After this briefest of appearances in the pages of history, the surviving rebels disappeared from public view, wiser, sadder and more discreet.’
      • ‘This is, therefore, a new page in the history of world empires.’
      • ‘The present report is an example of the negligent obliteration of a page in the history of human endeavour.’
      • ‘It is much the same time the Ninth Legion disappears off the page of history.’
      • ‘The last chapter mainly discusses the impact of the Second World War, with the final eight pages briefly mentioning events up to 2002.’
      • ‘These fighters will all pass into the pages of boxing history in a short period of time.’
      • ‘The festival can be found in the pages of history and this is the place where Emperor Asoka embraced Buddhism.’
      • ‘They faded away in distress, in vain and into the forgotten pages of local history.’
      • ‘However, they may be forgetting one point which is that when history turns a new page, it can't be easily turned back.’
      • ‘All of them have left their imprints on the pages of history.’
      • ‘Brings back memories of why Edmonton does have its shining moments in the pages of my past and makes me think that a future there wouldn't be that bad a thing either.’
      • ‘Thus did Major William Brydon, a Scottish surgeon, make his mark on the pages of history.’
      • ‘Faces engraved in the pages of history have been a favourite subject of the artist.’
      • ‘Realising that it was mostly the community's men who were well documented in the palace's existing archives, Sarah set about filling in the missing pages of history.’
      • ‘Apart from rounding off a page in history, does it matter any more?’
      • ‘A rare book store which was nearly destroyed in an arson attack has turned a new page in its history.’
      • ‘It was over now, a page in history ending almost two years ago.’
      • ‘In a way it is perhaps disappointing to think that the only small mark one has made on the fragile page of history is to have danced on a table.’
      • ‘The current team want their page in history and they want to be recognised.’
      • ‘He opens a window into one of the lesser-known pages of military history.’
      period, time, episode, stage, phase, epoch, era, chapter
      View synonyms

verb

  • 1page through[no object] Look through the pages of (a book, magazine, etc.):

    ‘she was paging through a pile of Sunday newspapers’
    • ‘In the waiting room, pregnant women paged through magazines.’
    • ‘‘Well, take a look at this,’ he said, holding aloft the magazine he'd been paging through.’
    • ‘Finally, a man sits down, bringing more books from his reader's shelf, and begins paging through all of the volumes he's amassed.’
    • ‘The very contours of the yard change with each garden book that I page through.’
    • ‘The collection also has one other important feature, which allows a reader to page through each magazine by flipping directly to the cartoons.’
    • ‘I was paging through my diary wondering where to start.’
    • ‘It's one of those projects that requires paging through endless scripts, man pages and books.’
    • ‘I had very little art in school, but taught myself by experimenting, paging through books and magazines, and latching onto any adult who would talk to me about techniques at small local art shows.’
    • ‘One feels very much in the company of Waugh as one pages through the magazine.’
    • ‘In fact, teacher research is essential if students are to avoid wasting valuable time randomly paging through books on art.’
    • ‘At Target today we went down the camping aisle; Gnat chattered about this and that as she paged through her new coloring book.’
    • ‘I begin to understand a little of what old folks are sighing when they page through photos from decades ago of their friends and family: always youthful, always vigorous, never dying.’
    • ‘Spend a happy hour selecting your books, then idly page through them over a cup of coffee and muffin in the garden.’
    • ‘The book is so terrible that just paging through it was making me laugh out loud and I knew there was no way I could top the inherent comedy contained in its pages.’
    • ‘Although I faithfully page through the pile, I rarely find a story that interests me enough to actually read it.’
    • ‘I'm finding it more helpful as I go along, easier to locate articles than paging through old magazines, and takes up less space.’
    • ‘One diverting question that you can ponder as you page through the book is this: Which of the cars will be among the ‘classics of style and design’ several years hence?’
    • ‘The illustrations are often accompanied by explanatory captions which detail information not found in the text and this makes the book interesting to page through.’
    • ‘He also spent a lot of time in the college library, occasionally paging through the numerous chemistry books at his disposal.’
    • ‘He sipped a cup of coffee and paged through a personal planner as he waited.’
    1. 1.1Computing Move through and display (text) one page at a time:
      ‘a text file reader enables you to page through the authors text file using indexes’
      • ‘To read sequentially, a user simply presses the right arrow (or page down key).’
      • ‘However, if the sort batches are too large, they cause pageins because parts of the sort batch get paged out to swap during sorting.’
      • ‘The scroll wheel is a button, and it's surrounded by a bezel that has two more buttons, set to page up and down.’
      • ‘All basic PDF functions are possible, including scrolling, paging, text searches, bookmarks and page rotation.’
      • ‘Since the Symbian OS doesn't allow you to create a swap file - memory can't be paged to the memory card, which would be horribly slow in any case - there's no workaround.’
  • 2usually as noun pagingComputing
    [with object] Divide (a piece of software or data) into sections, keeping the most frequently accessed in main memory and storing the rest in virtual memory.

    • ‘Also, nVidia announced that with the driver release on May 21st, there would be a significant boost in performance during audio operations, as less bandwidth would be taken up due to memory paging optimizations in the drivers.’
    • ‘It shows how much virtual memory there is, how much is free and paging activity.’
    • ‘The users, however, are amazed at how fast the machines run after the paging file matches the memory.’
    • ‘Give each of your Linux machines a bunch of virtual memory, and let the VM hypervisor worry about paging it in and out.’
    • ‘The machine started paging out virtual memory, requests took too long, users got fed up with waiting and clicked on Stop, pressed Esc and tried logging in again until the operator pressed the big red button.’
  • 3[with object] Assign numbers to the pages in (a book or periodical); paginate.

    • ‘Some of the references are incorrectly paged.’
    • ‘But it was a mistake, we think, to have paged the volume by parts independently, instead of consecutively.’

Phrases

  • on the same page

    • In agreement:

      ‘everybody's on the same page for once’
      • ‘So make sure you've thought things through and that everyone's on the same page.’
      • ‘Were you guys all instantly on the same page when you came up with the decision to do all this?’
      • ‘With so many young players, it might be difficult to get everybody on the same page.’
      • ‘As pilots, we emphasize aircrew coordination so everyone is on the same page.’
      • ‘Politically, we are seldom on the same page, but we seem to agree that this madness has gone far enough.’
      • ‘I've supported you for nine years, because I thought we were on the same page here.’
      • ‘Debates stalled for several hours when party members could not get on the same page.’
      • ‘Even the closest of allies on the housing issue have yet to show they are completely on the same page.’
      • ‘Let me give you some additional insight into what I am talking about so that you know we are both on the same page.’
      • ‘Make sure everyone is on the same page with everyone else about what needs to be done and who's willing to do it.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from French, from Latin pagina, from pangere fasten.

Pronunciation

page

/peɪdʒ/

Main definitions of page in English

: page1page2

page2

noun

  • 1A boy or young man, usually in uniform, employed in a hotel or club to run errands, open doors, etc.

    • ‘To the front of the composition is a young page serving tea from what is probably the earliest complete depiction of a tea table with all its attendant equipage.’
    • ‘With all my nerves bunching up in my stomach, I walked out my door where an Italian page was waiting, he led me to the back rooms and let me in.’
    errand boy, pageboy, messenger boy
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A young boy attending a bride at a wedding.
      • ‘He was also a half-brother of you and was a page at that wedding.’
      attendant, pageboy, train-bearer
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2historical A boy in training for knighthood, ranking next below a squire in the personal service of a knight.
      • ‘His first dream was of him in a castle starting his training to become a knight as a page.’
      • ‘Kina's weapon was a staff, and she was put into a group with 15 squires and 30 other pages, that also had staffs.’
      • ‘Many of the archers were young boys, scarcely old enough to be pages.’
      • ‘In times past, teenagers could lead armies in battle and young pages could be made knights as early as age 12.’
      • ‘As I walked past, all the knights, squires, pages, and others practicing would bow and offer me a kind word.’
    3. 1.3historical A man or boy employed as the personal attendant of a person of rank.
      • ‘Born in Holland, Keppel attended William of Orange to England in 1688 as a page of honour.’
      • ‘Vittrius, one of the young pages, followed a man in palace livery into the room.’
      • ‘Erial sighed and turned to face the young page in her father's service.’
      • ‘He hadn't considered this, and a page attending a feast as anything but a servant for his master was highly irregular.’
      • ‘Inside, sitting cross-legged on the floor with a bowl of soup in his lap was Jad, his seemingly young page.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Summon (someone) over a public address system, so as to pass on a message:

    ‘no need to interrupt the background music just to page the concierge’
    • ‘They stat paged me to come to the emergency room.’
    • ‘We'd literally walk into a store and have the manager page the forklift guy.’
    • ‘We could get someone to page Daniel Bowen then all go up in a group to answer it.’
    • ‘Rainman had called and left a message to page him as soon as I got the message.’
    • ‘Tap a designated part of the car, and if your driver is holding the device, it pages him!’
    • ‘They decide to contact the on-call cardiologist, Dr. Grace Holloway, who is at a performance of Madama Butterfly when she is paged, to the annoyance of her boyfriend, Brian.’
    • ‘A missing person report was filed with Bedfordshire Police but a few days later he paged a friend to say he was staying at a hotel in Bombay.’
    • ‘Kira's daydream was broke with a soft voice addressed her ‘Kira, someone paged me?’’
    • ‘I paged him, and he left the broadcast booth to help talk me through this.’
    • ‘He was at Shannon Airport waiting to fly to Dublin for a squad session when he was paged.’
    • ‘In my first year as a camp director, if I left the camp for any reason, I was paged constantly and met upon my return with wails of ‘We didn't know what to do without you!’’
    • ‘If she gets busy she pages me and I go retrieve him.’
    • ‘Anyway, I don't want to tarry for too long as I don't want the hospital to page me.’
    • ‘First, started out the evening of the accident, I was paged by the Somerset 911 system and asked to call communications over the phone, which told me we were dealing with something right away out of the ordinary.’
    • ‘My wife was very distressed and paged me in the House of Commons.’
    • ‘Members were paged and were fighting the fire within 10 minutes of being called.’
    • ‘You get panicky and page your friend who's capable of tackling such problems.’
    • ‘How would you all feel if I didn't answer when you paged me?’
    • ‘On November 21, Felix paged Johnson and drove to the health club.’
    • ‘Olanrewaju told him he was looking for the duty inspector at the fuel station who had paged him that night for advice but whom he could not find.’
    ask for, broadcast for, summon, send for
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1often as noun paging Contact by means of a pager:
      ‘many systems have paging as a standard feature’
      • ‘He reached into a pocket and pulled out what looked like his own paging device, but when he handed it over, Evan could see it wasn't his.’
      • ‘By the early 1990s, he had diversified into the paging and mobile-radio industries.’
      • ‘The phone calls, the forms, the follow-up with consultants, the incessant paging… All for patients that I rarely even see.’
      • ‘I basically have my own paging system, keeping a small number of blocks from a large grid resident at any one time.’
      • ‘When he got there, the paging system was busy calling for passengers for Seoul.’
      • ‘It seems that many pensioners down the country get outside the 60 foot range of their paging devices when they slip on the frozen ground while hauling turf into the house.’
      • ‘Room-to-room paging is also a must in a house of this size, and Simmons dialed in a Panasonic digital phone system for the job.’
      • ‘He was instructed that he would have to call her and tell her to stop paging him.’
      • ‘He didn't have time to bring them directly to your room this time, because his work was paging him.’
      • ‘The intention is also to sell mobile and paging services, offer feeds for sport and finance, provide sites for online gaming and music downloads and even offer conferencing services.’
      • ‘There's no boisterous paging system, and the parts and service area is as clean as the showroom itself - not one drip of oil on the terra cotta tiles.’
      • ‘This will allow broadcasters to attract, for instance, business audiences to whom they can sell information services such as closed-circuit transmission, on-line data, paging and radio-based security systems.’
      • ‘Instead of a time-consuming paging system, a central controller alerts the nearest member of staff to a crisis, by activating a light on the badge.’
      • ‘The alert can be communicated via e-mail, for example, or via a paging system, she explains.’
      • ‘I was calling Trevor on the mobile and paging him.’
      • ‘I've hired a receptionist and I have a paging device in case something does happen.’
      • ‘It seemed like whoever was calling her a few minutes ago was now paging for her.’
      • ‘He hustled R.V. Smethurst off stage rather like a chucker-out in a pub regretfully ejecting an old and respected customer, and starting paging G.G. Simmons.’
      • ‘He's with a patient at the moment, but she's paging him.’
      • ‘Sensing that the two needed some time to work out their current differences, the nurse, who had wheeled Josh in, politely excused herself, telling the two to press the paging button near the bed if they needed anything.’
      ask for, broadcast for, summon, send for
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘youth, uncouth male’): from Old French, perhaps from Italian paggio, from Greek paidion, diminutive of pais, paid- boy. Early use of the verb (mid 16th century) was in the sense ‘follow as or like a page’; its current sense dates from the early 20th century.

Pronunciation

page

/peɪdʒ/