Definition of ovoid in English:



  • 1(of a solid or a three-dimensional surface) more or less egg-shaped.

    • ‘They consisted of a closed smooth membrane and were round, ovoid, or irregular in shape.’
    • ‘Three flowerpots rest on an ovoid surface, perhaps a ceramic tray or table top whose legs have vanished.’
    • ‘Their abdomens are variable in shape being triangular, round to ovoid to elongate, sometimes extending tail-like past the spinnerets.’
    • ‘Flickers of reds, yellows and orange emerge from the depths, and the strange ovoid canvases reflect the surface while hovering over it.’
    • ‘These inclusions appeared round in transverse and ovoid in longitudinal sections.’
    bulging, round, fat, rotund, swollen, spherical, swelling, distended, bloated, protuberant, ovoid, convex, pear-shaped, bulb-shaped, balloon-shaped
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    1. 1.1(of a plane figure) oval, especially with one end more pointed than the other.
      oval, egg-shaped, elliptic, ovate, ovoid, oviform, ellipsoidal
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  • An ovoid body or surface.

    • ‘And the ovoids, too small to hold the molecules needed to carry out the chemical reactions of life, are just chance deposits with interesting shapes.’
    • ‘The most emotionally moving and evocative rooms contain the ovoids - egg or face shaped sculptures which are quite overwhelming in their minimalist perfection.’
    • ‘By contrast, the Riesling turned out to be the perfect accompaniment for my main course: a thick slice of roast pork loin, with roast apples and parsnips, and a generous ovoid of buttery mashed potatoes.’
    • ‘The opening at the blunt terminus of the glacier is a massive black ovoid, 25 feet tall and 40 feet across.’
    • ‘Passing Bell is an eerie composition of fossil-gray verticals supporting gray, red and purple ovoids, punctuated with shocks of orange.’
    ball, pellet, pill, globule, spheroid, spherule, sphere, oval, ovoid, orb, round, pearl
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Early 19th century: from French ovoïde, from modern Latin ovoides, from Latin ovum egg.