Definition of overtake in English:

overtake

verb

[with object]
  • 1British Catch up with and pass while travelling in the same direction.

    ‘the driver overtook a line of vehicles’
    no object ‘he overtook in the face of oncoming traffic’
    • ‘Now, if a daring driver decides to overtake the bus in front, he runs into trouble in uniform.’
    • ‘Police are investigating the apparent road rage incident which is believed to have occurred after the bus overtook a line of stationary vehicles.’
    • ‘It is a dark stretch of road and the driver who was overtaken may not have been aware of the accident behind.’
    • ‘A driver attempted to overtake them but couldn't complete the move, and pulled towards their SUV.’
    • ‘She noted the car overtaking her car was travelling at considerable speed and had commented to her husband: ‘God, he's flying.’’
    • ‘Take along some mint because the fast descent down the mountain might disturb even city folk, especially when the driver pulls out to overtake other cars on the narrow road.’
    • ‘My driver then tries to overtake the truck at the same time.’
    • ‘It is thought a dark-coloured Vauxhall Corsa, travelling south, overtook a line of traffic headed by a container lorry.’
    • ‘Express bus drivers who don't overtake other buses, hence stopping unnecessarily at every stop.’
    • ‘Wait until it is safe to overtake, and then pass wide and slow.’
    • ‘That's the key to what we have to do, is we have to maintain the ability to pass and overtake.’
    • ‘The Vauxhall, travelling towards Bath, was overtaking a line of stationary vehicles looking to turn right.’
    • ‘The Focus had stopped when a vehicle, travelling in the opposite direction, overtook another vehicle, which had stopped so the driver could remove an obstruction from the road.’
    • ‘The light overtook them, passed through the car and vanished - and Gill and his friend kept right on driving!’
    • ‘Isn't it just so annoying when one lorry travelling at 60 mph tries to overtake another which is travelling at 58 mph?’
    • ‘He told the inquiry he was aware there was a vehicle, a Transit van, behind him which overtook the bus, passing by closely.’
    • ‘After overtaking some cars the driver had tried to get back on the correct side of the road, but lost control and hit a Rover travelling out of Bradford, the inquest heard.’
    • ‘Then the driver of the car overtook the first car and tried to cross.’
    • ‘Sights like these become familiar after a few days in Pakistan, although it takes a little longer to get used to drivers overtaking the buses and everything else on blind bends with horns blaring.’
    • ‘The two drivers overtook a number of vehicles along the road and witness statements expressed concerns about the speed of the two sports cars.’
    pass, get past, go past, go by, overhaul, get ahead of, pull ahead of, leave behind, outdistance, outstrip
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    1. 1.1 Become greater or more successful than.
      ‘Germany rapidly overtook Britain in industrial output’
      • ‘The bad news is that the consumer PC market is rapidly approaching maturity, with renewals overtaking first-time purchases.’
      • ‘And seafood recently overtook other agriculture as an export success story, bolstered by boasts of clean water and fresh air.’
      • ‘Nobody in retailing underestimates the power of the card: its success undoubtedly helped Tesco to overtake Sainsbury as Britain's leading grocer.’
      • ‘In recent years, low prices have devastated coffee farming in Rwanda, and tea exports have now overtaken coffee.’
      • ‘But although he continued recording, his deep soul style was rapidly overtaken by funk and disco and, later, rap.’
      • ‘Building construction is rapidly overtaking all other developmental activities.’
      • ‘Coffee has overtaken tea as the most popular drink outside the home.’
      • ‘The team has managed to overtake last year's successes to receive commendation for every entry they submitted this year.’
      • ‘He said the boom in China's economy had helped shipping overtake tourism.’
      • ‘According to US tourism statistics, Britons have now overtaken the Japanese in terms of the numbers flying to New York.’
      • ‘Last year, asparagus overtook coffee as Peru's top export crop and accounted for roughly a quarter of the country's farm exports.’
      • ‘Today, the fishing industry has overtaken the peanut sector as Senegal's No.1 foreign exchange earner.’
      • ‘After all the EU is rapidly overtaking the States as the pre-eminent economic superpower.’
      • ‘Later that year he presented the Report on Manufactures, an ambitious plan to overtake Britain in industrial output.’
      • ‘Tourism is doing pretty well in Mauritius, too, and is set to overtake sugar as the country's most important industry.’
      • ‘The seven largest US biotechnology firms have overtaken the pharmaceutical industry's 9.1% rise.’
      • ‘They are developing successful, job-creating, renewable energy industries and they have overtaken Australia.’
      • ‘Tourism and family remittances have overtaken traditional exports as the country's prime earners.’
      • ‘While chipping at the landing is still the principal means of comminution, bundling is growing rapidly and could easily overtake roadside chipping within a few years.’
      • ‘But just as the petrol engine overtook the trams and the telephone surpassed the telegraph, it now seems the mobile is set to conquer the landline.’
      outstrip, surpass, overshadow, eclipse, outshine, outclass
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  • 2(especially of misfortune) come suddenly or unexpectedly upon.

    ‘disaster overtook the town in AD 296’
    • ‘A Shandean fate overtook his body, which was taken by grave-robbers, recognized at an anatomy lecture in Cambridge, and secretly returned to its grave.’
    • ‘But events soon overtook the project, and the filmmakers end up recording history in the making.’
    • ‘But in many ways the report has been overtaken by events.’
    • ‘At one point we saw the wreck of a train which was lying on its side with steam still escaping from the boiler, evidence that disaster had overtaken it not very long before.’
    • ‘In this, time was an indispensable ally: dictators might die, crops fail, disaster overtake an expedition; it all helps, given time.’
    • ‘If there was an option of delinking from America it was never seriously exercised or was overtaken by events.’
    • ‘Or was it a forecast of the deluge of disaster that has since overtaken the area and the country in the form of cold, heartless crime?’
    • ‘Our April 13 statement has now been overtaken by events.’
    • ‘Anything I say about that now is likely going to be overtaken by events within the next 48 hours.’
    • ‘With pure madness and natural disasters overtaking the entire planet, how could I believe that the Cayman Islands would remain unscathed?’
    • ‘Unfortunately, as happens so often to columnists who monitor current affairs at the global level, events overtake the best of intentions.’
    • ‘She is concerned that, unless things change fairly rapidly, a similar fate will overtake her own premises.’
    • ‘Whatever disaster overtook life on Earth at the end of the Permian killed off just about all of the temnospondyls in a fairly short space of time.’
    • ‘They planned to consider the matter again as soon as the report was finalised but were overtaken by events.’
    • ‘This is the evil that happens under the sun: The same destiny overtakes all.’
    • ‘The unprecedented economic boom has overtaken the entire infrastructure implemented by the city planners.’
    • ‘The costs were massive and new procedures were often overtaken by events even before they were implemented.’
    • ‘Even greater disasters overtook the once mighty empires of Spain and Portugal.’
    • ‘Even such a disaster as had overtaken them at Kup caused no despondency among the Sikhs.’
    • ‘But archaeologists found themselves on the wrong side of history, overtaken by events that they tried hard to forestall.’
    1. 2.1 (of a feeling) affect (someone) suddenly and powerfully.
      ‘weariness overtook him and he retired to bed’
      • ‘When curiosity overtakes me, I scoop the parcel into a glass and prudently cover it with a dinner plate.’
      • ‘No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man.’
      • ‘Curiosity overtaking her, she started to move towards the mysterious person and at the two rapid paces, arrived at one another unusually quickly.’
      • ‘Instead, we see his unvarnished, unpretty tears when anguish overtakes him.’
      • ‘A feeling of peacefulness overtook her and, for once, she forgot the recent tragedies.’
      • ‘Confusion and doubt overtook him, and in his despair he ran up astronomical charges on 1-900 help lines.’
      • ‘I was suddenly overtaken by feelings of panic and fear.’
      • ‘Whichever feeling overtakes you, it's likely to be associated with change.’
      • ‘If I didn't, I feared panic would overtake me so badly that I really had no other choice but to try and go.’
      • ‘Angst has overtaken him, he says of his year on tour.’
      • ‘This year a general mood of depression has overtaken people whose lives depend on agriculture.’
      • ‘A heady rush of feelings and pleasures overtook her.’
      • ‘A strange feeling overtook me and I shook my head, trying to clear these betraying thoughts.’
      • ‘When one of these moods overtook her, she became unmanageable.’
      • ‘A sudden feeling of loss overtook Peter with surprising speed.’
      • ‘Then his sadness and sorrow overtook him and he fell to his knees again by Rivta's side, crying.’
      • ‘But even before he manages to draw out his weapon, panic overtakes him and he flees to a small tailor shop next door.’
      • ‘I felt my eyes widened, grief overtaking me while anger was slowly creeping up into my feelings.’
      • ‘You don't let frustration overtake you when you're looking for change.’
      • ‘Before he could make sense of the hieroglyphs, a heavy feeling overtook him as his meal worked through his limbs.’
      befall, happen to, come upon, hit, strike, fall on, overwhelm, overpower, overcome, be visited on, engulf, sweep over, take by surprise, surprise, catch unawares, catch unprepared, catch off guard
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Pronunciation

overtake

/əʊvəˈteɪk/