Definition of overproduce in English:

overproduce

verb

[with object]
  • 1Produce more of (a product or commodity) than is wanted or needed.

    ‘our unplanned manufacturing system continually overproduces consumer products’
    • ‘Some people, however, overproduce these helpers, resulting in excessive muscle and joint swelling.’
    • ‘These drugs make your body tissues more sensitive to insulin and keep your liver from overproducing glucose.’
    • ‘He and other critics contend that taxpayers are subsidizing mostly large operations that overproduce corn, wheat, soybeans, rice and cotton.’
    • ‘This is the first of a novel class of cancer drugs that targets an enzyme overproduced by many cancer cells.’
    • ‘Indeed, mice that overproduce growth hormone die sooner than normal mice, and fruit flies that underproduce growth hormone live longer than normal flies.’
    • ‘Researchers there figured out how to get plants to overproduce a hormone that ensures that if pollen from genetically modified crops drifts to other species, the resulting seeds won't germinate.’
    • ‘The patients who are likely to overproduce these inflammatory factors and to develop septic shock syndrome can be identified in a few hours by DNA scans.’
    • ‘Second, we test the male quality hypothesis, which suggests that females mated to attractive high-quality males should overproduce males.’
    • ‘The mice had been bred to overproduce a protein which had been implicated previously in tumor formation.’
    • ‘What's Going On: Allergies and colds can cause the membrane that lines your middle ear to become inflamed and overproduce mucus.’
    • ‘The problem is that their remarkable efficiency allows them to overproduce almost any commodity, so agriculture tends to lurch from surplus to surplus.’
    • ‘For example, among polygynous mammals, and thus among most primates, mothers in the best physical condition were originally expected to overproduce males.’
    • ‘He said: ‘We overproduce food in this country, and we have to sell it somewhere, so any large company with multi-national interests is going to be trying to get its food sold overseas.’’
    • ‘Mice that overproduce growth hormone live shorter lives.’
    • ‘In doing so it created disgustingly large food mountains, overproducing unwanted food simply to keep greedy farmers in business.’
    • ‘The researchers studied mice genetically engineered to overproduce a protein in the wall of the aorta, the body's primary artery.’
    • ‘Many of the largest corporations have overproduced their commodities.’
    • ‘Researchers have dramatically increased the life spans of mice by genetically engineering them to overproduce a protein called klotho.’
    • ‘Females could be engineered to overproduce human proteins of pharmaceutical interest in their milk, with production being turned on and off by the administration of hormones.’
    • ‘A common strategy is to overproduce cells and then eliminate those that are no longer needed or that are potentially dangerous to the animal.’
  • 2often as adjective overproducedRecord or arrange (a song or piece of music) in such an elaborate way that the spontaneity or artistry of the original material is lost.

    ‘a series of overproduced albums’
    • ‘But for the most part, this band is overproduced and sounds tailor-made for all-hit radio, in the worst possible way.’
    • ‘But, this being 2003, they sound dated, overproduced and silly.’
    • ‘The resulting song feels overproduced and too distinctly current, and temporarily hinders the album's retro charm.’
    • ‘By foregoing drawn out studio time and overproduced songs, he really has ‘gotten back to basics’ albeit with a stronger launch pad than ever before.’
    • ‘The rest of the album, overproduced to the point of banality, barely registers as individual songs.’
    • ‘Far from being overproduced, the EP almost sounds like it was recorded off the floor, retaining a raw and simple feel that suits the guys and the noise they make.’
    • ‘Most of the stories are so pathetically ‘manufactured’ and overproduced.’
    • ‘She doesn't write the music or work the boards and yet she doesn't feel too slick or overproduced.’
    • ‘The title track, an echoey and bombastic pop ballad, was clearly overproduced, but rode all the way to No. 2 on the success of the film and the soundtrack.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, at times, the slickness of the series at times takes on the sterilized feel of a game show rather than a live and vibrant poker tournament - it's a little too overproduced.’
    • ‘And their gutter-laden, trashy sound is fresh and invigorating when every other punk band today overproduces their album into listless cookie-cutter status.’
    • ‘I've seen the glossy, overproduced, half-hour infomercials that pass for girls' cartoons.’
    • ‘It's a television set piece, something entirely formulaic, earnest, goody-goody, proud of itself, overproduced.’
    • ‘It's slick, overproduced, huge-guitar pop, but for stuff like that, it doesn't get much better.’
    • ‘Both of us feel that so many recordings are so overproduced today and we wanted to do something very simple and honest and beautiful.’
    • ‘Sure a lot of it is tepid, bland and overproduced, but hey, so's a lot of British music these days.’
    • ‘Just when it seems like it's going to turn bombastic or become overproduced and yawn-inducing, it surprises.’
    • ‘The band sounded slick and overproduced, and gone was that raw sound that distinguished the earlier albums.’
    • ‘The songs are more organic and not overproduced.’
    • ‘But the overall album is either cheesily overproduced or simply too lo-fi.’

Pronunciation

overproduce

/əʊvəprəˈdjuːs/