Definition of overpraise in English:

overpraise

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Praise more highly than is warranted.

    ‘the island's tourist publications tend to overpraise their restaurants’
    • ‘It happened very fast, and I knew that I was being overpraised in my first three books.’
    • ‘There are so many excellent elements that it is easy to overpraise the work here.’
    • ‘When someone has a great run, it gets overpraised because it is so very rare.’
    • ‘Craven undoubtedly overpraised these painters.’
    • ‘My point was only that the same could have been said for Amores Perros, which you thought was overpraised.’
    • ‘It is possible to overpraise this film and the invocation of these directors may have this effect.’
    • ‘It is not necessary to overpraise, or lead them to think they are wonderfully smart, for this would make them vain, and even pert.’
    • ‘In this country we tend to either over praise someone, before knocking them down, or we just tear them to pieces straight away.’
    • ‘I still think your reviews give away too many plot points and tend toward over praise, but I still enjoy them.’
    • ‘His work here is impossible to over praise.’
    • ‘And, like X-Men 2 last summer, it is being way overpraised by critics in my opinion.’
    • ‘For reasons of nationalism & advertising revenue, the island's tourist publications tend to overpraise their restaurants, sometimes ludricously.’
    • ‘The cinematography has been wildly overpraised, shot in high contrast black-and-white to remove all beauty and charm from the Limousin countryside.’
    • ‘Yet, seeing herself primarily as a venue for others, she does not overpraise her own credentials.’
    • ‘This chalice, enriched with enamels, is impossible to overpraise.’
    • ‘He was overpraised towards the end of his life and is in some danger of being underrated today.’
    • ‘The film was widely overpraised.’

Pronunciation:

overpraise

/əʊvəˈpreɪz/